For 2023 and 2022, potentially dilutive securities (share options) were excluded from the calculation of diluted earnings per share as they are antidilutive Reclassified in respect of discontinued operations - see Note 25. Includes payments to shareholders for the years ended 2023, 2022 and 2021 of $475, $503 and $455, respectively. The Company does not hold directly interest or voting rights in Focus. The Company's wholly-owned subsidiary holds an option to buy the ownership of the 74% of Focus shares. According to accounting criteria in IFRS 10, the Company is viewed as effectively exercising control over Focus, and therefore, the accounts of Focus are consolidated with those of the Company (see also note 26). Dissolved as of December 31, 2023. Deconsolidated effective November 7, 2022, when Trichome filed to commence proceedings under the Companies’ Creditors Arrangement Act (CCAA) (see Note 1). 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UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549
 
FORM 20-F
 
REGISTRATION STATEMENT PURSUANT TO SECTION 12(b) OR 12(g) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
OR
 
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2023
 
OR
 
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from ____________________ to ____________________
 
OR
 
SHELL COMPANY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
Commission file number: 001-40065
 
IM Cannabis Corp.
(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)
 
British Columbia, Canada
(Jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)
 
3606 – 833 Seymour Street, Vancouver, British Columbia V6B 0G4
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
Oren Shuster, 972 544331111, oren@imcannabis.com
 3606 – 833 Seymour Street, Vancouver, British Columbia V6B 0G4
(Name, Telephone, E-Mail and/or Facsimile number and Address of Company Contact Person)
 
Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
 
Title of each class
 
Trading Symbol
 
Name of each exchange on which registered
Common Shares, no par value
 
IMCC
 
Nasdaq Capital Market
 
Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: N/A
 
Securities for which there is a reporting obligation pursuant to Section 15(d) of the Act: None
 
Indicate the number of outstanding shares of each of the issuer’s classes of capital or common stock as of the close of the period covered by the annual report: 13,394,136 Common Shares
 

Indicate by check mark if the Company is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.
 
Yes ☐          No 
 
If this report is an annual or transition report, indicate by check mark if the Company is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.
 
Yes ☐          No 
 
Indicate by check mark whether the Company (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or such shorter period that the Company was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.
 
Yes ☒          No 
 
Indicate by check mark whether the Company has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Company was required to submit and post such files).
 
Yes           No 
 
Indicate by check mark whether the Company is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
 
Large accelerated filer
 
Accelerated filer
Non-accelerated filer 
 
Emerging growth company
 
If an emerging growth company that prepares its financial statements in accordance with U.S. GAAP, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed a report on and attestation to its management’s assessment of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (15 U.S.C. 7262(b)) by the registered public accounting firm that prepared or issued its audit report.
 
If securities are registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act, indicate by check mark whether financial statements of the registrant included in the filing reflect the correction of an error to previously issued financial statements.
 
Indicate by check mark whether any of those error corrections are restatements that required a recovery analysis of incentive-based compensation received by any of the registrant’s executive officers during the relevant recovery period pursuant to §240.10D-1(b). 
 
Indicate by check mark which basis of accounting the Company has used to prepare the financial statements included in this filing:
 
U.S. GAAP
International Financial Reporting Standards as issued By the International Accounting Standards Board
Other ☐
 
If “Other” has been checked in response to previous question, indicate by check mark which financial statement item the Company has elected to follow. Item 17 Item 18
 
If this is an annual report, indicate by check mark whether the Company is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).
 
Yes           No 
 


TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
 5
 6
11
11
11
A.
Reserved.
11
B.
Capitalization and Indebtedness
11
C.
Reasons for the Offer and Use of Proceeds
11
D.
Risk Factors
11
39
A.
History and Development of the Company
39
B.
Business Overview
49
C.
Organizational Structure
63
D.
Property, Plants and Equipment
63
64
77
A.
Directors and Senior Management
77
B.
Compensation
79
C.
Board Practices
89
D.
Employees
95
E.
Share Ownership
96
F.
Disclosure of a registrant’s action to recover erroneously awarded compensation
96
96
A.
Major Shareholders
96
B.
Related Party Transactions
98
C.
Interests of Experts and Counsel
99
100
A.
Consolidated Statements and Other Financial Information
100
B.
Significant Changes
105
105
A.
Offer and Listing Details
105
B.
Plan of Distribution
105
C.
Markets
105
D.
Selling Shareholders
105
E.
Dilution
105
F.
Expenses of the Issue
105

3


105
A.
Share Capital
105
B.
Memorandum and Articles of Association
105
C.
Material Contracts
109
D.
Exchange Controls
109
E.
Taxation

F.
Dividends and Paying Agents
116
G.
Statement by Experts
116
H.
Documents on Display
116
I.
Subsidiary Information
117
J.
Annual Report to Security Holders
117
117
117
117
117
117
A.
Disclosure Controls and Procedures
117
B.
Management’s Annual Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting
118
C.
Attestation Report of Registered Public Accounting Firm
118
D.
Changes in Internal Controls Over Financial Reporting
118
118
119
119
119
119
119
119
120
120
120
120
122
122
123

4


INTRODUCTION
 
In this Annual Report on Form 20-F (this “Annual Report”), “Company,” “IMC,” “Group,” “we,” “us” and “our” refer to IM Cannabis Corp., its consolidated subsidiaries and Focus Medical Herbs Ltd. (“Focus”), an Israeli private company over which IMC Holdings (as defined herein) exercises “de facto control” under.
 
Information contained in this Annual Report is given as of December 31, 2023, the fiscal year end of Company, unless otherwise specifically stated.
 
Market and industry data used throughout this Annual Report was obtained from various publicly available sources. Although the Company believes that these independent sources are generally reliable, the accuracy and completeness of such information are not guaranteed and have not been verified due to limits on the availability and reliability of raw data, the voluntary nature of the data gathering process and the limitations and uncertainty inherent in any statistical survey of market size, conditions and prospects.
 
Statements made in this Annual Report concerning the contents of any contract, agreement or other document are summaries of such contracts, agreements or documents and are not complete descriptions of all of their terms. If we file any of these documents as an exhibit to this Annual Report, you may read the document itself for a complete description of its terms.
 
Unless otherwise indicated and except for per share data and the information contained under section “B. Compensation”, all dollar figures in this Annual Report are expressed in thousands and all references in this Annual Report to: (i) “dollars” or “CAD” or “$” are to Canadian dollars; (ii) “USD” or “US$” are to United States of America (“U.S.” or “United States”) dollars; (iii) “NIS” are to New Israeli Shekels; and (iv) “” or to “Euros” are to Euros. All intercompany balances and transactions were eliminated on consolidation. Common shares, stock options, units and warrants, and prices, are not expressed in thousands.

References herein to “Q1 2022”, “Q2 2022”, “Q2 2023”, “Q3, 2023” and “Q4 2023” refers to the three months ended March 31, 2022, June 30, 2022, June 30, 2023, September 30, 2023, and December 31, 2023, respectively.

This Annual Report should be read in conjunction with the audited consolidated financial statements of the Company and the notes thereto as at and for the years ended December 31, 2023 and 2022 (the “2023 Annual Financial Statements”) and the accompanying management’s discussion and analysis for the years ended December 31, 2023 and 2022 (the “2023 Annual MD&A”). The 2023 Annual Financial Statements were prepared by management in accordance with the International Financial Reporting Standards (“IFRS”) as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board. IFRS requires management to make certain judgments, estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amount of assets and liabilities at the date of the 2023 Annual Financial Statements and the amount of revenue and expenses incurred during the reporting period. The results of operations for the periods reflected herein are not necessarily indicative of results that may be expected for future periods.

The 2023 Annual Financial Statements, includes the accounts of the Company, its consolidated subsidiaries and Focus, which includes, among others, the following entities:

Legal Entity
Jurisdiction
Relationship with the Company
I.M.C. Holdings Ltd. (“IMC Holdings”)
Israel
Wholly-owned subsidiary
I.M.C. Pharma Ltd. (“IMC Pharma”)
Israel
Wholly-owned subsidiary of IMC Holdings
I.M.C Farms Israel Ltd. (“IMC Farms”)
Israel
Wholly-owned subsidiary of IMC Holdings
Focus Medical Herbs Ltd.* (“Focus”)
Israel
Private company over which IMC Holdings exercises “de facto control” under IFRS 10
R.A. Yarok Pharm Ltd. (“Pharm Yarok”)
Israel
Wholly-owned subsidiary of IMC Holdings
Rosen High Way Ltd. (“Rosen High Way”)
Israel
Wholly-owned subsidiary of IMC Holdings
Revoly Trading and Marketing Ltd. dba Vironna Pharm (“Vironna”)
Israel
Subsidiary of IMC Holdings
Oranim Plus Pharm Ltd.** (“Oranim Plus” and together with IMC Pharma, IMC Farms, Pharm Yarok, Rosen High Way, Vironna and Oranim Plus, the “Israeli Subsidiaries“)
Israel
Subsidiary of IMC Holdings
Adjupharm GmbH (“Adjupharm”)
Germany
Subsidiary of IMC Holdings
Trichome Financial Corp.**
Canada
Wholly-owned subsidiary

*Effective February 26, 2024, IMC Holdings exercised its option to acquire a 74% ownership stake in Focus.
** Discontinued operations. Please see note 25 in the 2023 Annual Financial Statements

Please see Exhibit 8.1 for a complete list of the Company’s subsidiaries.

In this Annual Report, unless otherwise indicated, all references: (i) “Company Subsidiaries” are to the Israeli Subsidiaries and Adjupharm, (ii) “Israeli Operations” are to IMC Holdings and the Israeli Subsidiaries and (iii) “Trichome” are to Trichome Financial Corp. and its subsidiaries.

5


CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
 
This Annual Report, including any documents incorporated by reference herein, contains “forward-looking information” and “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of applicable securities laws (collectively referred to herein as “forward-looking statements”). All statements other than statements of fact may be deemed to be forward-looking statements, including statements with regard to expected financial performance, strategy and business conditions. The words “believe”, “plan”, “intend”, “estimate”, “expect”, “anticipate”, “continue”, or “potential”, and similar expressions, as well as future or conditional verbs such as “will”, “should”, “would”, and “could” often identify forward-looking statements. These statements reflect management’s current beliefs with respect to future events and are based on information currently available to management as of the date of this Annual Report, or a document incorporated by reference therein, including reasonable assumptions, estimates, internal and external analysis and opinions of management considering its experience, perception of trends, current conditions and expected developments as well as other factors that management believes to be relevant as at the date such statements are made.

Without limitation, this Annual Report contains forward-looking statements pertaining to:


the Company’s business objectives and milestones and the anticipated timing of execution;

the performance of the Company’s business, strategies and operations;

the Company’s intentions to expand the business, operations and potential activities of the Company;

the Company’s plans to expand its sales channels, distribution, delivery and storage capacity, and reach to medical cannabis patients;

the competitive conditions of the cannabis industry and the growth of medical or adult-use recreational cannabis markets in the jurisdictions in which the Company operates;

the competitive conditions of the industry, including the Company’s ability to maintain or grow its market share and maintain its competitive advantages;

statements relating to the Company’s commitment to responsible growth and compliance with the strictest regulatory environments;

the Company’s focus on providing premium cannabis products to medical patients in the jurisdictions in which the Company conducts business and any other jurisdiction in which the Company may conduct business in the future;

the Company’s plans to amplify its commercial and brand power to become a global high-quality cannabis player;

the Company’s primary goal of sustainably increasing revenue in its core markets;

the demand and momentum in the Company’s Israeli and Germany operations;

how the Company intends to position its brands;

the efficiencies and synergies of the Company as a global organization with domestic expertise in Israel and Germany;

expectations that providing high-quality, reliable supply to the Company’s customers and patients will lead to recurring sales;

expectations related to the Company’s introduction of new Stock Keeping Units (“SKUs”);

anticipated cost savings from the reorganization of the Company and the completion thereof upon the timelines disclosed herein;

geographic diversification and brand recognition and the growth of the Company’s brands in the jurisdictions that the Company operates in or may expand to;

expectations related to the Company’s ability to address the ongoing needs and preferences of medical cannabis patients;

the Company’s retail presence, distribution capabilities and data-driven insights;

the future impact of the Regulations Amendment (as defined herein) regarding the transition reform from licenses to prescriptions for medical treatment of cannabis;

the Company’s continued partnerships with third party suppliers and partners and the benefits thereof;

the Company’s ability to achieve profitability in 2024;

the number of patients in Israel licensed by the Israeli Ministry of Health (“MOH”) to consume medical cannabis;

expectations relating to the number of patients paying out-of-pocket for medical cannabis products in Germany;

the anticipated decriminalization or legalization of adult-use recreational cannabis in Israel and Germany;

expectations related to the demand and the ability of the Company to source premium and ultra-premium cannabis products exclusively and competition in this product segment;

the anticipated impact of inflation and liquidity on the Company’s performance;

expectations with respect to the Company’s operating budget and the assumptions related thereto;

expectations relating to the Company as a going concern and its ability to conduct business under the ordinary course of operations;

expectations related to the collection the payment awarded in the Judgment and the chances of the claim advancing or the potential outcome of the Test Kits Appeal (as defined herein);

the continued listing of the common shares in the capital of the Company (“Common Shares”) on the Nasdaq Stock Market (“Nasdaq”) and Canadian Securities Exchange (“CSE”);

cannabis licensing in the jurisdictions in which the Company operates;

the renewal and/or extension of the Company’s licenses;

the Company’s anticipated operating cash requirements and future financing needs;

the Company’s expectations regarding its revenue, expenses, profit margins and operations;

the expected increase in revenue and margins in its Israeli medical cannabis market activities arising from its acquisitions;

future opportunities for the Company in Israel, particularly in the retail and distribution segments of the cannabis market;

future expansion and growth opportunities for the Company in Germany and Europe and the timing of such;

contractual obligations and commitments.; and

the Company completing the Potential Transaction with Kadimastem (each as defined herein).

6


With respect to the forward looking-statements contained in this Annual Report, the Company has made assumptions regarding, among other things:
 

the Company has the ability to achieve its business objectives and milestones under the stated timelines;

the Company will succeed in carrying out its business, strategies and operations;

the Company will realize upon its intentions to expand the business, operations and potential activities of the Company;

the Company will expand its sales channels, distribution, delivery and storage capacity, and reach to medical cannabis patients;

the competitive conditions of the cannabis industry and the growth of medical or adult-use recreational cannabis in the jurisdictions in which the Company operates;

the competitive conditions of the industry will be favorable to the Company, and the Company has the ability to maintain or grow its market share and maintain its competitive advantages;

the Company will commit to responsible growth and compliance with the strictest regulatory environments;

the Company will remain focused on providing premium cannabis products to medical patients in the jurisdictions in which the Company conducts business and any other jurisdiction in which the Company may conduct business in the future;

the Company has the ability to amplify its commercial and brand power to become a global high-quality cannabis player;

the Company will maintain its primary goal of sustainably increasing revenue in its core markets;

the demand and momentum in the Company’s Israeli and Germany operations will be favorable to the Company;

the Company will carry out its plans to position its brands as stated;

the Company’s Company has the ability to realize upon the stated efficiencies and synergies the Company as a global organization with domestic expertise in Israel and Germany;

providing a high-quality, reliable supply to the Company’s customers and patients will lead to recurring sales;

the Company will introduce of new SKUs;

the Company will realize the anticipated cost savings from the reorganization;

the Company has the ability to achieve geographic diversification and brand recognition and the growth of the Company’s brands in the jurisdictions that the Company operates in or may expand to;

the Company’s has the ability to address the ongoing needs and preferences of medical cannabis patients;

the Company has the ability to realize upon its retail presence, distribution capabilities and data-driven insights;

the future impact of the Regulations Amendment will be favorable to the Company;

the Company will maintain its partnerships with third parties, suppliers and partners;

the Company has the ability to achieve profitability in 2024;

the accuracy of number of patients in Israel licensed by the MOH to consume medical cannabis;

the accuracy of the number of patients paying out-of-pocket medical cannabis products in Germany;

the anticipated decriminalization or legalization of adult-use recreational cannabis in Israel and Germany will occur;

the Company has the ability to source premium and ultra-premium cannabis products exclusively and competition in this product segment;

the anticipated impact of inflation and liquidity on the Company’s performance will be as forecasted;

the accuracy with respect to the Company’s operating budget and the assumptions related thereto;

the Company will remain as going concern;

a favorable outcome with respect to the collection the payment awarded in the Judgment and the chances of the claim advancing or the potential outcome of the Test Kits Appeal;

the Company’s Common Shares will remain listed on the Nasdaq and CSE;

the Company’s ability to maintain cannabis licensing in the jurisdictions in which the Company operates;

the Company has the ability to obtain the renewal and/or extension of the Company’s licenses;

the Company has the ability to meet operating cash requirements and future financing needs;

the Company will meet or surpass its expectations regarding its revenue, expenses, profit margins and operations;

the Company will increase its revenue and margins in its Israeli medical cannabis market activities arising from its acquisitions;

the Company has the ability to capitalize on future opportunities for the Company in Israel, particularly in the retail and distribution segments of the cannabis market;

the Company will carry out its future expansion and growth opportunities for the Company in Germany and Europe and the timing of such;

the Company will fulfill its contractual obligations and commitments; and

the Company will complete the Proposed Transaction with Kadimastem.

7


Readers are cautioned that the above lists of forward-looking statements and assumptions are not exhaustive. Since forward-looking statements address future events and conditions, by their very nature they involve inherent risks and uncertainties. Actual results may differ materially from those currently anticipated or implied by such forward-looking statements due to a number of factors and risks. These include:
 

the Company’s inability to achieve its business objectives and milestones under the stated timelines;

the Company inability to carry out its business, strategies and operations;

the Company’s inability to realize upon its intentions to expand the business, operations and potential activities of the Company;

the Company will not expand its sales channels, distribution, delivery and storage capacity, and reach to medical cannabis patients;

the competitive conditions of the cannabis industry and the growth of medical or adult-use recreational cannabis markets will be unfavorable to the Company in the jurisdictions in which the Company operates;

the competitive conditions of the industry will be unfavorable to the Company, and the Company’s inability to maintain or grow its market share and maintain its competitive advantages;

the Company will not commit to responsible growth and compliance with the strictest regulatory environments;

the Company’s inability to remain focused on providing premium cannabis products to medical patients in the jurisdictions in which the Company conducts business and any other jurisdiction in which the Company may conduct business in the future;

the Company inability to amplify its commercial and brand power to become a global high-quality cannabis player;

the Company will not maintain its primary goal of sustainably increasing revenue in its core markets;

the demand and momentum in the Company’s Israeli and Germany operations will be unfavorable to the Company;

the Company will not carry out its plans to position its brands as stated;

the Company’s inability to realize upon the stated efficiencies and synergies of the Company as a global organization with domestic expertise in Israel and Germany;

providing a high-quality, reliable supply to the Company’s customers and patients will not lead to recurring sales;

the Company will not introduce of new SKUs;


8



the Company’s inability to realize upon the anticipated cost savings from the reorganization;

the Company’s inability to achieve geographic diversification and brand recognition and the growth of the Company’s brands in the jurisdictions that the Company operates in or may expand to;

the Company’s inability to address the ongoing needs and preferences of medical cannabis patients;

the Company’s inability to realize upon its retail presence, distribution capabilities and data-driven insights;

the future impact of the Regulations Amendment will be unfavorable to the Company;

the Company will not maintain its partnerships with third party suppliers and partners;

the Company’s inability to achieve profitability in 2024;

the inaccuracy of number of patients in Israel licensed by the MOH to consume medical cannabis;

the inaccuracy of the number of patients paying out-of-pocket for medical cannabis products in Germany;

the anticipated decriminalization or legalization of adult-use recreational cannabis in Israel and Germany will not occur;

the Company’s ability to source premium and ultra-premium cannabis products exclusively and competition in this product segment;

the anticipated impact of inflation and liquidity on the Company’s performance will not be as forecasted;

the inaccuracy with respect to the Company’s operating budget and the assumptions related thereto;

the Company will not remain as going concern;

an unfavorable outcome of the negotiations or the Construction Proceedings;

an unfavorable outcome with respect to the collection the payment awarded in the Judgment and the chances of the claim advancing or the potential outcome of the Test Kits Appeal;

the Company’s Common Shares will not remain listed on the Nasdaq and CSE;

the Company’s inability to maintain cannabis licensing in the jurisdictions in which the Company operates;

the Company’s inability to obtain the renewal and/or extension of the Company’s licenses;

the Company’s inability to meet operating cash requirements and future financing needs;

the Company will not meet or surpass its expectations regarding its revenue, expenses, profit margins and operations;

the Company will not increase its revenue and margins in its Israeli medical cannabis market activities arising from its acquisitions;

the Company’s ability to capitalize on future opportunities for the Company in Israel, particularly in the retail and distribution segments of the cannabis market;

the Company will not carry out its future expansion and growth opportunities for the Company in Germany and Europe and the timing of such;

the Company will not fulfill its contractual obligations and commitments; and

the Company will not complete the Proposed Transaction with Kadimastem.
 
The foregoing list of risk factors is not exhaustive. Additional information on these and other factors that could affect the business, operations or financial results of the Company are detailed under the heading “Risk Factors” in this Annual Report. Unless otherwise indicated, forward-looking statements in this Annual Report describe our expectations as of the date of this Annual Report. The Company and management caution readers not to place undue reliance on any forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date made. Although the Company believes that the expectations reflected in the forward-looking statements are reasonable, it can give no assurance that such expectations will prove to have been correct. The Company and management assume no obligation to update or revise them to reflect new events or circumstances except as required by applicable securities laws.

Additional information about the assumptions, risks and uncertainties of the Company’s business and material factors or assumptions on which information contained in forward-looking statements is based is provided in the Company’s disclosure materials, including in the Annual MD&A under “Legal and Regulatory – Risk Factors”, available on the Company’s profile on SEDAR+ at www.sedarplus.ca and on EDGAR at www.sec.gov/edgar.


9

CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FUTURE ORIENTED FINANCIAL INFORMATION
 
This Annual Report may contain future oriented financial information (“FOFI”) within the meaning of Canadian securities legislation and analogous U.S. securities laws, about prospective results of operations, financial position or cash flows, based on assumptions about future economic conditions and courses of action, which FOFI is not presented in the format of a historical balance sheet, income statement or cash flow statement. The FOFI has been prepared by management to provide an outlook of the Company’s activities and results and has been prepared based on a number of assumptions including the assumptions discussed under the heading above entitled “Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements” and assumptions with respect to the costs and expenditures to be incurred by the Company, capital expenditures and operating costs, taxation rates for the Company and general and administrative expenses. Management does not have, or may not have had at the relevant date, firm commitments for all of the costs, expenditures, prices or other financial assumptions which may have been used to prepare the FOFI or assurance that such operating results will be achieved and, accordingly, the complete financial effects of all of those costs, expenditures, prices and operating results are not, or may not have been at the relevant date of the FOFI, objectively determinable.
 
Importantly, the FOFI contained in this Annual Report are, or may be, based upon certain additional assumptions that management believes to be reasonable based on the information currently available to management, including, but not limited to, assumptions about: (i) the future pricing for the Company’s products, (ii) the future market demand and trends within the jurisdictions in which the Company may from time to time conduct the Company’s business, (iii) the Company’s ongoing inventory levels, and operating cost estimates, and (iv) the Company’s financial results for 2024. The FOFI or financial outlook contained in this Annual Report do not purport to present the Company’s financial condition in accordance with IFRS as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board, and there can be no assurance that the assumptions made in preparing the FOFI will prove accurate. The actual results of operations of the Company and the resulting financial results will likely vary from the amounts set forth in the analysis presented in any such document, and such variation may be material (including due to the occurrence of unforeseen events occurring subsequent to the preparation of the FOFI). The Company and management believe that the FOFI has been prepared on a reasonable basis, reflecting management’s best estimates and judgments as at the applicable date. However, because this information is highly subjective and subject to numerous risks including the risks discussed under the heading above entitled “Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements” and under the heading “Risk Factors” in the Company’s public disclosures, FOFI or financial outlook within this Annual Report should not be relied on as necessarily indicative of future results.
 
Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on the FOFI, or financial outlook contained in this Annual Report. Except as required by Canadian securities laws and analogous U.S. securities laws, the Company does not intend, and does not assume any obligation, to update such FOFI.
 
10

 
PART I
 
ITEM 1.          IDENTITY OF DIRECTORS, SENIOR MANAGEMENT AND ADVISERS
 
Not applicable.
 
ITEM 2.          OFFER STATISTICS AND EXPECTED TIMETABLE
 
Not applicable.
 
ITEM 3.          KEY INFORMATION
 
A.          Reserved.
 
B.          Capitalization and Indebtedness
 
Not applicable.
 
C.          Reasons for the Offer and Use of Proceeds
 
Not applicable.
 
D.          Risk Factors
 
The Company’s operations and financial performance are subject to the normal risks of its industry and are subject to various factors which are beyond the control of the Company. Certain of these risk factors are described below. The risks described below are not the only ones facing the Company. Additional risks not currently known to the Company, or that it currently considers immaterial, may also adversely impact the Company’s business, operations, financial results or prospects, should any such other events occur.
 
Risks Relating to Our Business
 
There are certain risks associated with owning securities of the Company that holders should carefully consider. The risks and uncertainties below are not the only risks and uncertainties facing the Company. Additional risks and uncertainties not presently known to the Company or that the Company currently considers immaterial may also impair the business, operations and future prospects of the Company, cause the price of its securities to decline and cause future results to differ materially from those described herein. If any of the following risks actually occur, the business of the Company may be harmed, and its financial condition and results of operations may suffer significantly. In that event, the trading price of the Company’s securities could decline, and holders may lose all or part of their investment.
 
The cannabis-related business and activities of the Group are heavily regulated in all jurisdictions where it carries on business. The Group’s operations are subject to various laws, regulations and guidelines by governmental authorities, particularly the MOH, and the Federal Opium Agency of Germany’s Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices in Germany (“BfArM”), relating to the grow, propagate, manufacture, marketing, management, transportation, storage, distribution, sale, pricing and disposal of dried and fresh cannabis, cannabis plants and seeds, edible cannabis, cannabis extracts, clones and plants and cannabis extracts. The Group’s operations are also subject to laws and regulations relating to health and safety, insurance coverage, the conduct of operations and the protection of the environment.

11

 
The Company consolidates certain financial results under IFRS 10 and any failure to maintain common control could result in a material adverse effect on the business, results of operations and financial condition of the Company
 
The Company complies with IFRS 10, which applies a single consolidation model using a definition of “control” that requires an investor (as defined in IFRS 10) to consolidate an investee (as defined in IFRS 10) where: (i) the investor has power over the investee; (ii) the investor has exposure or rights to variable returns from involvement with the investee; and (iii) the investor can use its power over the investee to affect the amount of the investor’s returns.
 
The Company analyzed the terms of the contractual agreements with Focus in accordance with IFRS 10 to conclude whether it should continue to consolidate the accounts of Focus in its financial statements.
 
Under IFRS 10, consolidation occurs when an investor can exercise control over an investee. Control is achieved through voting rights or other evidence of power. Where there are no direct holdings, under IFRS 10, an investor (as defined in IFRS 10) should consider other evidence of power and ability to unilaterally direct an investee’s (as defined in IFRS 10) relevant activities. In view of the contractual agreements and the guidance in IFRS 10, notwithstanding that the Company has no direct or indirect ownership of Focus, it has sufficient rights to unilaterally direct the relevant activities (a concept known as “de facto control”), mainly due to the following:
 
1)
the Company receiving economic benefits from Focus (and the terms of the Commercial Agreements (as defined herein) cannot be changed without the approval of the Company);
 
2)
the Company having the option to purchase the divested 74% interest in Focus held by Oren Shuster, the Chief Executive Officer, director and a promoter of the Company, and Rafael Gabay, a former consultant director, a former consultant and a promoter of the Company;
 
3)
Messrs. Shuster and Gabay each being a director of Focus (while Mr. Shuster concurrently being a director, officer and substantial shareholder of the Company and Mr. Gabay concurrently being a substantial shareholder of the Company); and
 
4)
the Company providing management and support activities to Focus through the Services Agreement (as defined herein).
 
Accordingly, under IFRS 10, the Company has “de facto control” over Focus, and therefore consolidates the financial results of Focus in the Company’s financial statements.
 
Any failure of the Company or Messrs. Oren Shuster and Rafael Gabay to maintain “de facto control” over Focus as defined under IFRS 10 could alter the Company’s consolidation model, potentially resulting in a material adverse effect on the business, results of operations and financial condition of the Company.
 
For the period ended December 31, 2023, the Company analyzed the terms of the definitive agreements with each of its Consolidated Entities (as defined within IFRS 10) in accordance with accounting criteria IFRS 10. Viewed as effectively exercising control over their Consolidated Entities, the Company consolidate the financial results of the Consolidated Entities as of the date of signing each such definitive agreement.
 
The regulatory authorities in Israel may determine that the Company is in contravention of Israeli cannabis regulations
 
There is a risk that regulatory authorities in Israel may determine that the Company is in contravention of Israeli cannabis regulations. Namely, prior approval of the Israeli Medical Cannabis Agency (“IMCA”) is required for any shareholder owning 5% or more of an Israeli company licensed to engage in cannabis-related activities. Any contravention of Israeli cannabis regulations could jeopardize the good standing of the Company’s licenses. Such a determination may adversely affect the Company’s ability to conduct sales and marketing activities and could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, operating results or financial condition.
 
The Company is subject to governmental regulations in the markets in which it operates and any delays in obtaining, or failure to obtain regulatory approvals could significantly delay the development of markets and products and could have a material adverse effect on the business, results of operations, financial condition and prospects of the Company

12

 
Israel – MOH Regulation
 
Laws and regulations, applied generally, grant government agencies and self-regulatory bodies broad administrative discretion over the activities of the Israeli Subsidiaries and Focus, which can include the power to limit or restrict business activities, the import and export of cannabis products and the imposition of additional quality criteria and disclosure requirements on the products and services provided by Israeli Subsidiaries and Focus. Achievement of the Israeli Subsidiaries and Focus business objectives are contingent, in part, upon compliance with regulatory requirements enacted by these governmental authorities and obtaining all regulatory approvals, where necessary, for the production and sale of its products.
 
The Company cannot predict the time required for the Israeli Subsidiaries or Focus to secure all appropriate regulatory approvals for the products and activity, or the extent of testing and documentation that may be required by governmental authorities. Any delays in obtaining, or failure to obtain regulatory approvals would significantly delay the development of markets and products and could have a material adverse effect on the business, results of operations, financial condition and prospects of the Company.
 
Failure to comply with the laws and regulations applicable to its operations may lead to possible sanctions including the revocation or imposition of additional conditions on licenses to operate the Israeli Subsidiaries and/or the Focus business, the suspension or expulsion from a particular market or jurisdiction or of its key personnel, and the imposition of fines and censures. To the extent that there are changes to the existing laws and regulations or the enactment of future laws and regulations that affect the sale or offering of the Israeli Subsidiaries and/or Focus products or services in any way, this could have a material adverse effect on the business, results of operations, financial condition and prospects of the Company.
 
Germany – BfArM Regulation
 
Legalization

At the end of March 2024, legalization in Germany applies only to cannabis stemming from cultivation for medicinal purposes under state control and in preparations as finished medicinal products, in accordance with the Narcotic Convention. Currently, the production, distribution, exportation and importation of medical cannabis products in Germany is legal, subject to regulations and licensing requirements while operations involving adult-use recreational cannabis products remain illegal. Medical cannabis in Germany must comply with the corresponding monographs of the German and European pharmacopoeia. Nevertheless, current German government has declared in the coalition agreement its intention to open up the German market also in the adult-use recreational market. Medical cannabis in Germany must comply with the corresponding monographs of the German and European pharmacopoeia. This legislative amendment is now set to come into force on 1 April 2024 and will enable limited home cultivation as well as cultivation via so-called cultivation associations. This change in the law also means that medical cannabis will no longer be classified as a narcotic and will therefore no longer be covered by the Narcotics Act ("BtMG") but by the Medical Cannabis Act ("MedCanG").
 
At the end of March 2024, the import, export, manufacturing and distribution of medical cannabis currently requires a wholesale permit pursuant to the German Medicines Act (the “AMG”) and a distribution permit for narcotics pursuant to the BtMG (from 1 April, when the MedCanG comes into force, this would then be used instead of the BtMG to obtain an additional licence). All BtMG permit applications must specify the strains and estimated quantities of medical cannabis involved and any subsequent changes must be reported to the BopSt as division of the BfArM. The import of medical cannabis from other European Union (“EU”) and non-EU countries requires quantity-based import licenses pursuant to the BtMG (comparable regulations also exist under the MedCanG). In addition, if medical cannabis is to be imported that has already undergone processing steps that fall under the EU GMP guidelines, compliance with these guidelines must be confirmed by a European inspection and certificate. The importing company also requires an import and manufacturing authorisation in accordance with the AMG in order to import these goods.
 
Until now, the cultivation of medicinal cannabis was only possible under public procurement law. Such an award procedure was ultimately only carried out once in full. In this context, the BfArM formed a cannabis division to oversee the cultivation, harvesting, processing, quality control, storage, packaging and distribution to wholesalers, pharmacists and manufacturers (the “Cannabis Agency”). The Cannabis Agency also regulates pricing of German-produced medical cannabis products and serves as an intermediary of medical cannabis product sales between manufacturers, wholesalers and pharmacies on a non-profit basis. The Cannabis Agency has no influence on the actual retail price of medical cannabis products in general. It only controlled the price of medicinal cannabis grown in Germany. The responsibilities of the Cannabis Agency are based on the requirements of the Narcotic Convention. The Cannabis Agency is not responsible for the import of medical cannabis products and will therefore neither purchase nor distribute imported medical cannabis products. As a wholesaler, the Cannabis Agency sells German-based medical cannabis products in its own name. The Cannabis Agency contracted with a distributor that was selected in a tender procedure and commissioned it to carry out the distribution of medical cannabis products in accordance with all pharmaceutical and narcotic legal requirements in Germany. Once the MedCanG comes into force, cultivation will no longer be based on tenders but can be applied for in a completely regular authorisation procedure.
 
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The current regime (and also based on the MedCanG) permits the importation of cannabis plants and plant parts for medicinal purposes grown in a country under state control subject to the requirements under the Narcotic Convention. Pursuant to Narcotic Convention, Germany must estimate the expected demand of medical cannabis products for medical and research purposes for the following year and report such estimates to the International Narcotics Control Board.
 
As a prerequisite to obtaining a German import license, the supplier must grow and harvest in compliance with EU-GACP-Guidelines and manufacture in compliance with EU-GMP-Guidelines and certifications. All medical cannabis products imported to Germany must derive from plant material cultivated in a country whose regulations comply with the Narcotic Convention and must comply with the relevant monographs described in the German and European pharmacopeias. While these requirements also apply to the exportation of medical cannabis products, the current German regime does not allow domestically cultivated medical cannabis products to be directly sold to commercial entities other than the Cannabis Agency. Medical cannabis products imported pursuant to an import license under the BtMG (and MedCanG) and AMG permits are sold exclusively to wholesalers and pharmacies. Only the pharmacies are authorised for final dispensing to patients on a prescription basis as ‘magistral preparations’, a term used in Europe to refer to medical products prepared in a pharmacy in accordance with a medical prescription for an individual patient. In addition to magistral preparations, medical cannabis products are also marketable as pre-packaged, licensed drugs.
 
Failure to comply with the laws and regulations applicable to the Company's operations may lead to possible sanctions, including revocation or suspension of licences (and thus the Company's inability to operate), recalls and withdrawals (both regulatory and as a result of competition law proceedings), the loss of eligibility as a corporate body of a corporation or as a medicinal product or narcotics law functionary (and thus the Company's inability to operate), flanked by administrative fines for regulatory offences, fines and imprisonment for criminal offences as well as administrative orders (requirements, prohibitions, etc.) as well as competition law warnings and proceedings (such as injunctions).

The Company’ ability to produce, store, import, distribute and sell cannabis and derivative products in Israel, Canada and Germany is dependent on licensing and any failure to maintain the respective licenses would have a material adverse impact on the business, financial condition and operating results of the Company
 
Israel – Reliance on the Israeli Licenses
 
The Company’s ability to produce, store, import, distribute and sell cannabis in Israel is dependent on the Israeli Subsidiaries and Focus maintaining the Israeli Licenses with the IMCA. Failure to comply with the requirements or any failure to maintain the Israeli Licenses would have a material adverse impact on the business, financial condition and operating results of the Company. There can be no guarantees that the IMCA will extend or renew any of Israeli Licenses as necessary or, if it extended or renewed, that any of the Israeli Licenses will be extended or renewed on the same or similar terms. Should the IMCA not extend or renew any of Israeli Licenses or should it renew any of the Israeli Licenses on different terms, the business, financial condition and results of the operations of the Company would be materially adversely affected.
 
Germany – Reliance on the Adjupharm Licenses
 
The Company’s ability to produce and distribute cannabis through Adjupharm’s certification as an EU-GMP and EU-GDP producer and distributor in Germany with wholesale, narcotics handling, manufacturing, procurement, storage and distribution authority is granted by German regulatory authorities. Failure to comply with the requirements of the BfArM issued licenses or any failure to maintain their respective licenses would have a material adverse impact on the business, financial condition and operating results of the Company.
 
The Company relies on licensed facilities in Israel and Germany to conduct its operations and any adverse changes or developments affecting such facilities could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects
 
Israel – Reliance on the Company’s Facilities

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The Israeli Facilities
 
The Israeli Licenses are specific to each respective facility holding such license and therefore both the license and the facility must remain in good standing for each of the Company’s pharmacies (Virona, Oranim Plus and R.A Pharm Yarok, together the “Israeli Pharmacies”) and the Company’s trading house to be able to conduct the Israeli cannabis activities authorized thereunder (the facilities of the Israeli Pharmacies and trading house, together” “Israeli Facilities”). Adverse changes or developments affecting the Israeli Facilities, including but not limited to the failure to maintain all requisite regulatory and ancillary permits and licenses, the failure to comply with state or municipal regulations, or a breach of security, could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.
 
Any breach of any lease agreement relevant to the operations of the Israeli Facilities or any failure to renew such lease agreements, on materially similar or more favorable terms, may also have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.
 
Germany – Reliance on Logistics Center
 
The Company’s EU-GMP logistics centre in Germany (the “Logistics Center”) allows Adjupharm to manage all aspects of its supply chain including the production, the repackaging and distribution of bulk medical cannabis. Any breach of regulatory requirements, including any failure to comply with recommendations or requirements arising from inspections by government regulators, could also have an impact on Adjupharm’s ability to maintain the licenses and/or keep the Logistics Center in good standing, and to continue operating it under the licenses, could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.
 
The Company relies in Germany and in Israel on various supply and distribution agreements with third-parties, such as cannabis cultivators, packaging suppliers, service providers and distribution partners. The loss of such suppliers and/or service providers and/or distributors and/or their timely service would have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business and operational results
 
Israel – Supply, Manufacture and Distribution Agreements
 
Focus and the Israeli Subsidiaries rely on and are substantially dependent on various supply agreements with third-party cannabis cultivators in Israel and Canada, imported cannabis products, manufacture and packaging agreements and distribution agreements to fulfill the supply requirements of its distribution and sales agreements with pharmacies in the Israeli medical cannabis market. The Israeli Subsidiaries and Focus acquire cannabis from third parties in amounts sufficient to operate its business. However, there can be no assurance that there will continue to be a supply of cannabis available for the Company to purchase to operate or expand. Additionally, the price of cannabis and other inputs may rise which would increase the cost of goods. If any suppliers fail to supply any contracted materials to Focus or the Israeli Subsidiaries, the Israeli Subsidiaries and Focus may fail to meet purchase commitments from their distribution partners. If the Company were unable to acquire the cannabis or other inputs required to operate or expand or to do so on favorable terms or fail to maintain the manufacture agreements with IMC-GMP manufacture companies, it could have a material adverse impact on the Company’s business, financial condition and results of operations. If any of the Company’s suppliers fails to provide inputs meeting the Company’s quality standards, it may need to source cannabis or other inputs from other suppliers, which may result in additional costs and delay in the delivery of its products and services to distributors, pharmacies and patients. There is no assurance that suppliers will be able to supply and deliver the required materials to the Company in a timely manner or that the materials they supply to the Company will not be defective or substandard. Any delay in the delivery of materials, or any defect in the materials, supplied to the Company may materially and adversely affect or delay its production schedule and affect its product quality. Consequently, the Company relies on the suppliers of such supply agreements to provide necessary cannabis products to Focus and the Israeli Subsidiaries. If the Company cannot secure cannabis of similar quality and at reasonable prices from alternative suppliers in a timely manner, or at all, Focus or the Israeli Licensed may not be able to deliver its products to distributors, pharmacies or patients on time with the required quality. The various suppliers and distributors may elect, at any time, to breach or otherwise cease to participate in supply, service or distribution agreements, or other relationships, upon which the Company’s operations rely. Loss of its suppliers, service providers or distributors or their timely service would have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business and operational results.
 

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Germany – Reliance on Supply and Distribution Agreements in Germany
 
Adjupharm relies on its sales and distribution agreements to supply IMC-branded products to distribution partners in Germany, which are then distributed to German pharmacies for sales to medical cannabis patients and on direct sales by Adjupharm of IMC-branded products to German pharmacies.
 
Adjupharm relies on supply agreements with cannabis cultivators and producers to meet the demands of their respective sales agreements with distribution partners and pharmacies. Consequently, the Company relies on the suppliers of such supply agreements to provide necessary cannabis products to Adjupharm. If any suppliers fail to supply any contracted materials to Adjupharm, Adjupharm may fail to meet purchase commitments from their distribution partners and this could result a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, financial and operational results.
 
There can be no assurances that income tax laws or the interpretation thereof in any of the jurisdictions in which the Company operates will not be changed or interpreted or administered in a manner which adversely affects the Company and its shareholders
 
The Company is subject to the provisions of the ITA12 and to review by CRA13. The Company files its annual tax compliance based on its interpretation of the Income Tax Act (the “ITA”) and Canada Revenue Agency’s (the “CRA”) guidance. There is no certainty that the returns and tax position of the Company will be accepted by CRA as filed. Any difference between the Company’s tax filings and CRA’s final assessment could impact the Company’s results and financial position.
 
There can be no assurance that income tax laws or the interpretation thereof in any of the jurisdictions in which the Company operates will not be changed or interpreted or administered in a manner which adversely affects the Company and its shareholders. In addition, there is no assurance that CRA will agree with the manner in which the Company calculates taxes payable or that any of the other tax agencies will not change their administrative practices to the detriment of the Company or its shareholders.
 
If operational cash flows continue to be negative, the Company may be required to fund future operations with alternative financing options such as offerings of shares
 
During the year ended December 31, 2023, the Company had negative cash flows from operating activities. There is no assurance that the Company will generate positive cash flows from its future operating activities. If operational cash flows continue to be negative, the Company may be required to fund future operations with alternative financing options such as offerings of shares.
 
The Company may not be able to secure the funds necessary to implement its strategies, which could cause significant delays in carrying out business objectives or result in a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, financial condition, operational results and prospects
 
There is no assurance that the Company will be able to secure the funds necessary to implement its strategies. Additional debt incurred by the Company from engagements such as major acquisitions may cause the Company’s debt level to increase and result in difficulties in completing or negotiating future debt financings. Any triggering of credit defaults or failure to raise capital by the Company may cause significant delays in carrying out business objectives or result in a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, financial condition, operational results and prospects.
 
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Increased competition could materially and adversely affect the business, financial condition and results of operations of the Group
 
There is potential that the Group will face intense competition from other companies or groups of companies, some of which can be expected to have more financial resources, industry, manufacturing and marketing experience than the Group. Because of the early stage of the industry in which the Group operates, as well as evolving legislation and governmental initiatives in several jurisdictions, the Group expects to face additional competition from new entrants in the jurisdictions in which it currently operates or is contemplating operations. If the number of users of medical cannabis products in Israel and Europe increases, the demand for products in such areas will increase and the Company expects that competition will become more intense, as current and future competitors begin to offer an increasing number of diversified products and pricing strategies. Increased competition by larger and better-financed competitors could materially and adversely affect the business, financial condition and results of operations of the Group.
 
The Group’s business and operating results may be hindered by applicable restrictions on promotion marketing and advertising activities imposed by regulatory authorities
 
The development of the Group’s business and operating results may be hindered by applicable restrictions on promotion marketing and advertising activities imposed by the MOH or BfArM. If the Group is unable to effectively market its products and compete for market share, or if the costs of compliance with government legislation and regulation cannot be absorbed through the selling price for its products, the Group’s sales and operating results could be adversely affected.
 
The cannabis industry is undergoing rapid growth and substantial change, which has resulted in an increase in competitors, consolidation and formation of strategic relationships that could cause a material adverse effect on the business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects of the Group
 
The cannabis industry is undergoing rapid growth and substantial change, which has resulted in an increase in competitors, consolidation and formation of strategic relationships. It is possible that industry maturation could create larger companies that may have increased geographic scope. Such acquisitions or other consolidating transactions could harm the Group in several ways, including the loss of strategic partners (if they are acquired by or enter into relationships with a competitor), customers, or revenue and market share, all of which could harm the Group’s operating results. The Group’s operating results could also be harmed if the Group was forced to expend greater resources to meet new or additional competitive threats. Additional competition from larger, better-financed competitors with geographic advantages could outcompete the Group by placing downward pressure on retail prices for products and services. This could ultimately cause a material adverse effect on the business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects of the Group.
 
The Group is vulnerable to the political, economic, legal, social, regulatory, and military conditions affecting Israel and the Middle East that could have a material adverse effect on the Group’s business, results of operations, financial condition and prospects
 
The Group is vulnerable to the political, economic, legal, regulatory, and military conditions affecting Israel and the Middle East. Armed conflicts between Israel and its neighbouring countries and territories occur periodically in the region and may adversely affect the Group’s business, results of operations and financial condition. In addition, the Group may be adversely affected by other events or factors affecting Israel such as the interruption or curtailment of trade between Israel and its trading partners, or any restrictions or pressure on the Group’s partners or customers or others to prevent or discourage them from doing business activities with Israel or Israeli businesses, a significant downturn in the economic or financial condition of Israel, a significant downgrading of Israel’s internal credit rating, labour disputes and political instability, including riots, uprisings and government failures. Restrictive laws or policies directed towards Israel or Israeli businesses could have a material adverse effect on the Group’s business, results of operations, financial condition and prospects.
 
From April 2019 until March 2021, Israel held four general elections as efforts to compose and approve a new government failed to find lasting success. As a result, the Israeli government was unable to pass a budget for fiscal year 2021 and many legislative matters were delayed. In December of 2022, Israel’s new government took office as a result of a coalition of six political parties; however, the continued uncertainty surrounding future elections and/or the results of such elections in Israel may continue. Actual or perceived political instability in Israel or any negative changes in the political environment, may individually or in the aggregate adversely affect the Israeli economy and, in turn, the Group’s business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

17

 
Any armed conflicts, terrorist activities or political instability in the region could adversely affect business conditions, could harm the Group’s results of operations, and could make it more difficult for us to raise capital. Parties with whom the Group does business may decline to travel to Israel during periods of heightened unrest or tension, forcing the Group to make alternative arrangements when necessary, in order to meet our business partners face to face. In addition, the political and security situation in Israel may result in parties with whom we have agreements involving performance in Israel claiming that they are not obligated to perform their commitments under those agreements pursuant to force majeure provisions in such agreements. Further, in the past, the State of Israel and Israeli companies have been subjected to economic boycotts. Several countries still restrict business with the State of Israel and with Israeli companies. These restrictive laws and policies may have an adverse impact on our operating results, financial condition or the expansion of our business.
 
Furthermore, under Israeli law, citizens and permanent residents of Israel are obligated to perform military reserve duty for extended periods of time and are subject to being called to active duty at any time under emergency circumstances. In response to increased hostilities, there have been periods of significant call-ups of military reservists. It is possible that there will be additional call-ups in the future, which may include officers and key personnel of the Group’s, which could disrupt business operations for a significant period of time.
 
On October 7, 2023, a war between the terror organization Hamas and Israel began. The war has had an impact on the Company's business operations, which may or may not continue in the short and long term. The Company has experienced damages to its ability to function, affecting various aspects, including employees, supplies, imports, sales, and more. While there are damages, it is still too early to fully assess the extent of their impact. However, the first and certain effect of the war is the postponement of the medical cannabis reform, which was initially set to commence on December 29, 2023. It is possible that there will be additional call-ups in the future, which may include officers and key personnel of the Group’s, which could disrupt business operations for a significant period of time.The Company may not be able to continue as a going concern
 
The Group’s current operating budget includes various assumptions concerning the level and timing of cash receipts from sales and cash outlays for operating expenses and capital expenditures, including cost saving plans and restructuring actions taken in 2022 and 2023. The Company is managing its cash flow daily and will look for external funding for its operations. The Company’s board of directors (the “Board”) approved a cost saving plan, implemented in whole or in part, to allow the Company to continue its operations and meet its cash obligations. The cost saving plan consists of cost reduction due to efficiencies and synergies, which include mainly the following steps: discontinuing operation of loss-making activities, reduction in payroll and headcount, reduction in compensation paid to key management personnel (including layoffs of key executives), operational efficiencies and reduced capital expenditures.
 
These conditions raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. The 2023 Annual Financial Statements do not include any adjustments relating to the recoverability and classification of assets or liabilities that might be necessary should the Company be unable to continue as a going concern.
 
The Company is subject to certain credit exposure
 
The maximum credit exposure as of December 31, 2023, is the carrying amount of cash and cash equivalents, accounts receivable and other current assets. The Company does not have significant credit risk with respect to customers. All cash and cash equivalents are placed with major Israeli financial institutions.
 
Loan receivable credit risk is managed by each loan separately according to the Company’s policy, procedures and control relating to the borrower’s credit risk management. At the end of each period, the individual loan values are assessed based on a credit risk analysis.
 
The expected credit loss analysis is generally based on management’s understanding of the borrower’s experience/integrity, financial health, business plans, capacity, products, customers, contracts, competitive advantages/disadvantages, and other pertinent factors when assessing credit risk. This would also include the assessment of the borrower’s forecasts as well as taking into consideration any security and/or collateral the Company has on the outstanding balance.
 
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Conflict and political instability in eastern Europe and Israel could negatively affect the Group’s revenues and capital markets activity
 
The first part of 2023 has seen significantly higher levels of volatility in global markets due to market participants' reactions to, and uncertainty surrounding, the magnitude and timing of government and central bank action to be taken in response to heightened inflation, as well as Russia's ongoing presence in Ukraine. This volatility has resulted in a decline in the level of activity in the financial markets. Continued market volatility or uncertainty related to actions taken or to be taken by central banks, a decline in the global macroeconomic outlook, including as a result of Russia's ongoing presence in Ukraine and the threat, or outbreak of more widespread armed conflict in Eastern Europe could cause financial market activity to continue to decrease, which would negatively affect the Group’s revenues and capital markets activity.
 
The Group is also vulnerable to political, economic, legal, regulatory, and military conditions affecting Israel and Middle East. Armed conflicts between Israel and its neighbouring countries and territories occur periodically in the region which may adversely affect the Group’s business, results of operations and financial condition. In addition, the Group may be adversely affected by other events or factors affecting Israel such as the interruption or curtailment of trade between Israel and its trading partners, or any restrictions or pressure on the Group’s partners, customers or others to prevent or discourage them from doing business activities with Israel or Israeli businesses, a significant downturn in the economic or financial condition of Israel, a significant downgrading of Israel’s internal credit rating, labour disputes and political instability, including riots, uprisings and government failures. Restrictive laws or policies directed towards Israel or Israeli businesses could have a material adverse effect on the Group’s business, results of operations, financial condition and prospects.
 
Any armed conflicts, terrorist activities or political instability in the region could adversely affect business conditions, could harm the Group’s results of operations, and could make it more difficult for us to raise capital. Parties with whom the Group does business may decline to travel to Israel during periods of heightened unrest or tension, forcing the Group to make alternative arrangements when necessary in order to meet our business partners face to face. In addition, the political and security situation in Israel may result in parties with whom we have agreements involving performance in Israel claiming that they are not obligated to perform their commitments under those agreements pursuant to force majeure provisions in such agreements. Further, in the past, the State of Israel and Israeli companies have been subjected to economic boycotts. Several countries still restrict business with the State of Israel and with Israeli companies. These restrictive laws and policies may have an adverse impact on our operating results, financial condition or the expansion of our business.
 
Furthermore, under Israeli law, citizens and permanent residents of Israel are obligated to perform military reserve duty for extended periods of time and are subject to being called to active duty at any time under emergency circumstances. In response to increased hostilities, there have been periods of significant call-ups of military reservists.
 
Political risk in the markets in which the Group operates could have a material adverse effect on the Group’s business, financial condition, operating results and prospects
 
Political risk is an additional risk that the Group may be exposed to when operating in Israel and Europe markets. Examples of political risk include without limitation social unrest, threats or occurrences of war, organized crime, political instability, changes of government and changes in taxation policies in domestic and international markets and jurisdictions in which the Group operates.
 
While the Group actively analyzes risks and developments in markets that it currently or will participate in, there is no assurance that unpredicted impacts will not occur. Depending on the magnitude of such unpredicted impacts, there may be a material adverse effect on the Group’s business, financial condition, operating results, and prospects.

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The Group may not be able to effectively or successfully address macroeconomic risks and uncertainties or successfully implement operating strategies to mitigate the impact of such risks and uncertainties, which could materially harm the Group’s business
 
Global economies are currently experiencing elevated inflation which could curtail levels of economic activity, including in our primary production markets. This inflation is predominantly driven by costs of goods as input costs continue to increase with the overall increase in costs caused by several external factors including but not limited to general uncertainties caused by global supply chain constrictions, rising energy prices and the global COVID-19 pandemic. As such, delivery and distribution costs, utility costs and other necessary supplies at an economic cost cannot be assured. These are integral requirements for the Group’s business and it is reasonable to expect that inflation, supply shortages or increases in demand could impact the Group’s future economic performance and competitiveness, as it may entail a meaningful increase in costs for various goods and services that the Group may not be able to pass onto patients or customers. In addition, the operations of the Group could be affected by the economic context should interest rates, inflation or unemployment levels reach levels that consumer trends and spending and, consequently, impact the sales and profitability of the Group. The Group may not be able to effectively or successfully address such risks and uncertainties or successfully implement operating strategies to mitigate the impact of such risks and uncertainties. In the event that the Group fails to do so, such failure could materially harm the Group’s business.
 
The Group’s facilities are subject to the risk of theft of its product and other security breaches, which could have an adverse effect on the Group’s business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects
 
Due to the nature of the Group’s products and the limited legal channels for distribution, the Israeli Facilities and the Logistics Center of the Group is subject to the risk of theft of its product and other security breaches. A security breach in any one of the Group’s facilities and external cultivation, manufacturing and storage facilities possessing of the Company’s products could result in a significant loss of available product and as a result decrease in sales, revocation of cannabis licenses, exposure to additional liability under applicable regulations and to potentially costly litigation or increased expenses relating to insurance premiums and other resolutions and future prevention of security breaches, any of which could have an adverse effect on the Group’s business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.
 
In Israel, the Group stores products in the Israeli Pharmacies and other pharmacies not owned by the Group, instead it is stored with Israeli trade houses, and external service providers such as cultivation, manufacturing, and storage partners. In addition, in Germany, the Group stores products in the Logistics Center before distribution. Pursuant to the applicable Israeli and German licensing requirements, the Israeli Subsidiaries and Adjupharm are required to maintain certain standards of storage for cannabis products. The risk of inventory theft from these facilities is mitigated by the Israeli Subsidiaries and Adjupharm through the implementation of the security measures required under applicable laws, such as usage of qualified storage units, designated storage locations, locked storage vaults, access control, security cameras, and alert systems. Notwithstanding such security measures, any breaches of security may result in losses of inventory, potential litigation, and increased costs to bolster security and insurance.
 
The Group relies on business licenses, permits and approvals and the failure to maintain any of these licenses, permits and approvals could have a material adverse effect on the business, financial condition and results of the operations of the Group
 
The Group is dependent on ancillary business licenses, permits and approvals granted by government authorities or other third parties in order to operate effectively including, without limitation, building permits, municipal permits, third-party licenses including distributors and suppliers, and foreign trade licenses. Should the Group fail to maintain any of these licenses, permits and approvals, or should it fail to renew any of such licenses, permits and approvals on materially similar or more favorable terms, the business, financial condition and results of the operations of the Group may be subject to a material adverse effect.
 
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Violations of securities laws and breaches of fiduciary duty could result in civil liability, fines, sanctions, or the suspension or revocation of the Group’s right to carry on its existing business
 
Given the nature of the Group’s business, it may from time to time be subject to claims or complaints from investors or others in the normal course of business. The legal risks facing the Group, its directors, officers, employees, or agents in this respect include potential liability for violations of securities laws, breach of fiduciary duty or misuse of investors’ funds. Violations of securities laws and breach of fiduciary duty could result in civil liability, fines, sanctions, or the suspension or revocation of the Group’s right to carry on its existing business. The Group may incur significant costs in connection with such potential liabilities.
 
The Group and its investees’ operations are subject to various laws, regulations and guidelines, and any potential noncompliance could cause the business, financial condition and results of operations of the Group to be adversely affected
 
The Group and its investees’ operations are subject to various laws, regulations and guidelines. The Group endeavours to and cause its investees to comply with all relevant laws, regulations and guidelines. However, there is a risk that the Group’s and its investees’ interpretation of laws, regulations and guidelines, including, but not limited to applicable stock exchange rules and regulations, may differ from each other, and the Group and its investees’ operations may not be in compliance with such laws, regulations and guidelines. Any potential noncompliance could cause the business, financial condition and results of operations of the Group to be adversely affected. Further, any amendment to or replacement of cannabis legislations and applicable rules and regulations governing the activities of the investees may cause adverse effects to the Group’s operations. The risks to the business of the Group associated with the decision to amend or replace cannabis legislation and regulation, could reduce the addressable market for the Group’s products and could materially and adversely affect the business, financial condition and results of operations of the Group.
 
The Group and its investees incur ongoing costs and obligations related to regulatory compliance. Failure to comply with applicable laws and regulations may result in enforcement actions thereunder, including orders issued by regulatory or judicial authorities causing operations to cease or be curtailed, and may include corrective measures requiring capital expenditures or remedial actions. Parties may be liable for civil or criminal fines or penalties imposed for violations of applicable laws or regulations. Amendments to current laws, regulations and permitting requirements, or more stringent application of existing laws or regulations, may have a material adverse impact on the Group’s and/or its investees, resulting in increased capital expenditures or production costs, reduced levels of cannabis production or abandonment or delays in the development of facilities which could have a material adverse effect on the business, results of operations and financial condition of the Group.
 
The introduction of new tax laws, regulations or rules, or changes to, or differing interpretations of, or application of, existing tax laws, regulations or rules in any of the countries in which the Group invests could result in an increase in the Group’s taxes, or other governmental charges, duties or impositions. No assurance can be given that new tax laws, regulations or rules will not be enacted or that existing tax laws, regulations or rules will not be changed, interpreted or applied in a manner which could result in the Group’s profits being subject to additional taxation or which could otherwise have a material adverse effect on the Group.
 
The Group’s operations are subject to a variety of laws, regulations, and guidelines, and any changes to such laws, regulations or guidelines could have a material adverse effect on the business, results of operations, financial condition and prospects of the Group
 
The Group’s operations are subject to a variety of laws, regulations, and guidelines relating to the marketing, acquisition, manufacture, management, distribution (including import and export), transportation, storage, sale, and disposal of cannabis products. The Group’s operations are also subject to laws and regulations relating to health and safety, insurance coverage, the conduct of operations and the protection of the environment. Any changes to such laws and regulations that are beyond the control of the Group could have a material adverse effect on the business, results of operations, financial condition, and prospects of the Group.
 
21


Any failure to successfully manage growth and integrate acquired businesses may result in a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, financial condition, operating results and prospects
 
The Company may be subject to growth related risks including capacity constraints and pressure on its internal systems and controls. The ability of the Company to manage growth effectively will require it to continue to implement and improve its operational and financial systems and to expand, train and manage its employee base. If the Company is unable to deal with this growth, any negative impact may have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, financial condition, results of operation and prospects.
 
In addition, the realization of the benefits of acquisitions made by the Company, including the acquisition of certain operations from Panaxia, the Israeli Pharmacies and the trading house of Rosen High Way, depend in part on successfully consolidating functions and integrating and leveraging operations, procedures and personnel in a timely and efficient manner as well as the Company’s ability to share knowledge and realize revenues, synergies and other growth opportunities from combining the acquired businesses and operations with those of the Company. The integration of acquired businesses may depend on a number of factors, including without limitation: (i) the input of substantial management effort, time and resources; (ii) the successful incorporation of key personnel from acquired companies for post-acquisition periods. Any failure in successfully integrating acquired businesses may result in a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, financial condition, operating results and prospects. The risks we face in connection with an acquisition include:
 

diversion of management time and focus from operating our business to addressing acquisition integration challenges;

coordination of research and development and sales and marketing functions;

retention of employees from the acquired company;

cultural challenges associated with integrating employees from the acquired company into our organization;

integration of the acquired company's accounting, management information, human resources, and other administrative systems;

the need to implement or improve controls, procedures, and policies at a business that prior to the acquisition may have lacked effective controls, procedures, and policies;

potential write-offs of intangible assets or other assets acquired in transactions that may have an adverse effect on our operating results in a given period;

liability for activities of the acquired company before the acquisition, including patent and trademark infringement claims, violations of laws, commercial disputes, tax liabilities, and other known and unknown liabilities; and

litigation or other claims in connection with the acquired company, including claims from terminated employees, consumers, former stockholders, or other third parties.

Ability to meet target production capacity may result in a material adverse effect on the Group’s business, financial condition
 
The Group’s sales capabilities are subject to estimates in target production capacity. These estimates may prove to be inaccurate due to uncontrollable external factors such as genetic drifts in strain of plants grown and general difficulties in estimating growth of cannabis plants and also unexpected delays in product supply by third party cultivation partners and importation due to reasons related to regulation and the supplier and operational constrains. Any adverse misalignments between the target production capacity and actual production capacity may result in a material adverse effect on the Group’s business, financial condition.
 
The Group’s operations are subject to environmental and occupational safety laws and regulations, any failure to comply with such environmental and occupational safety laws and regulations could have a material adverse effect on the business, results of operations and financial condition of the Group
 
The Group’s operations are subject to environmental and occupational safety laws and regulations in certain jurisdictions, concerning, among other things, emissions and discharges to water, air and land, the handling and disposal of hazardous and nonhazardous materials and wastes, and employee health and safety. The Group incurs ongoing costs and obligations related to compliance with environmental and employee health and safety matters. Any failure to comply or maintain compliance with environmental and occupational safety laws and regulations may result in additional costs for corrective measures, penalties or restrictions on manufacturing operations and could have a material adverse effect on the business, results of operations and financial condition of the Group.

22

 
The failure to secure suppliers or distribution partners could have a material adverse effect on the Group’s business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.
 
The Group’s success depends on its ability to secure suppliers and distribution partners. There are many factors which could impact the Group’s ability to secure suppliers and distribution partners, including but not limited to IMC and other brand awareness, the Group’s ability to continually produce desirable and effective cannabis products, compliance with regulatory requirements in connection with import and export of cannabis products, and the successful implementation of new partnership plans. The failure to secure suppliers or distribution partners could have a material adverse effect on the Group’s business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.
 
The Group relies on key business inputs and any failure to secure required supplies and services or to do so on appropriate terms could also have a material adverse effect on the business, financial condition, and operating results of the Group
 
The Group’s business is dependent on a number of key inputs and their related costs including raw materials and supplies related to its growing and distribution operations as well as electricity, water, and other utilities. Any significant interruption or negative change in the availability or economics of the supply chain for key inputs (e.g. rising energy costs) could cause a material adverse effect on the business, financial condition, and operating results of the Group. Any failure to secure required supplies and services or to do so on appropriate terms could also have a material adverse effect on the business, financial condition, and operating results of the Group.
 
The failure to effectively compete in the Group’s markets and introduce new product offerings may cause a material adverse effect on the Group’s business, results of operations, financial condition and prospects
 
In addition to being subject to general business risks applicable to a business involving an agricultural product and a regulated consumer product, the Group will need to make investments in its business strategy. These investments include the procurement of raw material, new cannabis strains supplier and distributor outreach projects, marketing efforts and research and development projects. The Group expects that competitors will undertake similar investments to compete with it. Competitive conditions, third-party partner preferences, patient requirements and spending patterns in this industry and market are relatively unknown and may have unique circumstances that differ from other existing industries and markets and contribute to unsuccessful future business development or expansion efforts by the Group or other undesirable consequences. As a result, the Group may not be successful in its efforts to secure suppliers or distribution partners or to develop new cannabis products and produce and distribute these cannabis products. In addition, these activities may require significantly more resources than the Company currently anticipates in order to be successful.
 
Any new cannabis products that the Group develops or distributes may be subject to time-intensive regulatory approval procedures that might delay any release schedules or lead to adverse market conditions that might affect product profitability. The Group may ultimately fail to effectively bring new product offerings to market for reasons that include, but are not limited to, stringent regulatory approval procedures. Any inability to introduce new product offerings may cause a material adverse effect on the Group’s business, results of operations, financial condition and prospects.
 
The Group relies on international third-party transportation services to deliver and receive product-related shipments, which may cause delays and impact the Group’s profitability
 
The Group relies on international third-party transportation services to deliver and receive product-related shipments. In the process of the deliveries, time delays, labor strikes, COVID-19-related issues, Israel-Hamas war related issues, product storage issues or other logistical problems may occur and force late delivery or receipt of items or receipt of damaged items. Such delays, receipt of damaged items or other logistical problems may cause a material adverse effect on the Group’s business, operations or financial condition. Rising costs associated with courier services used by the Group may also adversely impact the business of the Group and its ability to operate profitably.
 
In addition, any breach of security of the products’ package during the possession of the third-party transportation service may result in violations of regulations regarding possession of cannabis products and thus may have a material adverse effect on the Group’s business, financial condition and operating results.

23

 
In pursuit of new opportunities in the cannabis industry, the Company may fail to select appropriate investment candidates and negotiate acceptable arrangements, which could adversely affect the Company’s ability to enter into new investments
 
As part of the Company’s business strategy, it seeks new opportunities in the cannabis industry. In pursuit of such opportunities, the Company may fail to select appropriate investment candidates and negotiate acceptable arrangements. The Company cannot provide assurance that it can complete any investment that it pursues or is pursuing, on favorable terms, or that any investment completed will ultimately benefit the Company. In addition, the Company’s capital solutions may not attract a following in the cannabis industry. In the event that the Company chooses to raise debt capital to finance any acquisition or other arrangement, the Company’s leverage will be increased. In addition, the introduction of new tax laws or regulations, or accounting rules or policies, or rating agency policies, or changes to, or differing interpretations of, or application of, existing tax laws or regulations or accounting rules or policies or rating agency policies, could make the productivity and services offered by the Company less attractive to investees. Such changes could adversely affect the Company’s ability to enter into new investments.
 
Strategic alliances that the Group enters into could present unforeseen integration obstacles or costs, may not enhance the Group’s business, and may involve risks that could adversely affect the Group
 
The Group may enter into further strategic alliances with third parties that it believes will complement or augment its existing business. The Group’s ability to complete strategic alliances is dependent upon, and may be limited by, the availability of suitable candidates and capital. In addition, strategic alliances could present unforeseen integration obstacles or costs, may not enhance the Group’s business, and may involve risks that could adversely affect the Group, including significant amounts of management time that may be diverted from investment activities operations to pursue and complete such transactions or maintain such strategic alliances. Future strategic alliances could result in the incurrence of additional debt, costs and contingent liabilities, and there can be no assurance that future strategic alliances will achieve the expected benefits to the Group’s business or that the Group will be able to consummate future strategic alliances on satisfactory terms, or at all.
 
While the Company conducts due diligence with respect to investees, there are risks inherent in any investment. Specifically, there could be unknown or undisclosed risks or liabilities of investees for which the Company is not or will not be sufficiently indemnified. Any such unknown, undisclosed or unmitigated risks or liabilities could materially and adversely affect the Company’s financial performance and results of operations. The Company could encounter additional transaction and enforcement related costs or other factors such as the failure to realize all of the benefits from its investments. Any of the foregoing risks and uncertainties could have a material adverse effect on Group’s business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
Unfavorable divestments could have a material adverse effect on the Company
 
In certain circumstances, the Company may decide, or be required, to divest any of its direct or indirect interests in certain investees. In particular, if any of the investees violate any applicable laws and regulations, the Company may be required to divest its indirect or direct interest in such investee or risk significant fines, penalties, administrative sanctions, convictions or settlements. There is no assurance that these divestitures will be completed on terms favorable to the Company, or at all. Any opportunities resulting from these divestitures, and the anticipated effects of these divestitures on the Company may never be realized, or may not be realized to the extent the Company anticipates. Any required divestiture or an actual or perceived violation of applicable laws or regulations could have a material adverse effect on the Company, including its reputation and ability to conduct business, its holdings (directly or indirectly) in the investees, the listing of its securities on applicable stock exchanges, its financial position, operating results, profitability or liquidity or the market price of its publicly traded shares. In addition, it is difficult for the Company to estimate the time or resources that may be required for the investigation of any such matters or its final resolution because, in part, the time and resources that may be needed are dependent on the nature and extent of any information requested by the applicable authorities involved, and such time or resources could be substantial.
 

24

 
The Company relies upon the ability, judgment, discretion and good faith of key personnel, and the inability to attract, develop, motivate and retain highly qualified employees could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, financial condition and results of operations
 
The Company has relied upon the ability, judgment, discretion and good faith of its executive management team. The Company’s future success depends on its continuing ability to attract, develop, motivate and retain highly qualified employees, especially its key personnel. If the Company were to lose any members of the executive management or key employees, any inability to find suitable replacements at reasonable costs may have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, financial condition and results of operations. Further, certain key personnel of the Company are subject to a security clearance by IMCA. There is no assurance that any of the Company’s key personnel who presently or may in the future require a security clearance will be able to obtain or renew such clearances or that new personnel who require a security clearance will be able to obtain one. A failure by any of those individuals to maintain or renew his or her security clearance, could result in a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, financial condition and results of operations. In addition, if any such individual leaves the Company, and the Company is unable to find a suitable replacement that has a security clearance required by applicable law, or at all, there could occur a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
The Group relies on international advisors and consultants for its operations in foreign countries
 
The legal, regulatory, tax and accountant requirements in the foreign countries in which the Group may invest or operate in with respect to the cultivation and sale of cannabis, banking systems and controls, as well as local business culture and practices are different from those in Canada. The Group’s officers and directors must rely, to a great extent, on local legal and financial counsels and consultants in order to keep abreast of material legal, regulatory and governmental developments as they pertain to and affect the Group’s business operations, and to assist with governmental relations. The Group must rely, to some extent, on those members of management and the Board who have previous experience working and conducting business in these countries, if any, in order to enhance the Group’s understanding of and appreciation for the local business culture and practices. The Group also relies on the advice of local experts and professionals in connection with current and new regulations that develop in respect of the cultivation and sale of cannabis as well as in respect of banking, financing, labour, litigation and tax matters in these jurisdictions. Any developments or changes in such legal, regulatory or governmental requirements or in local business practices are beyond the Group’s control. The impact of any such changes may cause a material adverse effect to the Group’s business, financial condition, operating results and prospects.
 
Foreign market participation subjects the Group to the global capital markets and government authorities, which could have a material adverse effect on the Group’s business, financial condition and results of operations
 
Global capital markets have also recently experienced extreme volatility which may, in conjunction with the factors set out above and despite the actions of government authorities, contribute to a worsening of general economic conditions including, rising interest rates, high levels of inflation and unemployment, the unavailability of credit or the devaluation of currencies. Unexpected changes in these factors and financial market and economic conditions Group’s financial condition, profitability and cash flows, and may also have a negative effect on the valuation of, and the ability of the Group to exit or partially divest from, investment positions. Depending on conditions, the Group may incur substantial realized and unrealized losses in future periods, all of which may materially adversely affect its results of operations and the value of any investment in the Group.

25

 
The Group continues to monitor developments and policies in the foreign markets in which it operates or invests and assess the impact thereof to its operations; however, such developments cannot be accurately predicted. The realization of any of these risks may significantly impair the Group’s local operations and have a material adverse effect on the Group’s business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
These risks may also limit or disrupt the Group’s strategic alliances or investments, restrict the movement of funds, increase the Group’s costs, or result in the deprivation of contract rights or the taking of property by nationalization or expropriation without fair compensation, and may have a material adverse effect on the Group’s financial position and/or results of operations. In addition, the enforcement by the Group of its legal rights in foreign countries, including rights to exploit properties or utilize permits and licenses and contractual rights may not be recognized by the court systems in such foreign countries or enforced in accordance with the rule of law.
 
Future acquisitions or dispositions could result in the failure to realize anticipated benefits of such transactions
 
Material acquisitions, dispositions and other strategic transactions involve a number of risks, including but not limited to the potential disruption of the Group’s ongoing business, distraction of management, the Company may become more financially leveraged, the failure to realize anticipated benefits of those transactions fully or at all, or may take longer to realize than expected, and loss or reduction of control over certain Group assets.
 
Despite the Company’s due diligence efforts, the presence of one or more material liabilities of an acquired company that are unknown to the Company at the time of acquisition could have a material adverse effect on the business, results of operations, prospects and financial condition of the Company. A strategic transaction may result in a significant change in the nature of the Company’s business, operations and strategy. In addition, the Company may encounter unforeseen obstacles or costs in implementing a strategic transaction or integrating any acquired business into the Company’s operations.
 
In addition, the Company’s strategic transaction decisions are based on the economic assessments made by the Company and its external advisors. Such economic assessments involve a series of assumptions regarding factors such as future cannabis prices, production requirements, expected revenue growth, cash flow and financing requirements, future capital expenditures and operating costs. Many of these factors are subject to change and are beyond the control of the Company. In addition, future acquisition or international expansion could require the Group to incur a number of up-front expenses, including those associated with obtaining regulatory approvals, as well as additional ongoing expenses, including those associated with infrastructure, buildout, staff and regulatory compliance. If there is any significant negative change in any of these factors, the Group may experience a material adverse effect on its business, financial condition, operating results and prospects.
 
Foreign expansion efforts and operations could subject the Group to additional business risks, and the potential failure of the Group’s operating infrastructure to support such expansions could result in operational failures and regulatory fines or sanctions
 
The Group’s expansion into foreign jurisdictions is subject to additional business risks, including new or unexpected risks or could significantly increase the Group’s exposure to one or more existing risk factors, including economic instability, changes in laws and regulations, and the effects of competition, as well as operational, regulatory, compliance and reputational and foreign exchange rate risk. The failure of the Group’s operating infrastructure to support such expansions could result in operational failures and regulatory fines or sanctions. Additionally, there is no guarantee that the Group will be able to realize any of the anticipated benefits of any transactions related to the Group expansion strategy.
 
The Company has no U.S. operations
 
The Company and, to its knowledge, its subsidiaries do not currently engage in any U.S. cannabis-related activities as defined in Canadian Securities Administrators’ Staff Notice 51-352 (Revised) - Issuers with U.S. Marijuana-Related Activities (“CSA Staff Notice 51-352”). To date, the Company has caused its investees to only conduct business and invest in entities in federally-legal jurisdictions by including appropriate representations, warranties and covenants in its agreements with investees. However, an investee may breach such obligations. Any such violation of such obligation would result in a breach of the applicable agreement and, accordingly, may have a material adverse effect on the business, operations and financial condition of Company.

26


The Company is subject to risks inherent in the agricultural business
 
The Company’s business involves the growing of cannabis products by third party suppliers, which are agricultural products. As such, the business is subject to the risks inherent in the agricultural business, such as pests, plant diseases and similar agricultural risks. Although, the third-party cultivators the Company partners with carefully monitor the growing conditions with trained personnel and applicable equipment, there can be no assurance that natural elements will not have a material adverse effect on the production of its products and results of operations. Any decline in production could have a material adverse effect on the Group’s business, operating results or financial condition.
 
Illegal market competition in the cannabis market could have a material adverse effect on Group’s business, operating results and prospects
 
As a participant of the cannabis market in international jurisdictions with varying regulations, the Group may be subject to competition from entities that conduct illegal cannabis business operations. Such entities may resort to competitive measures such as producing products with prohibited concentrations of Delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol (“THC”) and industrial Hemp-based cannabidiol (“CBD”) or producing imitations of the Group’s products without the authorization or endorsement of the Group. If demand for these illegal products increases and local governments fail to regulate markets accordingly, the Group may experience a material adverse effect on its business, operating results and prospects.
 
Consumer perception of the Group’s products can be significantly influenced by scientific research or findings, regulatory investigations, litigation, media attention and other publicity regarding the consumption of medical cannabis products
 
The Group believes the medical cannabis industry is highly dependent upon consumer perception regarding the safety, efficiency and quality of the medical cannabis products produced. Consumer perception of the Group’s products can be significantly influenced by scientific research or findings, regulatory investigations, litigation, media attention and other publicity regarding the consumption of medical cannabis products.
 
There can be no assurance that future scientific research, findings, regulatory proceedings, litigation, media attention or other research findings or publicity will be favorable to the medical cannabis market or any particular product, or consistent with earlier publicity.
 
Future research reports, findings, regulatory proceedings, litigation, media attention or other publicity that are perceived as less favorable than, or that question, earlier research reports, findings or publicity could have a material adverse effect on the demand for products bearing the brands marketed and sold by the Group and the business, results of operations, financial condition, prospects and the Group’s cash flows.
 
Further, adverse publicity reports or other media attention regarding the safety, efficacy and quality of medical cannabis products in general, or the Group’s products specifically, or associating the consumption of medical cannabis products with illness or other negative effects or events, could have a material adverse effect. Such adverse publicity reports or other media attention could arise even if the adverse effects associated with such products resulted from consumers’ failure to consume such products appropriately or as directed.
 
Group’s products could have certain side effects if not taken as directed or if taken by an end user that has certain known or unknown medical conditions
 
If the products the Group sells are not perceived to have the effects intended by the end user, its business may suffer. There is little long-term data with respect to efficacy, unknown side effects and/or interaction with individual human biochemistry of various cannabis products. As a result, the Group’s products could have certain side effects if not taken as directed or if taken by an end user that has certain known or unknown medical conditions.

27

 
Reputational risk to third parties could result in the failure to establish or maintain business relationships
 
The parties outside of the cannabis industry with which the Group does business may perceive that they are exposed to reputational risk as a result of the Group’s cannabis business activities. Failure to establish or maintain business relationships could have a material adverse effect on the Group’s business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.
 
The failure of the Group’s IT systems or a component of IT systems could, depending on the nature of any such failure, adversely impact the Group’s financial condition, operating results and reputation
 
The Group’s operations will depend, in part, on how well it and its supply and distribution partners protect networks, equipment, information technology systems (“IT Systems”) and software against damage from a number of threats, including, but not limited to, cable cuts, damage to physical plants, natural disasters, intentional damage and destruction, fire, power loss, hacking, computer viruses, vandalism and theft. The Group’s operations also will depend on the timely maintenance, upgrade and replacement of networks, equipment, IT Systems and software, as well as pre-emptive expenses to mitigate the risks of failures. Any of these and other events could result in information system failures, delays and/or increase in capital expenses. The failure of IT Systems or a component of IT Systems could, depending on the nature of any such failure, adversely impact the Group’s financial condition, operating results and reputation.
 
Cybersecurity risks could adversely impact the Group’s financial condition, operating results and reputation
 
The Group’s information systems and its third-party service providers and vendors are vulnerable to increasing threat of continually evolving cybersecurity risks, resulting in data breaches and data losses. These risks arising from events including without limitation malware, computer viruses, employee error, extortion, malfeasance, system errors, and hacking. In order to minimize the risk of these events from occurring, the Group is performing timely maintenance, upgrade and replacement of networks, equipment, IT systems and software and other protective measures. However, any failure or delay in maintaining, upgrading or replacing such systems and software could materially increase the risk of cybersecurity incident and data breach or data loss, and the Group may experience operational delays, information system failures, and/or increases in capital expenses. Ultimately, the Group’s business, financial condition, operating results and reputation may be impacted adversely by such occurrences.
 
The Group has not experienced any material losses to date relating to cybersecurity-attacks or other information security breaches, but there can be no assurance that the Group will not incur such losses in the future. The Group’s risk and exposure to these matters cannot be fully mitigated because of, among other things, the evolving nature of these threats. As a result, cyber security and the continued development and enhancement of controls, processes and practices designed to protect systems, computers, software, data and networks from attack, damage or unauthorized access is a priority. As cyber threats continue to evolve, the Group may be required to expend additional resources to modify or enhance protective measures or to investigate and remediate any security vulnerabilities.
 
Any theft of personal information about the Group’s patients and customers or privacy breach could have a material adverse effect on the Group’s business, financial condition and results of operations
 
The Group collects and stores certain personal information about its patients and customers and is responsible for protecting that information from privacy breaches. A privacy breach may occur through certain threats, including, without limitation, procedural or process failure, information technology malfunction, or deliberate unauthorized intrusions, computer viruses, and cyber-attacks. Theft of data for competitive purposes is an ongoing risk whether perpetrated via employee collusion or negligence or through deliberate cyber-attack. Any such theft or privacy breach would have a material adverse effect on the Group’s business, financial condition, and results of operations.

28

 
In addition, there are several Israeli, German and European federal and provincial laws, rules and regulations protecting the privacy and confidentiality of certain patient health information, and private information including patient records, and employee information, and restricting the collection, use transfer, storage, disposal and disclosure of that protected information. The interpretation and enforcement of such laws and regulations are uncertain, are subject to change and may require the Group to incur substantial costs to monitor and implement compliance with any additional requirements.
 
In the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) governs the collection and use of personal data in the EU. The GDPR, which is wide-ranging in scope, will impose several requirements relating to the consent of the individuals to whom the personal data relates, the information provided to the individuals, the security and confidentiality of the personal data, data breach notification and the use of third-party processors in connection with the processing of the personal data. The GDPR also imposes strict rules on the transfer of personal data out of the EU to the U.S., enhances enforcement authority and imposes large penalties for noncompliance, including the potential for fines of up to EUR 20,000 or four percent of the annual global revenues of the infringer, whichever is greater. In addition, certain breaches of the GDPR may result in regulatory investigations, reputational damage and civil lawsuits including class action lawsuits. In the State of Israel, privacy rights and obligations are mainly regulated under the Protection of Privacy Law, 5741-1981 (the “Israeli Privacy Law”) and the regulations promulgated thereunder (mainly the Protection of Privacy (Data Security) Regulations, 5777-2017 and the Protection of Privacy (Transfer of Data Abroad) Regulations, 5761-2001) (the “Israeli Privacy Regulations”). Under the Israeli Privacy Law, ‘information’ and ‘sensitive information’ includes information such as those related to a person’s health, personality, intimate affairs, financial condition, faith and opinions. The Israeli Privacy Law impose obligations related to database registration, notice, disclosure and use restrictions on an ‘owner’ of a database, and the Israeli Privacy Regulations set forth the security measurements to be implemented and the rules related to the transfer of personal information. Violation of the Israeli Privacy Law could lead to a criminal investigation or an administrative enforcement procedure on behalf of the Israeli Privacy Protection Authority, as well as an administrative fine imposed pursuant to the Administrative Offenses Law, 5746-1985. In addition, legal remedies such as statutory compensation of up to NIS 50,000 are available to successful claimants of privacy violations.
 
Additional jurisdictions in which the Group operates or in which it may enter in the future, also have data privacy and security laws and regulations that govern the collection, use, disclosure, transfer, storage, disposal, and protection of sensitive personal information. The interpretation and enforcement of such laws and regulations are uncertain, are subject to change and may require the Group to incur substantial costs to monitor and implement compliance with any additional requirements. Failure to comply with data protection laws and regulations could result in government enforcement actions, litigation and/or adverse publicity and could negatively affect the Group’s operating results, business and prospects.
 
The price of cannabis products is affected by numerous factors beyond the Group’s control
 
The cannabis industry is a margin-based business in which gross profits depend on the excess of sales prices over costs. Consequently, profitability is sensitive to fluctuations in wholesale and retail prices caused by changes in supply (which itself depends on other factors such as weather, fuel, equipment and labour costs, shipping costs, economic situation, government regulations and demand), taxes, government programs and policies for the cannabis industry (including price controls and wholesale price restrictions that may be imposed by government agencies responsible for the sale of cannabis), and other market conditions, all of which are factors beyond the control of the Group. The Group’s operating incomes may be significantly and adversely affected by a decline in the price of cannabis products and will be sensitive to changes in the price of cannabis products and the overall condition of the cannabis industry, as the Group’s profitability is directly related to the price of cannabis products. The price of cannabis products is affected by numerous factors beyond the Group’s control. Any price decline may have a material adverse effect on the Group’s business, financial condition and results of operations.

29

 
Fraudulent or illegal activity may cause a material adverse effect on the Group’s business, reputation, financial condition, and results of operations.
 
The Group’s employees, independent contractors and consultants may expose the Group to additional risk if they engage in fraudulent or other illegal activity prohibited by relevant laws. Although the Group has set preventative measures in place to minimize such fraud or illegal activities from occurring, there is no guarantee that the measures will be effective. If the measures fail and fraud or illegal activities take place, the Group may be subject to lawsuits for failure to comply with regulations and be ordered to pay such penalties as prescribed by the court if found to be in violation. Thus, the occurrence of fraud or illegal activities may cause a material adverse effect on the Group’s business, reputation, financial condition and results of operations.
 
Corruption and anti-bribery law violations could cause severe penalties and other consequences that may have a material adverse effect on its business, reputation, financial condition and results of operations
 
The Group’s business is subject to applicable anti-corruption or anti-bribery laws to which the Group is or may become subject, which generally prohibit companies and employees from engaging in bribery or other prohibited payments to foreign officials for the purpose of obtaining or retaining business. In addition, the Group is subject to the anti-bribery laws of any other countries in which it conducts business now or in the future. The Group’s employees or other agents may, without its knowledge and despite its efforts, engage in prohibited conduct under the Group’s policies and procedures and anti-bribery laws for which the Group may be held responsible. The Group’s policies mandate compliance with these anti-corruption and anti-bribery laws. However, there can be no assurance that the Group’s internal control policies and procedures will always protect it from recklessness, fraudulent behaviour, dishonesty or other inappropriate acts committed by its affiliates, employees, contractors or agents. If the Group’s employees or other agents are found to have engaged in such practices, the Group could suffer severe penalties and other consequences that may have a material adverse effect on its business, reputation, financial condition and results of operations.
 
The Group uses intellectual property protections such as trademarks, trade secrets and contractual confidentiality obligations in order to protect its products, brands and technologies
 
The Group uses intellectual property protections such as trademarks, trade secrets and contractual confidentiality obligations in order to protect its products, brands and technologies. The administrative task of maintaining such protections across multiple jurisdictions can result in high costs to the Group. The Group would also be required to pay for any costs attributed to the enforcement of intellectual property protections. In addition, in any infringement proceeding, some or all of the Group’s intellectual property rights or other proprietary know-how, may be found invalid, unenforceable, anti-competitive or not infringed. An adverse result in any litigation or defense proceedings could create the risk of invalidation or narrow interpretation of the Group’s affected intellectual property rights. Such results could cause a material adverse effect on the Group’s business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.
 
Furthermore, the possession of intellectual property protections does not completely eliminate the risk of litigation. Even with such protections properly registered, the Group is still vulnerable to infringement claims and would be liable for the costs of defending such claims. If the claims succeed, the Group would be liable for the costs of the resulting court orders and may need to negotiate licensing of the intellectual property rights from third-party owners.
 
In addition, despite any intellectual property protections in place, unauthorized parties may attempt to replicate or otherwise obtain and use the Group’s trademarks, know-how, trade secrets, products or technology. Identifying unauthorized use of intellectual property rights is difficult as the Group may be unable to effectively monitor and evaluate the products being distributed by its competitors, including parties such as illegal distributers, and the processes used to produce such products. The Group makes no assurance that it will successfully identify unauthorized replication, acquisition or use of the Group’s trademarks, know-how, trade secrets, products, or technology before the effects of such actions cause a material adverse effect on the Group’s business, financial condition, results of operation and prospects.

30

 
Company is subject to the rules and regulations of the Canadian Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Capital Market
 
The Common Shares and certain warrants of the Company began trading on the CSE on November 5, 2019 and November 19, 2019, respectively. The Common Shares began trading on Nasdaq on March 1, 2021.
 
The Company is subject to the rules and regulations of Nasdaq and CSE. Further, in order to maintain compliance with all continued listing requirements, the Company pays legal, accounting and compliance fees to advisors and regulatory organizations and will have to continue to pay additional fees if its Common Shares remain listed on Nasdaq. Any changes to rules, regulations policies or guidelines issued by regulatory authorities may impact any such fees paid and increase the risk of non-compliance. There is no assurance that the Company will be able to comply with the applicable Nasdaq or CSE continued listing standards within any projected timeframes, or at all, and maintain listing status on either Nasdaq or CSE.
 
In the past, the Company was subject to a deficiency notice from Nasdaq that was resolved via a share consolidation; however, currently, the Company is once against subject to such deficiency and received notice from the Nasdaq. The Company is in the process of satisfying the Nasdaq’s listing deficiencies. Any failure to comply with applicable continued listing requirements and regulations may result in the delisting of the Company’s Common Shares and/or warrants from the CSE and/or the Common Shares from Nasdaq. Such events may have material adverse effects on the Company’s business and financial condition.
 
Significant sales of the Company’s listed securities could depress the market price of the Company’s securities and impair the Company’s ability to raise capital
 
Sales of a substantial number of Common Shares or other equity-related securities in the public markets by the Company or its shareholders could depress the market price of the Company’s securities and impair the Company’s ability to raise capital through the sale of additional equity securities. The Company cannot predict the effect that future sales of Common Shares or other equity-related securities would have on the market price of the Common Shares. The price of the Common Shares could be affected by possible sales of the Common Shares by hedging or arbitrage trading activity.
 
The Company may issue additional securities in the future, which may dilute a shareholder’s holdings in the Company
 
The Company may issue additional securities in the future, which may dilute a shareholder’s holdings, or a holder of a convertible security’s underlying relative interest, in the Company. The Company’s articles permit the issuance of an unlimited number of Common Shares, and shareholders will have no pre-emptive rights in connection with any such further issuance. The directors of the Company have discretion to determine the price and the terms of further issuances, subject to applicable stock exchange policies. Moreover, additional Common Shares will be issued by the Company on the full exercise of stock options, restricted share units and warrants, issued or to be issued by the Company in the future, and the exercise of any resulting convertible securities of such as applicable.
 
The Company’s cash flows and ability to pursue future business and expansion opportunities are dependent on the earnings of its subsidiaries and investees and the distribution of those earnings to the Company
 
IMC is a holding company. Substantially all of the Company’s operating assets are the capital stock of its Subsidiaries and arrangements with investees. Substantially all of the Company’s business is conducted through Subsidiaries or investees, which are separate legal entities. Consequently, the Company’s cash flows and ability to pursue future business and expansion opportunities are dependent on the earnings of its subsidiaries and investees and the distribution of those earnings to the Company. The ability of these entities to pay dividends and other distributions will depend on their operating results and will be subject to applicable laws and regulations which require that solvency and capital standards be maintained by such companies and contractual restrictions contained in the instruments governing their debt. In the event of a bankruptcy, liquidation or reorganization of any of the Company’s Subsidiaries, holders of indebtedness and trade creditors will generally be entitled to payment of their claims from the assets of those subsidiaries before any assets are made available for distribution to the Company.

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The Company has not paid any dividends on the outstanding Common Shares and maintains no current intention to declare dividends in the foreseeable future
 
The Company has not paid any dividends on the outstanding Common Shares, and the Company maintains no current intention to declare dividends on the Common Shares in the foreseeable future. Any decision to pay dividends on the Common Shares in the future will be at the discretion of the Board and will depend on, among other things, the Company’s results of operations, current and anticipated cash requirements and surplus, financial condition, any future contractual restrictions and financing agreement covenants, solvency tests imposed by corporate law and other factors that the Board may deem relevant.
 
The market price of the Company’s Common Shares and warrants may fluctuate, which may have a material adverse effect on the Company’s operations, financial condition and operating results
 
The market price of the Common Shares and warrants may fluctuate to a wide degree as a result of a number of factors, including without limitation market conditions, financial analyst predictions, changes in law, press releases and public filings of the Company, operational activity and results and competitor activity. In particular, the dual-listing of the Common Shares on the CSE and Nasdaq may result in higher volatility as a result of the exposure to both U.S. and Canadian financial market conditions. Overall, such factors, whether related or unrelated to operational performance of the Company, may cause a temporary or non-temporary negative pressure on prices of the Company’s securities or assets. If the negative pressure on prices arising from these factors persist, impairment losses may be recorded and the Company could experience a material adverse effect on its operations, financial condition and operating results.
 
The failure to design, develop or maintain effective internal controls may affect the Company’s ability to prevent fraud, detect material misstatements, and fulfill reporting obligations
 
Effective internal controls are required for the Company to provide reasonable assurance that its financial results and other financial information are accurate and reliable. Any failure to design, develop or maintain effective controls, or difficulties encountered in implementing, improving or remediation lapses in internal controls may affect the Company’s ability to prevent fraud, detect material misstatements, and fulfill our reporting obligations. As a result, investors may lose confidence in the Company’s ability to report timely, accurate and reliable financial and other information, which may expose the Company to certain legal or regulatory actions, thus negatively impacting its business and financial condition, including the liquidity and/or market value of its securities.
 
The possible lack of liquidity of securities may cause difficulty for security holders to re-sell securities at desired prices
 
Despite the listing of the Common Shares and warrants on public exchanges, there is no guarantee to security holders that the securities will be sufficiently liquid to any degree without a substantial decrease in price, particularly if selling significant quantities within a short time frame. Accordingly, there is a possibility that a lack of liquidity may cause difficulty for security holders to re-sell securities at desired prices.
 
The Group’s debtors may default on payments owed to the Group
 
The Group may be owed current or long-term debts such as accounts receivables over the course of its operations. As a result, the Group may be exposed to the risk of debtor defaults on payments as they come due. The Company makes no guarantee on the level of credit risk that it will hold at any given time but intends to minimize this risk as determined by the Board.
 
The Group is subject to the inherent liquidity risk that it will not be able to pay its financial obligations as they become due
 
The Group is subject to the inherent risk that it will not be able to pay its financial obligations as they become due. In light of its recent negative cash flows, the Company monitor liquidity risk carefully and plan its liquid holdings strategically to avoid any payment defaults. The Group’s liquidity risk is the risk that the Group will not be able to meet its financial obligations as they become due. The Group manages its liquidity risk by reviewing its capital requirements on an ongoing basis. Based on the Group's working capital position at December 31, 2023, management considers liquidity risk to be high.

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There is a risk that losses will be incurred by the Group if there is an adverse shift in exchange rates or increases in prevailing interest rates
 
Market risk is the risk that the fair value or future cash flows of a financial instrument will fluctuate because of changes in market prices. Market risk includes exchange rate risk and interest rate risk.
 
Exchange rate risk is the risk of loss arising from changes to foreign exchange rates. As the Group is a party to certain international contracts that require the Group to make or receive payments in foreign currencies, there is a risk that losses will be incurred if there is an adverse shift in exchange rates.
 
Interest rate risk pertains to the risk of loss arising from changes in prevailing interest rates. Any increases in prevailing interest rates may increase interest expenses paid by the Group on any long-term debt.
 
The Company is dependent upon the global capital markets to raise capital by equity or debt financing
 
An economic downturn of the global capital markets has been shown to make the raising of capital by equity or debt financing more difficult. The Company will be dependent upon the capital markets to raise additional financing in the future, while it continues to develop its operations. As such, the Company is subject to liquidity risks in meeting its development and future operating cost requirements in instances where cash positions are unable to be maintained or appropriate financing is unavailable. These factors may impact the Company’s ability to raise equity or obtain loans and other credit facilities in the future and on terms favorable to the Company and its management. If uncertain market conditions persist, the Company’s ability to raise capital could be jeopardized, which could have an adverse impact on the Company’s operations and the trading price of the Company’s securities.
 
Future crises may be precipitated by any number of causes, including natural disasters, public health crises, geopolitical instability, war, natural disasters, changes to energy prices or sovereign defaults. These factors may impact the ability of the Company to obtain equity or debt financing in the future and, if obtained, on terms favorable to the Company. Increased levels of volatility and market turmoil can adversely impact the Group’s operations and the value, and the price of the Common Shares and/or Warrants could be adversely affected.
 
In addition, there is a risk that one or more of the Group’s current service providers may themselves be adversely impacted by difficult economic circumstances, which could have a material adverse effect on the Group’s business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.
 
A judgment against any member of the Group in excess of available insurance coverage could have a material adverse effect on the Group in terms of damages awarded and negatively impact the reputation of the Group
 
The Group maintains various types of insurance which may include product liability insurance, errors and omission insurance, directors and officers’ insurance, trustees’ insurance, property coverage and general commercial insurance. There is no assurance that claims will not exceed the limits of available coverage, that any insurer will remain solvent or willing to continue providing insurance coverage with sufficient limits or at a reasonable cost; or, that any insurer will not dispute coverage of certain claims due to ambiguities in the policies. A judgment against any member of the Group in excess of available coverage could have a material adverse effect on the Group in terms of damages awarded and negatively impact the reputation of the Group.
 
The insurance purchased by the Group cannot cover all risks that the Group is exposed to, and any uninsured amounts of liabilities incurred by member(s) of the Group may be paid directly by such members
 
The insurance purchased by the Group cannot cover all risks that the Group is exposed to. Additionally, some insurance policies are outside of budget limitations and are therefore elected to be excluded. There is no guarantee that any insurance coverage maintained by any member(s) of the Group will sufficiently cover any or all liabilities incurred by that Group member. Any uninsured amounts of liabilities incurred by member(s) of the Group may be paid directly by such members. Accordingly, such direct payments may have a material adverse effect on the Group’s business, results of operations, and financial condition.

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The Group’s products face an inherent risk of exposure to product liability claims, regulatory action and litigation if such products are alleged to have caused significant loss or injury
 
Focus, Adjupharm and the Israeli Subsidiaries are producers, importers, distributors and/or sellers of products designed to be ingested or inhaled by humans. Such products face an inherent risk of exposure to product liability claims, regulatory action and litigation if such products are alleged to have caused significant loss or injury. In addition, the manufacture and sale of such products involve the risk of injury or loss to consumers or patients due to tampering by unauthorized third parties, product contamination, unauthorized use by consumers or patients or other third parties. Previously unknown adverse reactions resulting from human consumption of cannabis products alone or in combination with other medications or substances could occur.
 
The Group may be subject to various product liability claims, including, among others, that products manufactured, imported, distributed, stored or sold by the Group or bearing one of the Group’s brands caused injury, illness or loss, include inadequate instructions for use or include inadequate warnings concerning possible side effects or interactions with other substances. A product liability claim or regulatory action against the Group could result in increased costs, could adversely affect the Group’s reputation with its clients, patients and consumers generally, and could have a material adverse effect on the Group’s results of operations and financial condition.
 
There can be no assurances that the Group will be able to obtain or maintain product liability insurance on acceptable terms or with adequate coverage against potential liabilities. Such insurance is expensive and may not be available in the future on acceptable terms, or at all. The inability to obtain sufficient insurance coverage on reasonable terms or to otherwise protect against potential product liability claims could prevent or inhibit the commercialization of the Group’s products.
 
Members and/or representatives of the Group are or may become parties to litigation from time to time in the ordinary course of business that could adversely affect the Group’s business
 
Certain members and/or representatives of the Group are parties to certain legal proceedings or investigations and certain legal proceedings as described in “Legal Proceedings” below. Should such Group members and/or representatives fail to receive favorable decisions at the conclusion of these legal proceedings or incur significant costs in litigation thereof, the Group’s business, financial condition or operating results may be subject to a material adverse effect.
 
Members and/or representatives of the Group are or may become parties to litigation from time to time in the ordinary course of business that could adversely affect its business. Should any litigation in which the Group members and/or representatives become involved be determined against such Group members and/or representatives, such a decision could adversely affect the Group’s ability to continue operating and the market price for the Common Shares and/or warrants. Even if such Group members and/or representatives are involved in litigation and win, the litigation process can consume significant resources of the Group.
 
A failure of the Group’s quality control systems could result in significant costs incurred in replacing, destroying or repurposing defective inventory, providing replacement products to its customers or recalling such products
 
The quality and safety of the Group’s products and products purchased from third party suppliers are critical to the success of the Group’s business and operations. As such, it is imperative that the Group’s (and its service providers’) quality control systems operate effectively and successfully. Quality control systems can be negatively impacted by the design of the quality control systems, the quality training program, and adherence by employees to quality control guidelines. Although the Group strives to ensure that it and all of its service providers have implemented and adhere to high calibre quality control systems, the Group could experience a significant failure or deterioration of such quality control systems. A failure of the Group’s quality control systems could result in significant costs incurred in replacing, destroying or repurposing defective inventory, providing replacement products to its customers or recalling such products. The Group may be unable to meet customer demand and may lose customers who have to purchase alternative brands or products. In addition, consumers may lose confidence in the Group’s brands whether affected or not and such brand reputation may be materially damaged. Any loss of sales volume from a contamination event may affect the Group’s ability to fulfill its contractual obligations. During this time, the Group’s competitors may benefit from an increased market share that could be difficult and costly to regain.

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If the Group’s products are recalled due to an alleged product defect or for any other reason, the Group could be required to incur the unexpected expense of the recall and any legal proceedings that might arise in connection with the recall and may lose a significant amount of sales
 
Manufacturers and distributors of products are sometimes subject to the recall or return of their products for a variety of reasons, including product defects, such as contamination, unintended harmful side effects or interactions with other substances, packaging safety and inadequate or inaccurate labeling disclosure. If products are recalled due to an alleged product defect or for any other reason, the Group could be required to incur the unexpected expense of the recall and any legal proceedings that might arise in connection with the recall.
 
The Group may lose a significant amount of sales and may not be able to replace those sales at an acceptable margin or at all. In addition, a product recall may require significant management attention.
 
Although the Group has detailed procedures in place for testing finished products, there can be no assurance that any quality, potency or contamination problems will be detected in time to avoid unforeseen product recalls, regulatory action or lawsuits. Additionally, if one of the Group’s significant brands were subject to recall, the image of that brand and the Group could be harmed. A recall for any one of the foregoing reasons could lead to decreased demand for the Group’s products and could have a material adverse effect on the results of operations and financial condition of the Group. Additionally, product recalls may lead to increased scrutiny of the Group’s operations by the applicable regulatory body, including but not limited to MOH or BfArM or other regulatory agencies, requiring further management attention and potential legal fees and other expenses.
 
Inaccuracies in forecasting market conditions could have a material adverse effect on the Group’s business, financial condition and results of operations
 
The Group’s sales forecasts are largely dependent on the Group’s own market research. There is no assurance pertaining to the accuracy of the Group’s predictions regarding the cannabis industry. Any assumptions made in producing forecasts may be inaccurate as a result of external factors that are unpredictable to the Group. Such inaccuracies could have a material adverse effect on the Group’s business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
The Group’s business may be negatively impacted by catastrophic events, natural disasters, severe weather and disease
 
The Group’s business may be negatively impacted by a number of events that are beyond its control, including cyber-attacks, energy blackouts, pandemics, terrorist attacks, acts of war, earthquakes, hurricanes, tornados, fires, floods, ice storms or other catastrophic events. Further, the Group relies on certain suppliers and distribution partners whose businesses may be impacted by the occurrence of any of the foregoing events. Catastrophic events can evolve rapidly and their impacts can be difficult to predict. There can be no assurance that the occurrence of a catastrophic event or the associated consequences will not disrupt the Group’s operations, ability to carry on business or supply and distribution chains. In addition, liquidity and volatility, credit availability, market and financial conditions and cannabis cultivation, supply and distribution conditions, among other critical factors to the Group’s business, could change at any time as a result. These events and any associated consequences may cause a material adverse effect on the business, financial condition and results of operations of the Group. A catastrophic event, including an outbreak of infectious disease, a pandemic or a similar health threat, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, or fear of any of the foregoing, could adversely impact the Group and its ability to maintain normal operations.

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The Group is subject to a variety of anti-money laundering laws and regulations
 
The Group is subject to a variety of laws and regulations domestically and internationally that involve money laundering, financial recordkeeping and proceeds of crime, including any related or similar rules, regulations or guidelines, issued, administered or enforced by governmental authorities internationally. In the event that any of the Group’s investments, or any proceeds thereof, any dividends or distributions therefrom, or any profits or revenues accruing from such investments were found to be contrary to money laundering legislation, such transactions may be viewed as proceeds of crime under one or more of the statutes noted above or any other applicable legislation. This could restrict have a material adverse effect on the Group’s business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
The Group may not be able to effectively enforce security over underlying assets, which could have a material adverse effect on the Group
 
There is no guarantee that the Group will be able to effectively enforce any guarantees, indemnities or other security interests it may have. Should a bankruptcy or other similar event occur that precludes an investee from performing its obligations under an agreement with any member of the Group, the Group would have to enforce its security interest. In the event that the investee has insufficient assets to pay its liabilities, it is possible that other liabilities will be satisfied prior to the liabilities owed to the Group. In addition, bankruptcy or other similar proceedings are often a complex, lengthy and expensive process, the outcome of which may be uncertain and could result in a material adverse effect on the Company.
 
If the Group is unable to enforce its security interests due to any reasons including regulatory reasons related to its cannabis activity, there may be a material adverse effect on the Group.
 
The Company, its officers and directors may be subject to various potential conflicts of interest, which could adversely affect Company operations
 
The Company may be subject to various potential conflicts of interest because of the fact that some of its officers and directors may be engaged in a range of business activities. In some cases, the executive officers and directors may have fiduciary obligations associated with these business interests that interfere with their ability to devote time to the Company and its affairs, and that could adversely affect Company operations. These business interests could require significant time and attention of the Company’s executive officers and directors. In addition, the Company may also become involved in other transactions which conflict with the interests of the Company’s directors and officers who may from time to time deal with persons, firms, institutions or corporations with which the Company may be dealing, or which may be seeking investments similar to those the Company desires. The interests of these persons could conflict with the Company’s interests.
 
In addition, from time to time, these persons may be competing with the Company for available investment opportunities. Conflicts of interest, if any, will be subject to the procedures and remedies provided under applicable laws. In particular, in the event that such a conflict of interest arises at a meeting of directors, a director who has such a conflict will abstain from voting for or against the approval of such participation or such terms. In accordance with applicable laws, directors are required to act honestly, in good faith and in the Company’s best interests.
 
The Company is a foreign private issuer under United States Securities Laws
 
The Company is a “foreign private issuer”, as defined in Rule 405 under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “U.S. Securities Act”), and Rule 3b-4 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”). It is therefore not subject to the same requirements that are imposed upon U.S. domestic issuers by the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”). Under the Exchange Act, the Company is subject to reporting obligations that, in certain respects, are less detailed and less frequent than those of U.S. domestic reporting companies. As a result, the Company does not file the same reports that a U.S. domestic issuer would file with the SEC, although the Company is required to file with or furnish to the SEC the continuous disclosure documents that it is required to file in Canada under Canadian securities laws. In addition, the Company’s officers, directors, and principal shareholders are exempt from the reporting and short-swing profit recovery provisions of Section 16 of the Exchange Act. Therefore, the Company’s shareholders may not know on as timely a basis when the Company’s officers, directors and principal shareholders purchase or sell Common Shares, as the reporting periods under the corresponding Canadian insider reporting requirements are longer.

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As a foreign private issuer, the Company is exempt from the rules and regulations under the Exchange Act related to the furnishing and content of proxy statements. The Company is also exempt from Regulation FD, which prohibits issuers from making selective disclosures of material non-public information. While the Company complies with the corresponding requirements relating to proxy statements and disclosure of material non-public information under Canadian securities laws, these requirements differ from those under the Exchange Act and Regulation FD and shareholders should not expect to receive the same information at the same time as such information is provided by U.S. domestic companies. In addition, the Company may not be required under the Exchange Act to file annual and quarterly reports with the SEC as promptly as U.S. domestic companies whose securities are registered under the Exchange Act.
 
In addition, as a foreign private issuer, the Company has the option to follow certain Canadian corporate governance practices, except to the extent that such laws would be contrary to U.S. securities laws, and provided that the Company discloses the requirements it is not following and describes the Canadian practices it follows instead. The Company may in the future elect to follow home country practices in Canada with regard to certain corporate governance matters. As a result, the Company’s shareholders may not have the same protections afforded to shareholders of U.S. domestic companies that are subject to all corporate governance requirements.
 
Loss of foreign private issuer status under United States securities laws could increase the Company’s regulatory and compliance costs
 
In order to maintain its status as a foreign private issuer, a majority of the Common Shares must be either directly or indirectly owned by non-residents of the U.S. unless the Company also satisfies one of the additional requirements necessary to preserve this status. The Company may in the future lose its foreign private issuer status if a majority of its Common Shares are held in the U.S. and if the Company fails to meet the additional requirements necessary to avoid loss of its foreign private issuer status. The regulatory and compliance costs under U.S. federal securities laws as a U.S. domestic issuer may be significantly more than the costs incurred as a foreign private issuer. If the Company is not a foreign private issuer, it would not be eligible to use the Multijurisdictional Disclosure System or other foreign issuer forms and would be required to file periodic and current reports and registration statements on U.S. domestic issuer forms with the SEC, which are more detailed and extensive than the forms available to a foreign private issuer. In addition, the Company may lose the ability to rely upon exemptions from Nasdaq corporate governance requirements that are available to foreign private issuers.
 
Loss of emerging growth company status under United States securities laws could increase the Company’s regulatory and compliance costs
 
The Company is an “emerging growth company” as defined in section 3(a) of the Exchange Act (as amended by the JOBS Act, enacted on April 5, 2012), and the Company will continue to qualify as an emerging growth company until the earliest to occur of: (a) the last day of the fiscal year during which the Company has total annual gross revenues of US$1,235,000 (as such amount is indexed for inflation every five years by the SEC) or more; (b) the last day of the fiscal year of the Company following the fifth anniversary of the date of the first sale of common equity securities of the Company pursuant to an effective registration statement under the U.S. Securities Act; (c) the date on which the Company has, during the previous three year period, issued more than US$1,000,000 in non-convertible debt; and (d) the date on which the Company is deemed to be a “large accelerated filer”, as defined in Rule 12b–2 under the Exchange Act. The Company will qualify as a large accelerated filer (and would cease to be an emerging growth company) at such time when on the last business day of its second fiscal quarter of such year the aggregate worldwide market value of its common equity held by non-affiliates will be US$700,000 or more.
 
For so long as the Company remains an emerging growth company, it is permitted to and intends to rely upon exemptions from certain disclosure requirements that are applicable to other public companies that are not emerging growth companies. These exemptions include not being required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. The Company cannot predict whether investors will find the Common Shares less attractive because the Company relies upon certain of these exemptions. If some investors find the Common Shares less attractive as a result, there may be a less active trading market for the Common Shares and the Common Share price may be more volatile. On the other hand, if the Company no longer qualifies as an emerging growth company, the Company would be required to divert additional management time and attention from the Company’s development and other business activities and incur increased legal and financial costs to comply with the additional associated reporting requirements, which could negatively impact the Company’s business, financial condition and results of operations.

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The Group operates in multiple jurisdictions and is subject to currency fluctuations
 
The Group currently has assets and operations in Israel and Germany and transacts business in such jurisdictions and in additional jurisdictions such as Canada in the local currency. As of December 31, 2023, a portion of the Group’s financial assets and liabilities held in NIS, Euros, Canadian and U.S. dollars consist of cash and cash equivalents. The Group’s objective in managing its foreign currency risk is to minimize its net exposure to foreign currency cash flows by transacting, to the greatest extent possible, with third parties as applicable. The Group's objective in managing its foreign currency risk is to minimize its net exposure to foreign currency cash flows by transacting, to the greatest extent possible, with third parties in NIS. The Group does not currently use foreign exchange contracts to hedge its exposure of its foreign currency cash flows as management has determined that this risk is not significant at this point of time. Currency fluctuations could have a material adverse effect on the Group’s business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
The Company’s shareholding in other entities is subject to price fluctuations
 
The Company’s investments in unlisted shares are sensitive to the market price risk arising from uncertainties about the future value of these investments. The Company manages the price risk through diversification and tight management attention. The Board reviews and approves all decisions related to investments in shares.
 
Judicial and legislative reforms in Israel
 
Israel is and has been undergoing political and social instability relating to the judicial and legislative reforms proposed by the newly elected government, creating certain instability and uncertainty. This instability, which has a certain effect on the activity of the financial markets, may cause material impact on the Groups’ ability to operate in the Israeli market, which derives, among other, from: exposure to currency exchange rate and interest rate, reduced sales due to disruptive days and lower probability for capital investments.

CCAA Proceedings
 
For more information of the Company’s Companies’ Creditors Arrangement Act (“CCAA”) proceedings, please see the section entitled “Canadian Restructuring”.

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ITEM 4.          INFORMATION ON THE COMPANY
 
A.          History and Development of the Company
 
Name, Address and Incorporation
 
The Company was incorporated on March 7, 1980 under the name “Nirvana Oil & Gas Ltd.” pursuant to the Business Corporations Act (British Columbia) (the “BCBCA”).  Since 2019, the Company is acting in the medical cannabis industry.
 
The Common Shares trade under the ticker symbol “IMCC” on both the Nasdaq and CSE effective March 1, 2021 and November 5, 2019, respectively, and certain warrants of the Company are listed and posted for trading on the CSE under the symbol “IMCC.WT”.
 
On June 22, 2018, the Company completed a consolidation of its Common Shares on a 5:1 basis.
 
On October 4, 2019, in connection with the reverse take over transaction by IMC Holdings, the Company completed a consolidation of its Common Shares on a 2.83:1 basis, changed its name to “IM Cannabis Corp.” and changed its business from mining to the international medical cannabis industry.
 
On February 12, 2021, in connection with its Nasdaq listing application, the Company completed a consolidation of its Common Shares on a 4:1 basis.
 
On November 17, 2022, in connection with regaining compliance with Nasdaq’s continued listing standards, the Company competed a 10:1 consolidation of its Common Shares, which was approved by shareholders at the Company’s annual and special meeting of shareholders held on October 20, 2022.

The Company’s head office is located at Kibbutz Glil Yam, Israel and its registered office is located at 833 Seymour Street, Suite 3606, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6B 0G4, Canada. The company does not have a telephone number associated with its registered office.
 
The SEC maintains an internet site at http://www.sec.gov that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC. Our internet site is https://www.imcannabis.com.
 
Events in the Development of the Business
 
DEVELOPMENTS DURING THE FINANCIAL YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2023
 
WAGNERS™ Brand Update

On January 19, 2022, Focus imported premium indoor-grown Canadian cannabis flowers from Trichome JWC Acquisition Corp. (“TJAC”), and an additional supply partner. The Group commenced the sale of imported cannabis flowers under its WAGNERS™ brand in the Israeli medical cannabis market as of February 2022. In Q3 of 2023, The WAGNERS™ brand relaunched “Cherry Jam”, “Pink Bubba”, “Golden Ghost”, “Tiki Rain”, “Rain”, “Forest Crunch” and “Silverback”. For more information, please see the section entitled “Israeli Medical Cannabis Business”.
 
Revolving Credit Facility Agreement with an Israeli Bank - Bank Mizrahi

In January 2022, Focus entered into a revolving credit facility with an Israeli bank, Bank Mizrahi (the “Mizrahi Facility”). The Mizrahi Facility is guaranteed by Focus assets. Advances from the Mizrahi Facility will be used for working capital needs. The Mizrahi Facility has a total commitment of up to NIS 15,000 (approximately $6,000) and has a one-year term for on-going needs and 6 months term for imports and purchases needs. The Mizrahi Facility is renewable upon mutual agreement by the parties. The borrowing base available for draw at any time throughout the Mizrahi Facility and is subject to several covenants to be measured on a quarterly basis (the “Mizrahi Facility Covenants”). The Mizrahi Facility bears interest at the Israeli Prime interest rate plus 1.5%.  During the first quarter of 2023, the Company reduced total commitments to NIS 10,000 (approximately, C$3,600) and as of December 31, 2023, Focus has drawn down $3,227 in respect of the Mizrahi Facility as at December 31, 2023.

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On May 17, 2023, the Company and the Mizrahi Facility entered into a subsequent revolving credit facility arrangement with a total commitment of up to NIS 10,000 (approximately C$3,600) (the “New Mizrahi Facility”). The New Mizrahi Facility consists of a (i) NIS 5,000 credit line; and (iii) a NIS 5,000 loan to be settled with 24 monthly installments that commenced on May 17, 2023. The loan portion of the New Mizrahi Facility bears interest at the Israeli Prime interest rate plus 2.9%. As of December 2023, Focus has drawn down C$3,227 in respect the New Mizrahi Facility (comprised of approximately $1,827 from (i) the credit line; and $1,500 from the loan portion). The New Mizrahi Facility is also subject to several covenants to be measured on a quarterly basis which were not met as of December 31, 2023; therefore, the loan is classified as short-term loan.

The Company’s Chief Executive Officer and director, provided the Mizrahi Facility a personally guarantee in the amount of the outstanding borrowed amount, allowing the New Mizrahi Facility to remain effective.

Panaxia Transaction Update

On February 13, 2023, the Company provided an update on its previously announced transaction with Panaxia Pharmaceutical Industries Israel Ltd., and Panaxia Logistics Ltd., part of the Panaxia Labs Israel Ltd. group of companies (collectively, “Panaxia”). Under the transaction terms, the Company purchased the home-delivery services and an online retail footprint operating under the name “Panaxia-to-the-Home” is Israel, which includes a customer service center, an Israeli medical cannabis distribution with IMC-GDP license, and an online related business together with associated intellectual property (the “Panaxia Transaction”). The consideration payable by the Company under the Panaxia Transaction was NIS 18,700 (approximately $7,200), comprised of $2,900 in cash, payable in two installments, and $4,300 in Common Shares, payable in five installments. To date, the Company preformed four installments as was previously announced on August 9, 2021, September 8, 2021, October 20, 2021, and November 18, 2021, respectively. The Panaxia Transaction included a further option to acquire, for no additional consideration, a pharmacy, including requisite license to dispense and sell medical cannabis to patents (“Panaxia Pharmacy Option”).
 
The Company and Panaxia reached an agreement to terminate the Panaxia Pharmacy Option on February 13, 2023. In consideration for termination of the Panaxia Pharmacy Option, the Company will not be required to make the fifth installment of $2,619 worth of Common Shares owed by the Company to Panaxia under the Panaxia Transaction and was supposed to receive an agreed compensation amount of $9,464 from Panaxia to be paid by Panaxia in services and cannabis inflorescence in accordance with the terms as agreed by the parties.
 
Acquisition of Jerusalem’s Leading Medical Cannabis Pharmacy – Oranim Pharm Update
 
On March 28, 2022, pursuant to an agreement entered into on December 1, 2021, IMC Holdings completed the acquisition of 51.3% of the outstanding ordinary shares of Oranim Plus, who holds 99.5% of the rights in the partnership (the “Oranim Pharm Partnership”), resulting in IMC Holdings owning 51% of the rights in “Oranim Pharm”, which is one of the largest pharmacies selling medical cannabis in Israel and the largest pharmacy selling medical cannabis in the Jerusalem area (the “Oranim Transaction”). The Oranim Transaction closed upon receipt of all requisite approvals, including the approval of the IMCA. The Oranim Transaction was completed for total consideration of NIS 11,940 (approximately $4,600), comprised of NIS 10,404 (approximately $4,000) and NIS 1,536 (approximately $600) in Common Shares issued on closing. In satisfaction of the cash consideration component, NIS 5,202 (approximately $2,000) paid at signing of the definitive agreement and NIS 5,363 were supposed to be paid in several installments throughout 2023 and until February 15, 2024. Through a new amendment signed January 10, 2024, the sixth (6) payment as well as the reconciliation between the parties regarding all remaining unpaid installments has been postponed to April 15, 2024. All six installments (that remain unpaid) will incur a 15% interest charge. Failure to meet the remaining payments will result in the transfer of IMC Holdings shares (51%) back to the seller, along with the revocation of the transaction.
 
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Based on the Group’s working capital position as of December 31, 2023, management considers the risk of not being able to pay all six installments, potentially resulting in the revocation of the transaction, to be high.
 
In satisfaction of the share consideration component, the Company issued 251,001 Common Shares at a deemed issue price of US$1.90 per share (approximately $2.37), calculated based on the average closing price of the Common Shares on the Nasdaq for the 14-trading day period immediately preceding March 28, 2022. The Common Shares issued were subject to a staggered three-month lockup commencing on the date of issuance.
 
Closure of the Focus Facility
 
On April 6, 2022, the Company announced new strategic imperatives designed to enhance organizational efficiency and reduce operating costs while further responding to the increased demand for premium, indoor-grown Canadian cannabis from Israeli consumers. As part of these changes, in Q2 2022, the Company closed its cultivation facility in Sde Avraham, Israel (the “Focus Facility”) to concentrate on leveraging its skilled sourcing team and strategic alliances with Canadian suppliers. In July 2022, Focus received an IMCA license which allows it to continue to import cannabis products and supply medical cannabis to patients through licensed pharmacies despite the closure of the Focus Facility. To supplement growing demand, the Company plans to continue its relationships with third-party cultivation facilities in Israel for the propagation and cultivation of the Company’s existing proprietary genetics and for the development of new products.
 
Debt Settlement with L5 Capital Inc.
 
On May 8, 2023, the Company closed a debt settlement transaction (the “Debt Settlement”) with L5 Capital Inc., a company controlled by Marc Lustig, executive chairman and a director of the Company (“L5 Capital”). Pursuant to the Debt Settlement, the Company settled outstanding indebtedness of $839 (approximately US$616) through issuing 492,492 units at a price of US$1.25 per unit. Each unit consisted of one Common Share and one Common Share purchase warrant. Each warrant entitles L5 Capital to purchase one additional Common Share at an exercise price of US$1.50 per Common Share for a period of 36 months from the date of issuance.
 
NASDAQ Compliance Notice
 
To maintain the listing of the Common Shares on the Nasdaq, the Company must comply with Nasdaq’s continued listing requirements which require, amongst other things, that the Common Shares maintain a minimum bid price of at least US$1.00 per share (the “Minimum Share Price Listing Requirement”).
 
On August 1, 2023, the Company received written notification from Nasdaq (the “Notification Letter”) that the closing bid price of the Common Shares had fallen below US$1.00 per share over a period of 30 consecutive business days, with the result that the Company was not in compliance with the Minimum Share Price Listing Requirement. The Notification Letter provided that the Company had until January 29, 2024, being 180 calendar days following receipt of such notice to regain compliance with the Minimum Share Price Listing Requirement. On January 31, 2024, the Company received an extension a 180-calendar day extension, until July 29, 2024, from Nasdaq staff to regain compliance with the Minimum Share Price Listing Requirements.
 
Canadian Restructuring
 
On August 5, 2022, the Company commenced a restructuring plan in Canada through which it is taking a disciplined approach to spending and implementing cost efficiencies (the “Canadian Restructuring”). The Company entered into an agreement to sell all of the issued and outstanding shares of SublimeCulture Inc. (“Sublime”), a wholly owned subsidiary TJAC, on an “as is, where is” basis to a group of purchasers that included current and former members of the Sublime management team for aggregate proceeds of approximately $100 less working capital adjustments, for a final net purchase price of $89 (the “Sublime Transaction”). The Sublime Transaction included the sale of Sublime’s lease obligation of the approximately 930 square metre cultivation and storage facility and Sublime’s related operations. The Canadian Restructuring also included halting cultivation at the facility operated by Highland in Antigonish, Nova Scotia.

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On November 7, 2022, in connection with the Company’s efforts to achieve operational efficiencies, the Company announced that it is pivoting its focus and resources on growth in its highest value markets in Israel and Germany while also commencing its exit from the Canadian cannabis market as part of the Canadian Restructuring. With this move, the Company aimed for a leaner organization with a primary focus on achieving profitability in 2023.

The Canadian operations were held through Trichome and being orderly wound-down under CCAA pursuant to an initial order of the Ontario Superior Court of Justice (Commercial List) (the “Court”) issued on November 7, 2022 (as amended and restated by an order made by the Court on November 17, 2022, the “Initial Order”). The Initial Order includes a broad stay (as extended from time to time, the “Stay”) of all proceedings against Trichome and its assets. Pursuant to the Initial Order, KSV Restructuring Inc. was appointed as monitor (the “Monitor”) in the CCAA Proceedings.

In connection with the CCAA Proceedings, TJAC, as borrower (the “Borrower”), the remaining members of Trichome, as guarantors and Cortland Credit Lending Corporation, as agent for and on behalf of itself and certain lenders (the “DIP Lender”), entered into a debtor-in-possession facility agreement dated November 6, 2022 (as amended, the “DIP Agreement”). Pursuant to the DIP Agreement, the DIP Lender has agreed to provide a super-priority interim revolving credit facility (subject to certain mandatory repayment provisions) to the Borrower (the “DIP Facility”). In accordance with the DIP Agreement, the DIP Facility is to be used during the CCAA Proceedings by the Borrower to fund its working capital needs. The DIP Facility is subject to customary covenants, conditions precedent, and representations and warranties made by Trichome to the DIP Lender. The current DIP Lender’s charge approved by the Court is up to the maximum amount of $4,875.

On January 9, 2023, the Court issued an order in the CCAA Proceedings in respect of a motion brought by Trichome to approve, among other things: a sale and investment solicitation process (the “SISP”) in respect of the business and assets of Trichome; and a stalking horse share purchase agreement (the “Stalking Horse Purchase Agreement”) between Trichome and L5 Capital dated December 12, 2022. The SISP established a process to solicit interest for investments in, or the sale of any or all of the, Trichome’s business and assets.

On February 22, 2023, the Monitor issued a report (the “Monitor’s Third Report”) in the CCAA Proceedings advising, among other things, that (i) no qualified bids were received pursuant to the SISP, (ii) L5 Capital informed Trichome that it would not be completing the transaction contemplated by the Stalking Horse Purchase Agreement and, as a result, Trichome terminated the Stalking Horse Purchase Agreement, and (iii) the Monitor continues to market for sale Trichome’s business and assets, including the brands and other intellectual property owned by Trichome.

The Monitor’s Third Report also reported on the financial situation of Trichome advising that due to Trichome’s financial performance and the termination of the Stalking Horse Purchase Agreement, the DIP Lender informed Trichome that the DIP Lender would only fund expenses required for a wind-down of Trichome’s business and as such, Trichome will not have the ability to pay unpaid payables that are not required to be paid in connection with the wind-down. Trichome has advised that it will not purchase additional goods or services without the prior consent of the Monitor.

On March 9, 2023, the Court issued an order extending the Stay until April 21, 2023 in order to allow Trichome to complete the orderly wound-down of its operations.

Pursuant to an order of the Court made on April 6, 2023 in the CCAA Proceedings (the “Reverse Vesting Order”), the Court approved a share purchase agreement (the “Share Purchase Agreement”) dated March 28, 2023 among Trichome, 1000370759 Ontario Inc. (the “Purchaser”), TJAC, Trichome Retail Corp. (“TRC”), MYM Nutraceuticals Inc. (“MYM”), MYM International Brands Inc. (“MYMB”) and Highland Grow Inc. (“Highland”, and collectively with TJAC, TRC, MYM and MYMB, the “Purchased Entities”). The Purchased Entities and its business and operations were sold to a party that is not related to the Company. Thus, the Company has exited operations in Canada and considers these operations discontinued. The Share Purchase Agreement is solely in respect of the Purchased Entities. As such, the Company’s other assets or subsidiaries, including those in Israel and Germany, will not be affected by it.

The Share Purchase Agreement contemplated a reverse vesting transaction pursuant to which Trichome agreed to sell to the Purchaser, and the Purchaser agreed to purchase, all of the issued and outstanding shares in the capital of TJAC and MYM owned by Trichome for a purchase price of $3,375 along with certain deferred consideration. Pursuant to the Share Purchase Agreement and Reverse Vesting Order, the Purchased Entities retained the Purchased Entities’ assets, contracts and liabilities (the “Assumed Liabilities”) specified in the Share Purchase Agreement free and clear of any claims other than the Assumed Liabilities, and all other assets, contracts, and liabilities of the Purchased Assets were transferred to, and assumed by, five newly created corporations being 1000491916 Ontario Inc. ("TJAC Residual Co."), 1000492008 Ontario Inc. ("TRC Residual Co."), 1000491929 Ontario Inc. ("MYM Residual Co."), 1000492005 Ontario Inc. ("MYMB Residual Co.") and 1000492023 Ontario Inc. ("Highland Residual Co.", and collectively with TJAC Residual Co., TRC Residual Co., MYM Residual Co. and MYMB Residual Co., the “Residual Corporations”), the shares of which are owned directly or indirectly by Trichome. The closing of the transactions contemplated by the Share Purchase Agreement occurred on April 6, 2023.

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On September 14, 2023, a CCAA termination order was granted upon service on the service list of an executed certificate and the above CCAA Proceedings under the CCAA and Stay was terminated without any further act or formality.

On September 29, 2023, Trichome filed (or was deemed to have filed) an assignment (or bankruptcy order was made against Trichome, and Goldhar & Associates Ltd., was appointed as trustee of the estate of the bankrupt by the official receiver (or the Court). The first meeting of the creditors was held on October 17, 2023.

In the context of the deconsolidation of the Canadian operations, there are no remaining liabilities to the Company or any of its consolidated subsidiaries related to the Canadian entities, except tax obligations of $839 related to a debt settlement with L5 Capital. The CCAA Proceedings were solely in respect of Trichome. As such, the Company’s other assets or subsidiaries, including those in Israel and Germany, were not parties to the CCAA Proceedings. Court materials filed in connection with Trichome’s CCAA Proceedings can be found at: https://www.ksvadvisory.com/insolvency-cases/case/trichome.

Life Offering
 
In January and February of 2023, the Company issued an aggregate of 2,828,248 units of the Company (each a “Life Unit”) at a price of US$1.25 per Life Unit for aggregate gross proceeds of US$3,535 in a series of closings pursuant to a non-brokered private placement offering to purchasers resident in Canada (except the Province of Quebec) and/or other qualifying jurisdictions relying on the listed issuer financing exempt under Part 5A of National Instrument 45-106 – Prospectus Exemptions (the “LIFE Offering”). Each Life Unit consisted of one Common Share and one Common Share purchase warrant (each a “Life Warrant”), with each Life Warrant entitling the holder thereof to purchase one additional Common Share at an exercise price of US$1.50 for a period of 36 months from the date of issue.
 
In addition, a non-independent director of the Company subscribed for an aggregate of 131,700 Life Units under the LIFE Offering at an aggregate subscription price of US$165. The director’s subscription price was satisfied by the settlement of US$165 in debt owed by the Company to the director certain consulting services previously rendered by the director to the Company.
 
In connection with the LIFE Offering, the Company and Odyssey Trust Company entered into a series of warrant indentures on January 30, 2023 (the “First LIFE Warrant Indenture”), February 7, 2023 (the “Second LIFE Warrant Indenture”) and February 16, 2024 (the “Third LIFE Warrant Indenture”) to govern the terms and conditions of the Life Warrants.
 
Concurrent Offering
 
Concurrent with the LIFE Offering, the Company issued an aggregate of 2,317,171 units on a non-brokered private placement basis at a price of US$1.25 per unit for aggregate gross proceeds of US$2,897 (the “Concurrent Offering”). The Concurrent Offering was led by insiders of the Company. The units offered under the Concurrent Offering were sold under similar terms as the Life Offering and were offered for sale to purchasers in all provinces and territories of Canada and jurisdictions outside Canada pursuant to available prospectus exemptions other than for the LIFE Offering exemption. All units issued under the Concurrent Offering were subject to a statutory hold period of four months and one day in accordance with applicable Canadian securities laws.

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Board Changes
 
On March 8, 2023, the Company announced its strategic plan to reorganize the Company’s management and operations to strengthen its focus on core activities (the “Restructuring Plan”). As part of the Restructuring Plan, the following positions in the Company’s global leadership team transitioned to highly skilled internal successors:
 

Shai Shemesh, resigned as Chief Financial Officer of the Company and Itay Vago, was appointed as Chief Financial Officer of the Company to fill the vacancy created by Shai Shemesh’s resignation.
 

Rinat Efrima, resigned as Chief Executive Officer of IMC Holdings and Eyal Fisher was appointed as the General Manager of IMC Holdings to fill the vacancy created by Ms. Efrima’s resignation. Mr. Fisher previously held the position of Sales Director of IMC Holdings prior to his appointment as General Manager.
 

Yael Harrosh resigned as Chief Legal and Operations Officer of the Company and Michal Lebovitz was appointed as General Counsel of the Company to fill the vacancy created by Mr. Harrosh’s resignation.
 
On September 19, 2023, the Company announced the resignation of Itay Vago, the Company’s Chief Financial Officer.
 
On October 10, 2023, the Company announced that Uri Birenberg was appointed as Chief Financial Officer to fill the vacancy created by Mr. Vago’s resignation.
 
Loan from ADI
 
On October 11, 2022, IMC Holdings entered into a loan agreement (the “ADI Agreement”) with A.D.I. Car Alarms Stereo Systems Ltd (“ADI”), to borrow a principal amount of NIS 10,500 (approximately $4,045) at an annual interest of 15% (the “ADI Loan”), which is to be repaid within 12 months of the date of the ADI Agreement. The ADI Loan is secured by a second rank land charge on the Logistic Center of Adjupharm. In addition, the Company’s Chief Executive Officer and director of the Company, provided a personal guarantee to ADI should the security not be sufficient to cover the repayment of the ADI Loan.
 
On October 25, 2023, IMC Holdings and ADI signed an amendment to the ADI Agreement, extending the loan period by an additional 3 months. During this extended period, the interest rate will be 15%, with associated fees and commissions of 3% per annum for application fee and an origination fee of 3% per annum.
 
On February 26, 2024, IMC Holdings and ADI signed an additional amendment to the ADI Agreement, extending the loan period until April 15, 2024, with the same terms as the first amendment, as specified above.
 
Launch of BLKMKT™ Brand in Israeli Medical Cannabis Market
 
On October 12, 2022, the Company and Avant Brands Inc. (“Avant”) announced the signing of an international trademark licensing agreement (the “Licensing Agreement”) granting the Company the exclusive right to launch the BLKMKT™ brand in the Israeli medical cannabis market. Under the terms of the Licensing Agreement, a subsidiary of Avant will license the Company’s premium- cannabis flagship BLKMKT™ brand to an Israeli subsidiary of the Company for use on the Company’s medical cannabis product packaging. All such packaging will contain cannabis cultivated exclusively by Avant and sold to the Company’s affiliates. The integration of unique and exclusive varieties of the high-quality BLKMKT™ brand into the Company’s current premium product portfolio will serve to bolster the cooperative and synergistic partnership forged between the Avant and the Company over the past two years. The Licensing Agreement signals the Company’s commitment to implementing a premium strategy and acts as another step to establish the Company’s leadership of the ultra-premium segment in Israel.
 
In Q4 2023, the Company relaunched two additional products under the BLKMKT™ brand, which included “JEALOUSY” and “BACIO GLTO”. For more information, please see the section entitled “B. Business Overview”.

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35 Oak Holdings Ltd – Statement of Complaint
 
On November 17, 2023, the Company received a copy of a Statement of Claim that was filed in the Ontario Superior Court of Justice in Canada by 35 Oak Holdings Ltd., MW Investments Ltd., 35 Oak Street Developments Ltd., Michael Wiener, Kevin Weiner, William Weiner, Lily Ann Goldstein-Weiner, in their capacity as trustees of the Weiner Family Foundation (collectively the "MYM Shareholder Plaintiffs") against the Company and its board of directors, Board and officers, (collectively, the "MYM Defendants").
 
MYM Shareholder Plaintiffs claims that the MYM Defendants made misrepresentations in its disclosures prior to the Company's transaction with MYM in 2021. The MYM Shareholder Plaintiffs are claiming damages that amount to approximately $15,000 and aggravated, exemplary and punitive damages in the amount of $1,000.
 
The Company has reviewed the complaint and believes that the allegations are without merit.
 
The Company, together with some of the Defendants brought, on February 22, 2024, a preliminary motion to strike out several significant parts of the claim (the "Motion") The Motion has not been scheduled by the court.
 
At this time, the Company's management is of the view that the Motion has merit and is likely to succeed in at least narrowing the scope of the claim against the Company, and that it may also result in certain of the claims against individuals being dismissed altogether, and if not dismissed narrowed in scope and complexity.
 
The Company plans to vigorously defend itself against the allegations. At this stage, the Company management cannot assess the chances of the claim advancing or the potential outcome of this these proceedings.
 
Annual General and Special Meeting
 
On December 6, 2023, the Company held an annual and special meeting where shareholders approved fixing the number of directors of the Company at five, elected the directors for the ensuing year and re-appointment of Kost Forer Gabbay & Kasierer, a member of Ernst & Young Global, Tel Aviv, Israel (PCAOB ID 1281) (“Kost Forer”) as auditor of the Company.
 
Loan to Telecana
 
On November 29, 2022, the Company’s subsidiary, IMC Holdings entered into a convertible loan agreement (the “Telecana Loan Agreement”) with Telecana Ltd. (“Telecana”) and the sole shareholder of Telecana, whereby IMC Holdings loaned NIS 1,545 (approximately $605) to Telecana according to the following advance schedule: NIS 45 on January 15, 2023 (approximately C$18); NIS 250 on January 31, 2023 (approximately C$98); NIS$500 (approximately C$196) on February 28, 2023; NIS 500 (approximately C$196) on April 5, 2023; and NIS 250 (approximately C$98) on May 5, 2023. Telecana opened a pharmacy and obtained from the IMCA a license to dispense medical cannabis products. Pursuant to the Telecana Loan Agreement, subject to IMCA approval, the loan can be converted into 51% of the share capital of Telecana, with such conversion to occur at the earlier: (i) upon receipt of a preliminary license from the IMCA; and (ii) at any time at the sole discretion of IMC Holdings. As of the date of this Annual Report, notwithstanding that Telecana has received such preliminary license, the parties are in the process of obtaining IMCA approval to complete the conversion.
 
Medical Cannabis Reform
 
On December 8, 2023. the Company announced a 3-month delay of the anticipated medical cannabis reform announced by the Israeli ministry of health on August 7, 2023. Due to the Israel-Hamas war, the anticipated implementation of the medical cannabis regulatory reform, originally scheduled for December 29, 2023, was postponed by three months. The new regulations were designed to alleviate many of the stringent restrictions in the sector, thereby enhancing access to medical cannabis for patients. In addition to the regulatory reform, the Medical Cannabis Unit of the Ministry of Health released a new report that shows, among other statistics, data on the number of patients obtaining medical cannabis licenses. There was a notable surge in the number of new medical cannabis patients in November 2023, with 3,254 new patients receiving licenses, the largest increase in new patients per month since 2021.

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Planning and Construction Legal Proceedings
 
On December 28, 2023, a settlement was reached in the Planning and Construction Legal Proceedings against Focus. As previously disclosed in the Company’s annual information form dated April 26, 2021, and the press release dated July 13, 2021, as well as in the Company’s financial statements and management’s discussion and analysis for the year ended December 31, 2022, certain allegations were made against Focus regarding inadequate permitting for construction at its cultivation facility. The settlement involved Focus, Oren Shuster, Refael Gabay, Yaron Berger, the former Chief Executive Officer of Focus, along with the three landowners on whose property Focus operated the cultivation facility. The settlement resulted in the dismissal of all criminal charges against the individual defendants, with only Focus being charged. Focus received a monetary fine of approximately C$129 (NIS 350), payable in 10 installments. After a long legal process since the indictment, Focus has destroyed all the buildings that didn’t have the construction permits, closed the cultivation facility in Sdei Avraham in June 2022, ceased with its cultivation operation and now focusing on import and sales operations. Currently, the Company's management do not anticipate a material impact on the licensing or normal course of operations for Focus due to the indictment and the settlement that has been achieved.

EVENTS FOLLOWING THE FINANCIAL YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2023
 
Acquisition of Jerusalem’s Leading Medical Cannabis Pharmacy – Oranim Pharm Update
 
On January 12, 2024, the Company announced that the final sixth payment of the Oranim Pharmacy Acquisition and the reconciliation between the parties regarding the remaining transaction payments are being rescheduled to April 15, 2024.
 
Through the transaction, completed on March 28, 2022, IMC Holdings Ltd. acquired 51% of the rights in Oranim Pharm Partnership through the acquisition of Oranim Plus. As part of the transaction consideration, NIS 5,363K or 1,930K CAD were supposed to be paid in six installments throughout 2023, with the final payment due February 15, 2024.
 
Through a new amendment signed January 10, 2024, the sixth (6) payment as well as the reconciliation between the parties regarding all remaining unpaid installments has been postponed to April 15, 2024. All six installments (that remain unpaid) will incur a 15% interest charge. Failure to meet the remaining payments will result in the transfer of IMC Holdings Ltd. shares (51%) back to the seller, along with the revocation of the transaction.
 
NASDAQ Compliance Notice Update
 
On January 31, 2024, the Company received an extension a 180-calendar day extension, until July 29, 2024, from Nasdaq staff to regain compliance with the Minimum Share Price Listing Requirements (the “Extension”). As at the date of this Annual Report, the Company continues to monitor the closing bid price of its Common Shares and plans to pursue available options to regain compliance with the Minimum Share Price Listing Requirement, including potentially pursuing a reverse stock split. If the Company authorizes a reverse stock split, it will plan to effectuate the split no later than ten business days prior to the end of the Extension.
 
Potential Reverse Merger with Kadimastem
 
On February 28, 2024, the Company announced that it had entered into a non-binding term sheet dated February 13, 2024, as amended (the “Kadimastem Term Sheet”), and the Loan Agreement (as defined below), with IMC Holdings, with Israel-based Kadimastem Ltd., a clinical cell therapy public company traded on the Tel Aviv stock exchange under the symbol (TASE: KDST) (“Kadimastem”), whereby the parties will complete a business combination that will constitute a reverse merger into the Company by Kadimastem (the “Proposed Transaction”).

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The Proposed Transaction is expected to be completed by way of a plan of arrangement, involving a newly created wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company and Kadimastem (the “Arrangement”). The resulting issuer that will exist upon completion of the Proposed Transaction (the “Resulting Issuer”) will change its business from medical cannabis to biotechnology and, at the closing of the Proposed Transactions (the "Closing"), Kadimastem shareholders will hold 88% of the common shares of the Resulting Issuer (the “Resulting Issuer Shares”) and the shareholders of the Company will hold 12% of the Resulting Issuer Share. The parties may agree, in the definitive agreement, on a different structure of equity in lieu of the warrants (as described below) with a similar result. The Proposed Transaction is an arm’s length transaction.
 
Prior to Closing, the Company’ss existing medical cannabis operation and other current activities in Israel and Germany (the "Legacy Business") will be restructured (the “Spin-Out”) as a contingent value right (the "CVR"). The CVR will entitle the holders thereof to receive net cash, equity, or other net value upon the sale of the Legacy Business following the Closing, subject to the terms of the Loan Agreement.
 
To facilitate the sale of the Legacy Business, a special committee of the Board was formed, which will oversee the potential sale in collaboration with legal and financial advisors.
 
The Legacy Business will be made available for potential sale to a third party for a period of up to 12 months from Closing (the "Record Date"). After the Record Date, any remaining Legacy Business in the CVR will be offered for sale through a tender process, subject to the terms of the best offer. The proceeds from the sale of the Legacy Business will be utilized to settle debts and distribute the remaining balance, if any, to CVR holders.
 
As a condition of Closing, Kadimastem will have approximately US$5,000 in gross funds, at Closing including capital raised concurrently with the completion of the Proposed Transaction from existing shareholders and additional investors.

In addition to the foregoing, subject to compliance with applicable law, the Company shall grant shareholders of the Company as of Closing, with warrant(s) equal their pro rata portion, of 2% of the Resulting Issuer’s issued and outstanding common share capital (the "IMC Shares") prior to the Closing Date (in the aggregate), with an exercise price per share equal to the 10 day volume-weighted average price of the Resulting Issuer’s shares calculated on the Nasdaq, ending 2 trading days prior to Closing, the warrants will be for a period of 24 months following Closing.

In accordance with the terms of the Proposed Transaction, the holders of the issued and outstanding shares in the capital of Kadimastem (the “Kadimastem Shares”) will be issued such number of IMC Shares in exchange for every one Kadimastem Share held immediately prior to the completion of the Proposed Transaction that reflects the ratio outlined above (the “Exchange Ratio”). Outstanding convertible securities of Kadimastem (the “Kadimastem Convertible Securities”) will be treated through customary mechanics as shall be determined in the definitive agreement, which may include, the assumption of the Kadimastem Convertible Securities by the Company subject to customary adjustments to reflect the Exchange Ratio and exercise price.
 
Pursuant to the terms of the Kadimastem Term Sheet, a loan agreement dated February 28, 2024 (the "Loan Agreement") was entered between IMC Holdings and Kadimastem. Pursuant to the Loan Agreement, Kadimastem will provide a loan of up to US$650 to the IMC Holdings, funded in two installments: US$300 upon signing the Loan Agreement and US$350 upon the execution of the definitive agreement regarding the Proposed Transaction (the "Kadimastem Loan").
 
The Kadimastem Loan accrues interest at a rate of 9.00% per annum, compounding annually and is secured by the following collaterals and guarantees: (a) 10% of the proceeds derived from any operation sale under the CVR (“Charged Rights”), limited to the outstanding Loan Amount and expenses according to the Loan Agreement, accordingly IMC Holdings may, at its sole discretion, to record a second-ranked fixed charge  over the Charged Rights or, alternatively, in case the existing pledges over the Charged Rights at the date of signing the Loan Agreement are subsequently discharged or removed, then the Borrower shall promptly record a first-ranking fixed charge over the Charged Assets with all applicable public records; provided that IMC Holdings shall not impose any new lien, mortgage, charge or pledge over the Charged Rights that did not exist on the date hereof, or any other liens, subject to customary exclusions; (b) IMC Holdings shall use its best efforts to record a first-ranking fixed charge over the assets of its subsidiary, A.R Yarok Pharm Ltd, in due course when applicable and as deemed appropriate; and (c) a personal guarantee by Mr. Oren Shuster, the Company’s Chief Executive Officer.

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Prior to the completion of the Proposed Transaction, the Company will call a meeting of its shareholders for the purpose of approving, among other matters:


approve the Proposed Transaction;
 

approve the Spin-Out;
 

a change of name of the Company as directed by Kadimastem and acceptable to the applicable regulatory authorities effective upon Closing; and
 

reconstitution of the Board.
 
Upon closing of the Proposed Transaction, all of IMC’s current directors and executive officers will resign and the board of directors of the Resulting Issuer will, subject to the approval of governing regulatory bodies, consist of nominees of Kadimastem. All of the executive officers shall be replaced by nominees of Kadimastem, all in a manner that complies with the requirements of governing regulatory bodies and applicable securities and corporate laws.
 
Details of insiders and proposed directors and officers of the Resulting Issuer will be disclosed in a further news release.
 
The completion of the Proposed Transaction is subject to a number of conditions, including but not limited to the following:
 

the execution of a definitive agreement;
 

completion of mutually satisfactory due diligence;
 

completion of the share consolidation; and
 

receipt of all required regulatory, corporate and third party approvals, including approvals by governing regulatory bodies, the shareholders of IMC and Kadimastem, applicable Israeli governmental authorities, and the fulfilment of all applicable regulatory requirements and conditions necessary to complete the Proposed Transaction.
 
The parties are committed to seeking a successful completion of the Proposed Transaction as soon as practicable, but there can be no absolute certainty that the Proposed Transaction will take place.
 
ADI Loan Update

On February 26, 2024, IMC Holdings and ADI signed an additional amendment to the ADI Agreement, extending the loan period until April 15, 2024, with the same terms as the first amendment, as specified above.
 
Option to re-acquire the sold interest in Focus
 
On November 30, 2023, IMC Holdings exercised its option to purchase the 74% interest in Focus, held by Oren Shuster and Rafael Gabay by submitting a request to the IMCA, which approved the transaction on February 25, 2024.

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B.          Business Overview
 
IM Cannabis is an international cannabis company that is currently focused on providing premium cannabis products to medical patients in Israel and Germany, two of the world’s largest federally legal cannabis markets. Previously, the Company was also actively servicing adult-use recreational consumers in Canada, however these operations were discontinued. The Company leverages a transnational ecosystem powered by a unique data-driven approach and a globally sourced product supply chain. With an unwavering commitment to responsible growth and compliance with the strictest regulatory environments, the Company strives to amplify its commercial and brand power to become a global high-quality cannabis player.

In Israel, we continue to expand IMC brand recognition and supply the growing Israeli medical cannabis market with our branded products. The Company offers medical cannabis patients a rich variety of high-end medical cannabis products through strategic alliances with Canadian suppliers supported by a highly skilled sourcing team. In addition to the benefits of the Group’s long-term presence in Israel, we believe that with our strong sourcing infrastructure in Israel, and advanced product knowledge, regulatory expertise and strong commercial partnerships, the Company is well-positioned to address the ongoing needs and preferences of medical cannabis patients in Israel.

The Company entered additional segments of the medical cannabis value chain in Israel, namely the distribution and retail segments. The Company, through IMC Holdings, acquired three licensed pharmacies in 2022, the Israeli Pharmacies, each selling medical cannabis products to patients: (i) Oranim Plus, Israel’s largest pharmacy in Jerusalem and one of the largest in Israel, (ii) Vironna, a leading pharmacy in the Arab sector, and (iii) Pharm Yarok, the largest pharmacy in the Sharon plain area and the biggest call center in the country.

As Part of the Panaxia Transaction, the Company acquired home-delivery services and an online retail footprint, operating under the name “Panaxia-to-the-Home”, which includes a customer service center and an Israeli medical cannabis distribution licensed center.

The entrance into the new segments in Israel position the Company as a large distributor of medical cannabis in Israel. We are strategically focused on establishing and reinforcing a direct connection with medical cannabis patients, providing direct access to the Company’s products, obtaining and leveraging market data and gaining a deeper understanding of consumer preferences. The acquisition of the Israeli Pharmacies allowed the Company to increase purchasing power with third-party product suppliers, offers potential synergies with our established call center and online operations, achieves higher margins on direct sales to patient and creates the opportunity for up-sales across a growing range of products.

In Europe, the Company operates in Germany through Adjupharm, its German subsidiary and EU-GMP certified medical cannabis producer and distributor. We continue to lay our foundation in Germany. Leveraging our global supply chain, the Company continues to focus on growing its business in Germany to be well-positioned through brand recognition in preparation for future regulatory reforms.

Similar to Israel, the Company’s focus in Germany is to import dried cannabis from its supply partners, which we believe will satisfy the rapid growth in demand for high-THC cannabis across a variety of strains and qualities. In addition, Adjupharm sells cannabis extracts to meet the existing demand in the German market.

In the Company’s view, the strong sourcing infrastructure in Israel, powered by advanced product knowledge and regulatory expertise, will establish a competitive advantage in Germany ahead of proposals for the legalization of recreational cannabis. This is based on the premise that the German and Israeli markets share a number of common attributes such as robust commercial infrastructure, highly developed digital capabilities, favorable demographics and customer preferences.

While the Company does not currently distribute products in other European countries, the Company intends to leverage the foundation established by Adjupharm, its state-of-the-art EU-GMP Logistics Center, its vast knowledge in the cannabis market and costumers’ preferences and its network of distribution partners to expand into other jurisdictions across the continent.

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Adjupharm received a revised EU-GMP license in May 2022 that permits it to engage in additional production, cannabis testing and release activities. It allows Adjupharm to repackage bulk cannabis, to perform stability studies and offer such services to third parties.

In Canada, on November 7, 2022, the Company announced that it is pivoting its focus and resources to achieve sustainable and profitable growth in its highest value markets, Israel and Germany, while also commencing its exit from the Canadian cannabis market. The Canadian operations were wound-down under the CCAA under the supervision of the Court. The CCAA Proceedings afford Trichome the stability and flexibility required to orderly wind-down its business and operations.

The Group does not currently have and is not in the process of developing marijuana-related activities in the U.S., even in U.S. states where such activity has been authorized within a state regulatory framework. As such, the Company is not and would not be considered in the future a “U.S. Marijuana Issuer” within the meaning set forth in CSA Staff Notice 51-352.
 
Principal Products and Brands
 
The IMC brand has established its reputation in Israel for quality and consistency over the past 10 years and more recently with new high-end, ultra-premium strains that have made it to the top-sellers list in pharmacies across the country. The Group maintains a portfolio of strains sold under the IMC umbrella from which popular medical cannabis dried flowers and full-spectrum cannabis extracts are produced.

Israeli Medical Cannabis Business
 
The IMC brand offers four different product lines, leading with the Craft Collection which offers the highest quality Canadian craft cannabis flower and has established IMC as the leader of the super-premium segment in Israel.

The Craft Collection – The IMC brand’s super-premium product line with indoor-grown, hang-dried and hand-trimmed high-THC cannabis flowers. The Craft Collection includes exotic and unique cannabis strains such as Cherry Crasher, Peanut Butter MAC and Watermelon Zkittlez. During the year ended December 31, 2023, the Company was selling products under the Craft Collection, however, in Q4 2023, the Craft Collection was temporarily unavailable for sale by the Company and as a result, the Company did not generate any sales under the Craft Collection brand during that time. The Company has since relaunched sales under the Craft Collection.
The Top-Shelf Collection – IMC’s premium product line, which offers indoor-grown, high-THC cannabis flowers with strains such as Lemon Rocket, Diesel Drift, Tropicana Gold, Lucy Dreamz, Santa Cruz, Or’enoz, and Banjo. Inspired by the 1970’s cannabis culture in America, the Top-Shelf Collection targets the growing segment of medical patients who are cannabis culture enthusiasts.
 


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The Signature Collection – The IMC brand’s high-quality product line with greenhouse-grown or indoor grown, high-THC cannabis flowers. The Signature Collection currently includes well known cannabis dried flowers such as Roma®, Chemchew, Karmalada, Rockabye, Silver haze, all an indoor-grown flowers.


The Full Spectrum Extracts – The IMC brand’s full spectrum, strain-specific cannabis extracts, including high-THC Roma®T20 oil. As part of the recent rebranding the Company expanded its Roma® product portfolio also oils. IMC’s Roma® strain is high-THC medical cannabis flower that offers a therapeutic continuum and is known for its strength and longevity of effect.

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The WAGNERS™ brand launched in Israel in Q1 2022, with premium indoor-grown cannabis imported from Canada. The WAGNERS™ brand was the first international premium, indoor-grown brand introduced to the Israel cannabis market, at a competitive price point. The WAGNERS™ brand includes Cherry Jam re-launched in Q3 2023, Pink Bubba, Golden Ghost, Tiki Rain, Forest Crunch and Silverback #4.

BLKMKT™, the Company’s second Canadian brand, super premium product line with indoor grown, hand-dried and hand-trimmed high-THC cannabis flowers. The BLKMKT™ includes JEALOUSY, BACIO GLTO, PNPL P, PARK FIRE OG, UPSIDE DOWN C. In Q4 2023, the Company relaunched JEALOUSY and BACIO GLTO.
 


 
 
LOT420 brand launched in Israel in Q2 2023, with super-premium indoor-grown cannabis imported from Canada with high-THC. The LOT420 includes ICY C, GLTO 33, Atomic APP and as of Q3 2023 also Glto 33 and Xeno. The Company ceased selling Atomic APP.
 
 

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The PICO collection (minis) – Under the BLKMT and LOT420 brands, the Company launched in 2023 a new type of products (small flowers), a super-premium indoor-grown cannabis imported from Canada with high-THC. In Q4 2023, the Company re-launched PICO JEALOUSY #1 and PICO BACIO GLTO #4 T20i. In addition, the Company launched in Q4 2023, a new cannabis strain called Pico Upside Down #05 T20H.
 
 
German Medical Cannabis Business
 
In Germany, the company sells IMC-branded dried flower products and full spectrum extracts. The medical cannabis products are branded generically as IMC to increase the brand awareness and build brand heritage among the German healthcare professionals.

After launching the first high THC strain in 2020, the portfolio has been carefully curated to include 5 high THC flowers, 1 high CBD flower and 3 full spectrum extracts with the goal of providing German physicians and patients with a more complete portfolio.

In Q2 2022 the Company’s IMC Hindu Kush strain was the top selling T20 in the market.  Since 2023, the Company has been number one in sales per SKU within the entire German flower market.  In July 2021, the Company was recognized by the German Brand Institute with the “German Brand Award 2021,” recognizing its excellence in brand strategy, creation, communication and integrated.  The Company is the sixth largest cannabis company in Germany. The Group’s competitive advantage in Germany lies in its track record, experience and brand reputation in Israel, as well as the proprietary data supporting the potential effectiveness of medical cannabis for the treatment of a variety of conditions.

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New Product Offerings
 
Between our various geographies, the strategy for new products varies given that each market is at a different stage of development with respect to regulatory regimes, patient and customer preferences and adoption rates.
 
Israel
 
Brand Updates
 
In Q4 2023, the Company relaunched strains in Israel, namely the “BLKMKT JEALOUSY”, “BACIO GLTO BLKMKT”, “PICO JEALOUSY #1” and “PICO BACIO GLTO#4”. Additionally, a new cannabis strain called “Pico Upside Down #05 was introduced.
 
Revenue
 
The following table shows the sales figures in thousands of dollars for each category of products that accounted for 15% or more of the total consolidated revenue of the Company for the financial years ended December 31, 2023, 2022 and 2021, derived from (a) sales to entities in which the Company maintains an investment accounted for by the equity method; (b) sales to customers, other than those referred to in (a); and (c) sales or transfers to controlling shareholders.
 
Revenues from Continuing operations - By Product Type
Financial Year
Medical Cannabis Products
Adult-Use Recreational Cannabis Products
Other Products
Total
2023
$44,246
-
$4,559
$48,804
2022
$48,384
-
$5,951
$54,335
2021
$26,449
-
$7,604
$34,053

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Production, Distribution and Sales in Principal Markets
 
Israel
 
In Israel, we continue to expand IMC brand recognition and supply the growing Israeli medical cannabis market with our branded products. The Company offers medical cannabis patients a rich variety of high-end medical cannabis products through strategic alliances with Canadian suppliers supported by a highly skilled sourcing team. In addition to the benefits of the Group’s long-term presence in Israel, we believe that with our strong sourcing infrastructure in Israel, and advanced product knowledge, regulatory expertise and strong commercial partnerships, the Company is well-positioned to address the ongoing needs and preferences of medical cannabis patients in Israel.

The Company is also operating in the retail segment. The Company, through IMC Holdings, holds three licensed pharmacies, each selling medical cannabis products to patients: (i) Oranim Plus, Israel’s largest pharmacy in Jerusalem and one of the largest in Israel, (ii) Vironna, a leading pharmacy in the Arab sector, and (iii) Pharm Yarok, the largest pharmacy in the Sharon plain area and the biggest call center in the country.

The Company has also acquired home-delivery services and an online retail footprint, operating under the name “Panaxia-to-the-Home”, which includes a customer service center and an Israeli medical cannabis distribution licensed center. On June 30, 2023, IMC Pharma, the entity responsible for operating the trading house that was acquired within the Panaxia Transaction, ceased its operations at the aforementioned licensed center located in Lod, Israel. Consequently, the Company transitioned the operation that was conducted through IMC Pharma to third-party entities and to its own trading house currently being operated by Rosen High Way and there are no material obligations remained open following closure of the trading house.

The operation in the retail segment in Israel positions IM Cannabis as a large distributor of medical cannabis in Israel. We are strategically focused on establishing and reinforcing a direct connection with medical cannabis patients, providing direct access to IM Cannabis products, obtaining and leveraging market data and gaining a deeper understanding of consumer preferences. The operation of the Israeli Pharmacies allows the Company to increase purchasing power with third-party product suppliers, offers potential synergies with our established call center and online operations, achieves higher margins on direct sales to patient and creates the opportunity for up-sales across a growing range of products.

Europe
 
In Europe, the Company operates in Germany through Adjupharm, its German subsidiary and EU-GMP certified medical cannabis producer and distributor. We continue to lay our foundation in Germany. Leveraging our global supply chain, IM Cannabis continues to focus on growing its business in Germany to be well-positioned through brand recognition in preparation for future regulatory reforms.

Similar to Israel, the Company’s focus in Germany is to import premium dried cannabis from its supply partners, which we believe will satisfy the rapid growth in demand for high-THC premium cannabis across a variety of strains and qualities. In addition, Adjupharm sells cannabis extracts to meet the existing demand in the German market.


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In the Company’s view, the strong sourcing infrastructure in Israel, powered by advanced product knowledge and regulatory expertise, will establish a competitive advantage in Germany ahead of proposals for the legalization of recreational cannabis. This is based on the premise that the German and Israeli markets share a number of common attributes such as robust commercial infrastructure, highly developed digital capabilities, favorable demographics and customer preferences.

While the Company does not currently distribute products in other European countries, the Company intends to leverage the foundation established by Adjupharm, its state-of-the-art EU-GMP Logistic Center, its vast knowledge in the cannabis market and costumers’ preferences and its network of distribution partners to expand into other jurisdictions across the continent in which medical cannabis is legal.

Adjupharm received a revised EU-GMP license in May 2022 that permits it to engage in additional production, cannabis testing and release activities. It allows Adjupharm to repackage bulk cannabis, to perform stability studies and offer such services to third parties.

Competitive Conditions
 
The medical cannabis industry in which the Group operates is, and is expected to remain, very competitive. Cannabis companies compete primarily on a regional basis, and competition may vary significantly from region to region at any particular time. The cannabis sector is in a high growth phase, with market participants engaged in significant expansion across global legal jurisdictions. The Company is working to achieve a leadership position in the cannabis industry by taking advantage of IMC brand recognition, earning superior margins and leveraging its proprietary data and patient insights.
 
The Group faces competition in Israel from similar established medical cannabis brands and manufacturers in the domestic market. The Company expects that its experience and track record, attained via the combination of its operations over the past decade and IMC brand recognition, will distinguish its offerings from competitors in the Israeli market. In addition, the Company believes that with its integrated supply chain and indoor cultivation in Canada vis third parties suppliers, permitting the export of premium and super-premium cannabis products to Israel, it is uniquely positioned to address the needs of medical cannabis patients and customers.
 
The Company’s European operations will face competition from other entities licensed to cultivate, produce and distribute medical cannabis products in each respective jurisdiction. In Germany, Adjupharm will compete with a number of licensed manufacturers and distributors including currently established entities, expected new market entrants, and domestic producers of cannabis. Competitors vary from well-capitalized businesses with substantial operations and revenues to smaller or newer market entrants.
 
Intangible Properties
 
The Company relies on the licensing of its brand in Israel to widen its reach and offer branding, marketing and other related services to participants in the Israeli medical cannabis industry. The Group also plans to rely on the IMC brand to facilitate the distribution of cannabis products in international markets. The Group owns trademarks and trade secrets that allow it to serve a range of cannabis industry participants.
 
“IMC” is a registered trade name and trademark valid in Israel through May 2027, in Germany and in Portugal through the World Intellectual Property Organization through November 2027. In Canada, the Company applied for registration of the IMC name for use in connection with various food supplements, vitamins, minerals and proteins and is awaiting a response to its submissions. As of the date of this Annual Report, the pending trademark application has been examined by Canada Patent and Trademark Office. The opposition period ended on March 19, 2022 and the trademark was registered on September 26, 2022.
 
In February 2022, the Company successfully completed the registration of its well-known medical cannabis brand strain “ROMA” as a trade name in Israel and is valid through July 2031. In addition, the Company commenced trademark applications for its new branding and the name “I AM Cannabis” in Israel.
 
Government Regulations
 
To operate its business, the Company must abide by applicable medical cannabis laws in those countries in which it operates, namely Israel and Germany. Each jurisdiction has unique laws and regulations on the propagation, cultivation, production, distribution, use, import and export of medical cannabis products and the current regulatory frameworks continue to evolve. The Company cooperates with the regulatory authorities in those jurisdictions in which it operates to ensure that it is at all times in full compliance with applicable laws, rules and regulations.

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Israel
 
In Israel, cannabis is currently defined as a “dangerous drug” according to the Dangerous Drugs Ordinance (“DDO”) and the 1961 Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs (“Narcotics Convention”), to which Israel is a signatory. However, both the DDO and Narcotics Convention allow for the use of cannabis for medical or research purposes under a supervised and controlled regime. The competent regulatory authority in Israel in all matters concerning the oversight, control and regulation of cannabis for medical production, consumption, and research in Israel is the IMCA, established by Government Res. No. 3069. The production, distribution and consumption of adult-use recreational cannabis products is currently illegal in Israel.

Patient Medical Consumption
 
The use of cannabis is allowed for patients and for medical purposes, in respect of certain medical conditions, under a special approval of the MOH. Procedure 106 of the IMCA sets out a list of medical conditions that are allowed to be treated with medical cannabis products. Such authorized medical conditions are examined and updated from time to time, and include, among others, cancer, pain, nausea, seizures, muscle spasms, epilepsy, Tourette syndrome, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and post-traumatic stress disorder.
 
Licensing and Authorization for Commercial Activities in the Medical Cannabis Field
 
In December 2017, the IMCA issued regulations that standardized the licensing process for any cannabis related activity (the “Road Map”). Pursuant to the Road Map, each operation in the medical cannabis field, including the propagation, cultivation, products manufacturing, storage and distribution to licensed pharmacies, and distribution from licensed pharmacies to licensed patients, requires compliance with the provisions of applicable laws, including the procurement of an appropriate license under the DDO from the IMCA and the maintenance of such license in good standing. Cannabis licenses may not be transferred, exchanged or assigned without the prior approval of the IMCA. The licenses are valid for a period of up to 3 years and can be renewed with the approval of the IMCA only.
 
The IMCA has issued a set of directives containing procedures and requirements for applicants for cannabis related activity licenses and has authorized certain entities to issue official certificates upon compliance with such directives. These directives include (i) Directive 150 (GSP Standard certification); (ii) Directive 151 (GAP Standard certification); (iii) Directive 152 (GMP Standard certification); and (iv) Directive 153 (GDP Standard certification). Regular and periodic examinations are conducted for licensed entities, in order to ensure compliance with the analytical standards and the level of quality required during each of the phases of production and distribution of medical cannabis.
 
Medical Cannabis Imports and Exports
 
The Narcotics Convention governs the import and export of cannabis between member countries. Since Israel is a member country, any export and import of cannabis is subject to the Narcotic Convention.
 
In October 2020, the IMCA issued an updated procedure, titled “Guidelines for Approval of Applications for Importation of Dangerous Drug of Cannabis Type for Medical Use and for Research” (“Procedure 109”), describing the application requirements for cannabis import licenses for medical and research purposes. Therefore, each import of medical cannabis is to be approved by the IMCA issuing a specific import permit for each imported shipment, rather than a general license for import. An application for import of medical cannabis can be submitted by an entity licensed by the IMCA for the conduct of medical cannabis related activity. The Israeli government approved the export of pharmaceutical-grade cannabis and cannabis-based products on January 27, 2019, and in December 2020, the IMCA published guidelines for the medical cannabis export permit application process.

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Legalization of Adult-Use Recreational Cannabis and CBD for Non-Medical Purposes in Israel
 
Currently, adult-use recreational cannabis use in Israel and CBD for non-medical use is illegal. In November 2020, an Israeli government committee responsible for advancing the cannabis market reform published a report supporting and recommending the legalization of adult-use recreational cannabis in Israel. The Israeli parliament dissolved since then without applying the committee’s’ recommendations and all legislative initiatives were suspended. However, the new government, formed on June 13, 2021, declared, and settled in the coalition agreement, its commitment to legalization of adult-use recreational cannabis. Since the formation of the new government, several legislative initiatives were filed, including for the decriminalization of the possession of cannabis for individual recreational adult-use and the legalization of CBD for non-medical use. In February 2022, a Ministry of Health committee contemplated the legality of CBD and published its recommendation that CBD should be excluded from the DDO. The main recommendations of the committee were adopted by the Minister of Health, however, to date, the Minister has not enacted an order directing that CBD be removed from the DDO. On April 1, 2022, new regulations came into force which deemed the previously criminal offences of cannabis possession and use for self-consumption into administrative offences, which do not impact a criminal record, and limited the penalty to a monetary fine only.
 
Previous Regime and Price Control
 
Until September 2019, under the previous regime, patients licensed for consumption of medical cannabis products by the IMCA received all of their medical cannabis products authorized under their respective licenses at a fixed monthly price of NIS 370, regardless of each patient’s authorized amount. Since September 2019, under the new regime, licenses to patients were no longer entitling them for such fixed monthly price. However, some medical cannabis patient licenses granted under the previous regime remain valid, entitling their holders to receive medical cannabis products pursuant to the price controls and supplier restrictions of the former regime. All licenses under the previous regime expired in Q1 2022.
 
Regulatory Reform from Licenses to Prescriptions for Medical Treatment of Cannabis
 
In August 2022, the MOH published a draft outline of the transition reform from licenses to prescriptions for medical treatment of cannabis (the “Proposed Outline”). On June 13, 2023, the health committee of the Knesset approved The Dangerous Drugs Regulations (Amendment), 2023 (hereinafter referred to as the "Regulations Amendment"), which entail a model change from issuing licenses to prescriptions permits following the publication of the Proposed Outline. The Regulations Amendment allows accessibility and significant bureaucratic relief for patients. The purpose of the new prescription model is to enable qualified specialist doctors (excluding general practitioner, family physician, internal physician and pediatrician) to write prescriptions for medical cannabis for patients under the supervision of health care providers (widely known as Kupat Holim), without requiring a usage license from the Ministry of Health.
 
The main changes in the Regulations Amendment are: (i) any specialized doctor can issue permits without the need for specialized training; (ii) the permits for the use of cannabis will be in the form of prescriptions, and not in the form of licenses from the MOH as the current framework requires; (iii) cannabis products can be sold in any pharmacy, and not only in pharmacies that have received a special permit from the IMCA and a license from the MOH. The Regulations Amendment will come into effect within 180 days from the date of their publication. To the best of the Company's knowledge, the indications approved as part of the Regulations Amendment encompass various conditions, such as oncological diseases, active inflammatory bowel disease, AIDS, Multiple Sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, Tourette syndrome, epilepsy, autism, and dementia.
 
On December 8, 2023, the Company announced a 3-month delay of the anticipated medical cannabis reform announced by the Israeli ministry of health on August 7, 2023. Due to the Israel-Hamas war, the anticipated implementation of the medical cannabis regulatory reform, originally scheduled for December 29, 2023, has been postponed by three months. The new regulations were designed to alleviate many of the stringent restrictions in the sector, thereby enhancing access to medical cannabis for patients.

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“Anti-Dumping” investigation into cannabis imports from Canada
 
A notice on the Israeli Government’s website dated January 18, 2024, was addressed to 10 different Canadian cannabis producers: Village Farms International, Organigram Holdings, Tilray Canada, Hexo Corp (owned by Tilray), The Green Organic Dutchman, Canopy Growth Corporation, SNDL Inc., Cronos Group, Auxly Cannabis Group, Decibel Cannabis, and all the medical cannabis manufacturers in Canada who export their goods to Israel.
 
The Commissioner for Trade Levies at the Ministry of Economy and Industry, announced by virtue of his authority according to Section 24(d) of the Law on Trade Levies and Defence Measures, 5591 – 1991, of his decision to open an investigation on his own initiative into the export import of cannabis from Canada, after he found that special circumstances of actual damage exist or the probability of actual damage to the local manufacturing industry and a causal link between the imported imports and said damage. The notice also included a letter sent to Michael Mancini, the Chief Commercial Counselor with the Embassy of Canada, informing them of the investigation, dated January 15, 2024.The Ministry of Economy and Industry issued a formal notice to the public to respond to questionnaires regarding the "Anti-Dumping" investigation.

Further to several requests received from the parties and in accordance with section 27(b) of the Law on Trade Levies and Defense Measures, 1991 which states that "The Commissioner may, for special reasons that shall be recorded, extend the period specified in subsection (a) by an additional period that shall not exceed 30 days." (the emphasis is not in the original), the Commissioner decided that special conditions exist for extending the deadline for the submission of the required materials as part of the investigation into the export of medical cannabis to Israel from Canada for 10 days until March 10, 2024, Due to constraints presented by the parties following the "Iron Swords" war, mainly significant delays in the preparation of the materials due to the absence of many workers as part of the extensive recruitment in Israel for the reserve service at this time and due to the unique complexity of the Israeli cannabis market where many players are required to submit data both as producers and importer. The Company has submitted the relevant questionnaires regarding its subsidiaries Focus and IMC Pharma, which are included in the investigation and for its subsidiary Rosen High Way.

Germany
 
On March 10, 2017, the German federal government enacted bill Bundestag-Drucksache 18/8965 – Law amending narcotics and other regulations that amended existing narcotics legislation to recognize cannabis as a form of medicine and allow for the importation and domestic cultivation of medical cannabis products. Under the updated legislation, cannabis is listed in Annex 3 to BtMG as a “marketable narcotic suitable for prescription”. Legalization in Germany applies only to cannabis for medicinal purposes under state control in accordance with the Narcotic Convention. Currently, the production, distribution, exportation and importation of medical cannabis products in Germany is legal, subject to regulations and licensing requirements, while operations involving adult-use recreational cannabis products remain illegal. Nevertheless, current German government has declared in the coalition agreement its intention to open up the German market also in the adult-use recreational market. In October 2022, a key points paper on the controlled supply of cannabis to adults for consumption purposes, although a restructuring of the existing regulatory framework on cannabis in general is also discussed, published by the cabinet, which is to be submitted to the European Union Commission for a preliminary legal examination. In this respect, the Federal Government intends to issue a declaration of interpretation with regard to existing international agreements governing the adult-use recreational cannabis usage, and to submit a draft law to the European Union Commission within the framework of a notification. After a long political debate, the German Bundestag approved the federal government's draft law "on the controlled use of cannabis" (BT Drs. 20/8704, BT Drs. 20/8763, BT-Drs. 20/10426) on Friday, 23 February 2024. The draft passed the German Bundesrat on Friday, 22 March 2024, and will then essentially come into force on 1 April 2024 in accordance with Art. 15 of the draft. Some components of Article 1 of the draft, which deals with so-called consumer cannabis, will not come into force until later (according to Art. 15 para. 2 of the draft, for example, not until 1 July 2024). This also has direct consequences for medicinal cannabis, which is the subject matter of Art. 2 (Medical Cannabis Act - MedCanG) and 3 (BtMG) of the draft. With the entry into force of the draft law, cannabis is no longer a narcotic by definition and is therefore no longer subject to the BtMG. The definition in Annex 3 of the BtMG will be replaced by that in Section 2 MedCanG: "Cannabis for medical purposes: plants, flowers and other parts of plants belonging to the genus Cannabis that are grown for medical purposes under state control in accordance with Articles 23 and 28(1) of the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs of 1961 of 30 March 1961 (Federal Law Gazette 1973 II p. 1354), as well as delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol including dronabinol and preparations of all the aforementioned substances". However, the narcotics regulations will be replaced by comparable regulations and authorisations. The Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices (BfArM) will remain responsible for the latter as a higher federal authority. From a regulatory perspective, medicinal cannabis will remain a medicinal product or an active pharmaceutical ingredient even after the amendment of the law, meaning that the requirements under medicinal product law will remain in place. As a result, the marketing of irradiated products will continue to require a marketing authorisation in accordance with the Ordinance on Medicinal Products Treated with Radioactive or Ionising Radiation (AMRadV). Only the narcotics license pursuant to Section 3 BtMG will be replaced by a new licence pursuant to the Medicinal Cannabis Act (MedCanG) (see Section 1), which, however, largely corresponds to the previous provisions of the BTMG with regard to the application process and general regulations. However, there are the following differences that are new due to the entry into force: Medicinal cannabis no longer has to be stored and transported like a narcotic.

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Medical cannabis in Germany must comply with the corresponding monographs of the German and European pharmacopoeia. Currently, there are only (non-harmonised) national pharmacopoeial monographs for cannabis flowers (e.g. in the German Pharmacopoeia (Deutsches Arzneibuch (DAB)) and cannabis extracts (DAB) in the EU. The Committee on Herbal Medicinal Products (HMPC) as the European Medicines Agency’s (EMA) committee responsible for compiling and assessing scientific data on herbal substances, preparations and combinations, announced that in view of uniform EU quality requirements (including with respect to import and export of cannabis), further European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) Cannabis monographs are in preparation.

The European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) Suppl. 11.5 is currently available and contains the new Ph. Eur. Monograph on cannabis flowers and the new Ph. Eur. Monograph on Cannabidiol (CBD). According to the current status, the Ph. Eur. Monograph on Cannabis Flowers will replace the currently existing national monographs (NL, DK, D and CH) from the official implementation date (1 July 2024). However, there are various authorities that only want to refer to this monograph from the official translation into German in Germany. The new monograph on cannabis flowers includes Starting materials for the production of extracts, medicinal products that can be prescribed as such (= herbal medicinal products) that are taken by patients by inhalation or oral administration. There are not entirely irrelevant changes compared to the German monograph.

All BtMG permit applications must specify the strains and estimated quantities of medical cannabis involved and any subsequent changes must be reported to the Federal Opium Agency of Germany. The same applies with regard to Sections 7, 8 MedCanG in relation to the future authorisation to trade in medicinal cannabis, although it is now apparent that no expected annual quantities are to be specified. However, it can be assumed that the BfArM will nevertheless enquire about these due to the (albeit somewhat reduced compared to the BtMG) reporting obligations in Sections 16 and 17 MedCanG and the Foreign Narcotics Trade Regulation, which remains applicable (see Section 14 MedCanG).
 
Unlike cannabis, CBD is not subject to German narcotics laws, unless it is synthetic CBD that has been included as a substance that can be prescribed and marketed in Annex 3 of the BtMG, which may or may not be subject to German drug laws depending on its use and dosage. Annex 1 of the Ordinance on the Prescription of Medicinal Products stipulates that CBD is in principle subject to prescription but does not specify a minimum quantity or a specific dosage form. However, a distinction must be made between consumable products that naturally contain CBD and those that are infused with CBD extract; the European Commission considers the latter to be a type of “food” and has recently indicated that all current novel food applications have at least insufficient data on safety and therefore none of the applications can currently lead to approval. In light of the above, various products containing CBD can be found in the German market. There are currently various court decisions that problematize CBD in food (specifically food supplements) and in cosmetics (specifically, mouth oil). On the one hand, CBD is regarded as a medicinal substance and/or as a novel food subject to authorization and therefore unsuitable for use in a foodstuff, and on the other hand as unsuitable for cosmetic use in the mouth, as CBD would ultimately be consumed in this case.

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Cultivation in Germany and Distribution of Medical Cannabis Cultivated in Germany
 
The Cannabis Agency to oversee cultivation, harvesting, processing, quality control, storage, packaging and distribution to wholesalers, pharmacists and manufacturers. The Cannabis Agency also regulates pricing of German-produced medical cannabis products and serves as an intermediary of medical cannabis product sales between manufacturers, wholesalers and pharmacies on a non-profit basis. In late 2018, the Cannabis Agency issued a call for tenders to award licenses for local medical cannabis cultivation and distribution of German-cultivated medical cannabis products. The Cannabis Agency would serve as an intermediary in the supply chain between such cultivation and distribution. In April 2019, three licenses for local cultivation were granted. In consequence three companies in Germany cultivate on behalf of the Cannabis Agency of the BfArM. Each license permitted the holder to grow up to 200kg per year for total production of 2,600kg per year collectively from the 13 cultivation lots and 10,400kg over the four-year license period. In July 2021, the BfArM launched the state sale of cannabis grown in Germany. Since then, pharmacies have been able to purchase medical cannabis in pharmaceutical drug quality for the supply of patients from the BfArM via the portal www.cannabisagentur.de. The sale from the BfArM to pharmacies is at a price of 5.80 euros per gram.
 
The Cannabis Agency has no influence on the actual retail price of medical cannabis products and is not responsible for the import of medical cannabis products and will therefore neither purchase nor distribute imported medical cannabis products. As a wholesaler, the Cannabis Agency sells German-based medical cannabis products in its own name. The previously time-consuming tendering and awarding of contracts for the domestic cultivation of cannabis for medical purposes by the Cannabis Agency and the subsequent purchase and distribution of the domestic harvest yields by the Cannabis Agency from the economic operators determined in the course of the tendering procedure will no longer be necessary in future, due to the entry into force of the MedCanG.
 
 
Import volumes and procedures
 
The current regime permits the importation of cannabis plants and plant parts for medicinal purposes under state control subject to the requirements under the Narcotic Convention, according to which, Germany must estimate the expected demand of medical cannabis products for medical and research purposes for the following year and report such estimates to the International Narcotics Control Board.
 
As a prerequisite to obtaining a German import license, the supplier must grow and harvest in compliance with EU-GACP-Guidelines and manufacture in compliance with EU-GMP-Guidelines and certifications, or alternatively, it is a pure EU-GACP product and the EU-GMP manufacturing steps then take place in Germany. All medical cannabis products imported to Germany must derive from plant material cultivated in a country whose regulations comply with the Narcotic Convention and must comply with the relevant monographs described in the German and European pharmacopeias. While these requirements also apply to the exportation of medical cannabis products, the current German regime does not allow domestically cultivated medical cannabis products to be directly sold to commercial entities other than the Cannabis Agency.
 
Dispensing Exclusively via Pharmacies
 
Medical cannabis products imported pursuant to an import license under the BtMG (and future MedCanG) and AMG/BtMG (and future MedCanG) permits are sold exclusively to wholesalers and pharmacies. Only the pharmacies are authorised for final dispensing to patients on a prescription basis as ‘magistral preparations’, a term used in Europe to refer to medical products prepared in a pharmacy in accordance to a medical prescription for an individual patient. Magistral preparations require certain manufacturing steps in the pharmacy. Such manufacturing steps of the pharmacist typically include the testing and dosing of pre-packaged cannabis inflorescences (typically referred to as “floss”), medical cannabis products for oral administration (dronabinol), medical cannabis products for inhalation upon evaporation, and medical cannabis-infused teas. In addition to magistral preparations, medical cannabis products are also marketable as pre-packaged, licensed drugs (e.g. Sativex®).
 
61

 
No U.S. Cannabis-Related Activities
 
The Group does not engage in any U.S. cannabis-related activities as defined in Canadian Securities Administrators Staff Notice 51-352 (Revised) – Issuers with U.S. Marijuana-Related Activities.
 
Economic Dependence
 
In Israel, the Company is substantially dependent on several categories of commercial agreements to ensure the continuity of its operations and maintain its revenues, including:
 

The intellectual property agreement dated April 2, 2019 and as amended on January 1, 2021, between IMC Holdings and Focus (the “IP Agreement”) and the Services Agreement dated April 2, 2019 and as amended on January 1, 2021, between IMC Holdings and Focus (the “Services Agreement” and together with the IP Agreement, the “Commercial Agreements”), whereby IMC Holdings derives economic benefit from Focus and whereby Focus (i) uses the IMC brand on an exclusive basis for the sale of cannabis products; and (ii) engages IMC Holdings to provide certain management and consulting services. As a result of the Company’s commercial relationship with Focus, it is dependent on Focus maintaining its licenses, as well as any ancillary licenses required to carry on its operations in the Israeli medical cannabis industry.
 
On January 1, 2021, the Company amended the terms of each of the Commercial Agreements to align the consideration with implementation of the Company’s transfer pricing framework.
 

Supply agreements with third party cannabis cultivators and suppliers to meet the Israeli market’s demand for the Company’s products.
 

Purchase orders received from time to time for the sale of the Company’s products to pharmacies or distributors, either in association with Focus or through the Company’s direct trading house operations.
 

Ongoing retail purchases of the Company’s products sold at the Israeli Pharmacies by Israeli medical cannabis patients.
 
For additional information on potential risks arising from the Company’s economic dependence on Focus, its commercial and supply agreements with third parties and its pharmacy operations, see “Risk Factors” above.
 
In Germany, Adjupharm is substantially dependent on the supply, sales and distribution agreements with suppliers, German distributors, and pharmacies. Any failure to maintain the Adjupharm License in good standing could have a material adverse effect on the Group. For additional information on potential risks arising from the Company’s dependence on Adjupharm’s operations, see “Risk Factors” above.

62

 
C.          Organizational Structure
 
The following chart illustrates our subsidiaries:
 
 

For more information on the Company’s discontinued operations. Please see note 25 in the 2023 Annual Financial Statements. For more information, please see the section entitled “Developments During the Financial Year Ended December 31, 2023”.

D.          Property, Plants and Equipment
 
Total depreciated cost of property, plants and equipment as at December 31, 2023 was $5,058, compared to $5,221 as at December 31, 2022, representing a decrease of $163 or 3%.
 
Additional information set forth under Note 10 of the 2023 Annual Financial Statements.
 
IMC Holdings leases a 368 square-meter facility in Kibutz Glil Yam for administrative activities. The lease agreement will expire on September 1, 2026 and will be renewed upon agreement between the parties.
 
IMC Holdings leased an 86.5 square-meter facility in Lod for storage activities. The lease agreement was terminated on June 30, 2023 and the lease term ended on that date.
 
Oranim Pharm leases a 140 square-meter facility in Jerusalem for pharmacy’s selling activities. The lease will expire on August 1, 2027 and will be renewed upon agreement between the parties.

Pharm Yarok leases a 178 square-meter facility in Netanya for pharmacy’s selling activities. The lease was renewed on February 9, 2023 and will expire on December 31, 2024.
 
Adjupharm owns approximately 8,000 square feet of EU-GMP logistics center, which allows Adjupharm to manage all aspects of its supply chain, including the production, repackaging and distribution of bulk medical cannabis.

63

 
ITEM 4A.      UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS
 
Not applicable.
 
Item 5.            Operating and Financial Review and Prospects.
 
A. Operating Results
 
In each of the markets in which the Company operates, the Company must navigate evolving customer and patient trends in order to continue to be competitive with other suppliers of medical cannabis products.
 
The Company believes that there are several key factors creating tailwinds to facilitate further industry growth. In Israel, the number of licensed medical patients continues to increase and currently stands at 137,467 as of February 2024. This figure is expected to continue growing in the coming years and may further benefit from regulatory change liberalizing the cannabis market in Israel. Moreover, the acquisitions of the Israeli Pharmacies positions IM Cannabis as a large distributor of medical cannabis in Israel. As the Israeli cannabis market has become increasingly competitive, the ability to import premium cannabis from Canada is a key determinant of the Company’s success in Israel.
 
The German medical cannabis market has been slower over the past few years to develop mainly due to the difficulty in medical patients accessing prescriptions and insurance reimbursements. Starting Year 2024 after the legalization was officially approved by the Bundestag (Germany Parliament) on March 1st  2024, The Company which  has already seen an increase in the number of patients paying out-of-pocket for medical cannabis products in Germany during the past few years, is expecting a change which will lead to increase in the market.
 
REVENUES
 
The revenues of the Group from continuing operations are primarily generated from sales of medical cannabis products to customers in Israel and Germany. The reportable geographical segments in which the Company operates are Israel and Germany.
 
For the year ended December 31:
 
   
Israel
   
Germany
   
Adjustments
   
Total
 
   
2023
   
2022
   
2023
   
2022
   
2023
   
2022
   
2023
   
2022
 
Revenues
 
$
43,316
   
$
50,500
   
$
5,488
   
$
3,835
   
$
-
   
$
-
   
$
48,804
   
$
54,335
 
Segment income (loss)
 
$
(6,627
)
 
$
(23,606
)
 
$
(1,615
)
 
$
(3,225
)
 
$
-
   
$
-
   
$
(8,242
)
 
$
(26,831
)
Unallocated corporate expenses
 
$
-
   
$
-
   
$
-
   
$
-
   
$
(4,550
)
 
$
(3,960
)
 
$
(4,550
)
 
$
(3,960
)
Total operating (loss) income
 
$
(6,627
)
 
$
(23,606
)
 
$
(1,615
)
 
$
(3,225
)
 
$
(4,550
)
 
$
(3,960
)
 
$
(12,792
)
 
$
(30,791
)
Depreciation,  amortization & impairment
 
$
2,823
   
$
6,747
   
$
173
   
$
200
   
$
-
   
$
-
   
$
2,996
   
$
6,947
 
 
For the three months ended December 31:

   
Israel
   
Germany
   
Adjustments
   
Total
 
   
2023
   
2022
   
2023
   
2022
   
2023
   
2022
   
2023
   
2022
 
Revenues
 
$
9,375
   
$
13,136
   
$
1,323
   
$
1,325
   
$
-
   
$
-
   
$
10,698
   
$
14,461
 
Segment income (loss)
 
$
(3,653
)
 
$
(10,280
)
 
$
(580
)
 
$
(517
)
 
$
-
   
$
-
   
$
(4,233
)
 
$
(10,797
)
Unallocated corporate income (expenses)
 
$
-
   
$
-
   
$
-
   
$
-
   
$
(932
)
 
$
90
   
$
(932
)
 
$
90
 
Total operating (loss) income
 
$
(3,653
)
 
$
(10,280
)
 
$
(580
)
 
$
(517
)
 
$
(932
)
 
$
90
   
$
(5,165
)
 
$
(10,707
)
Depreciation,  amortization & impairment
 
$
684
   
$
4,957
   
$
47
   
$
48
   
$
-
   
$
-
   
$
731
   
$
5,005
 
 
64


The consolidated revenues of the Group from continuing operations for the year ended December 31, 2023, were attributed to the sale of medical cannabis products in Israel and Germany.
 

Revenues from continuing operations for the year ended December 31, 2023 and 2022 were $48,804 and $54,335, respectively, representing a decrease of $5,531 or 10%. Revenues for the three months ended December 31, 2023, and 2022 were $10,698 and $14,461,  respectively, representing a decrease of $3,763 or 26%. The decrease in revenues is primarily attributed to the effects of the Israel – Hamas war and the different challenges it caused from a business perspective effecting the Company sells and also its operation activities such as longer importing cycles (transportation of goods, approvals from relevant authorities etc.)
 

Revenues from the Israeli operation were attributed to the sale of medical cannabis through the Company’s agreement with Focus Medical and the revenues from the Israeli Pharmacies the Company owns, mostly from cannabis products.
 

In Germany, Company revenues were attributed to the sale of medical cannabis through Adjupharm.
 

Total dried flower sold for the year ended December 31, 2023, was 8,609 kg at an average selling price of $5.14 per gram compared to 6,794kg for the same period in 2022 at an average selling price of $7.12 per gram, mainly attributed to the inventory life cycle, discounts given and increased competition in the segment. Total dried flower sold for the three months ended December 31, 2023, was 2,082kg at an average selling price of $4.52 per gram compared to 2,334kg for the three months ended December 31, 2022, at an average selling price of $5.19 per gram. The decreased is mainly attributed to the Israel – Hamas war effect.
 
COST OF REVENUES
 
Cost of revenues is comprised of purchase of raw materials and finished goods, import costs, production costs, product laboratory testing, shipping and salary expenses. Inventory is later expensed to the cost of sales when sold. Direct production costs are expensed through the cost of sales.
 
The cost of revenues from continuing operations for the year ended December 31, 2023 and 2022 were $37,974 and $43,044, respectively, representing a decrease of $5,070 or 12% which is in line with the 10% revenue decreased during the period. The cost of revenues for the three months ended December 31, 2023 and 2022 were $9,583 and $11,670, respectively, representing a decrease of $2,087 or 18% which is in line with the Revenue decreased of 26% during the 3 months period.
 
GROSS PROFIT
 
Gross profit from continuing operations for the year ended December 31, 2023, and 2022 was $9,846 and $9,162, respectively, representing an increase of $684 or 7% this is mainly contributed to the changes in the business activities from own cannabis grow in the farm owned by the Company in Y2022 to importing a premium high quality Cannabis from Canada. For the three months ended December 31, 2023, and 2022 gross profit was $841 and $2,603, respectively, representing a decrease of $1,762 or 68%.
 
Gross profit included losses from unrealized changes in fair value of biological assets and realized fair value adjustments on inventory sold of $(984) and $(2,129) for the year ended December 31, 2023, and 2022, respectively. Losses from unrealized changes in fair value of biological assets and realized fair value adjustments on inventory sold for the three months ended December 31, 2023, and 2022 were $(274) and $(188), respectively.

65

 
There are a few other external circumstances that affected the profitability during year 2023 including of fluctuation in the exchange rate of the CAD vs.NIS, as can be seen in the following graph:
 


YE 2023 results were affected by the CAD/ILS exchange rate (Revenue are mainly in ILS while the COST of Revenue as well as operational expenses are mainly in CAD, therefore any increased strength of the CAD will hit the Gross Profit while any increased strength of the ILS will have the opposite effect.
 
Q4 2023 gross profit is highly affected by the Israel – Hamas war. The main effect was due to sells decrease from one side (equivalent to the effect of the war also in other Israeli markets), and slow inventory transportation processes and regulatory approvals processes which caused delays in Inventory ready for sells during the quarter.
 
EXPENSES
 
GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE
 
General and administrative expenses from continuing operations for the year ended December 31, 2023, and 2022 were $11,008 and $21,460, respectively, representing a decrease of $10,452 or 49%. For the three months ended December 31, 2023, and 2022, general and administrative expenses from continuing operations were $3,300 and $9,790, respectively, representing a decrease of $6,490 or 66%.
 
The decrease in the general and administrative expense is attributable mainly to the two restructuring plans published April 6, 2022 (closing of Focus facility in Israel) and March 8, 2023, which aimed for reorganization of the company's management and operations to strengthen its focus on core activities and drive efficiencies to realize sustainable profitability. The Company reduced its workforce in Israel across all functions. The general and administrative expenses are comprised mainly from salaries to employees in the amount of $2,314 on year 2023 vs $4,027 on year 2022, professional fees in the amount of $4,095 vs $4,689 for the same years , depreciation and amortization in the amount of $669 vs. 819 and  insurance costs in the amount of $1,847 and 1,566 respectively. The decrease in the other General and administrative costs from $10,359 in Year 2022 to $2,083 on year 2023 is mainly attributed to the fair value adjustment occur in Year 2022 of the Company’s purchase option to acquire a pharmacy. See” Subsequent Events – Panaxia Transaction Update” of the 2022 MD&A in a total amount of $7,336.
 
SELLING AND MARKETING
 
Selling and marketing expenses from continuing operations for the year ended December 31, 2023, and 2022 were $10,788 and $11,473, respectively, representing a decrease of $685 or 6%. For the three months ended December 31, 2023, selling and marketing expenses from continuing operations were $2,797, compared to $3,094 for the three months ended December 31, 2022, representing a decrease of $297 or 10%. The decrease in the selling and marketing expenses was due mainly to decrease salaries to employees in the amount of $5,677 on year 2023 vs $6,398 on year 2022, Selling and marketing in the amount of $1,568 and 2,075 for the same years, increase of depreciation and amortization to $2,320 from $1,941 respectively.

66

 
RESTRUCTURING EXPENSES
 
On April 6, 2022, Focus Medical announced its decision, from March 30, 2022, to close the Focus Facility in Israel and therefore the Company recorded restructuring expenses related to impairment of property, plant and equipment, biological assets and right of use asset and liabilities, in the total amount of $4,383.
 
On March 8, 2023, the Company announced its strategy plan in Israel of reorganization of the company's management and operations in order to strengthen its focus on core activities and drive efficiencies to realize sustainable profitability. The Company reduced its workforce in Israel by 36% across all functions (including executives). Therefore, the Company recorded restructuring expenses for the year ended December 31, 2023 related mainly to salaries to employees in the amount of $617.
 
SHARE-BASD COMPENSATION
 
Share-based compensation expense from continuing operations for the year ended December 31, 2023, and 2022 was $225 and $2,637, respectively, representing a decrease $2,412 or 91%. For the three months ended December 31, 2023, and 2022, share-based compensation expense was $(91) and $428, respectively, representing a decrease of $519 or 121%. The decrease for the year ended December 31, 2023, in expenses was mainly attributed to the cancellation of incentive stock options (“Options”) held by employees who no longer worked for the Company.
 
FINANCING
 
Financing income (expense) net from continuing operations for the year ended December 31, 2023, and 2022 was $3,335 and $4,731, respectively, representing a decrease of $1,396 or 30% in the financing income. For the three months ended December 31, 2023, and 2022, financing income (expense), net was $2,466 and $949, respectively, representing an increase of $1,517 or 160%.
 
NET INCOME/LOSS
 
Net loss for the year ended December 31, 2023, and 2022 was $10,228 and $191,301, respectively, representing a net loss decrease of $181,073 or 95%. For the three months ended December 31, 2023, and 2022, net loss was $3,520 and $33,449, respectively, representing a net loss increase of $29,929 or 89%. The net loss decrease related to factors impacting net income described above, and loss from discontinued operations in the amount of $166,379 recorded in the year ended December 31, 2022 related to the discontinued operations in Canada.
 
NET INCOME (LOSS) PER SHARE BASIC AND DILUTED
 
Basic loss per share is calculated by dividing the net profit attributable to holders of Common Shares by the weighted average number of Common Shares outstanding during the period. Diluted profit per Common Share is calculated by adjusting the earnings and number of Common Shares for the effects of dilutive warrants and other potentially dilutive securities. The weighted average number of Common Shares used as the denominator in calculating diluted profit per Common Share excludes unissued Common Shares related to Options as they are antidilutive. Basic Income (Loss) per Common Share from continuing operations for the year ended December 31, 2023, and 2022 were $(0.74) and $(3.13) per Common Share, respectively. For the three months ended December 31, 2023, and 2022 were $(0.25) and $(2.94), respectively.
 
Diluted Income (Loss) per Common Share from continuing operations for the year ended December 31, 2023 and 2022 were $(0.74) and $(3.81) per Common Share, respectively. Diluted Income (Loss) per Common Share for the three months ended December 31, 2023, and 2022 were $(0.25) and $(3.55), respectively.
 
TOTAL ASSETS
 
Total assets as of December 31, 2023 were $48,813, compared to $60,675 as at December 31, 2022, representing a decrease of $11,862 or 20%. This decrease was primarily due to the reduction of cash and cash equivalents in the amount of $636 and inventory reduction of $6,609. Additional decrease is attributed to currency fluctuation effected the translation of items denominated in NIS in the Company’s balance sheet.

67

 
INVESTMENT IN XINTEZA
 
On December 26, 2019, IMC Holdings entered into a share purchase agreement with Xinteza API Ltd. (“Xinteza”), a company with a unique biosynthesis technology, whereby the Company acquired, on an as-converted and fully diluted basis, 25.37% of Xinteza’s outstanding share capital, for consideration of US$1,700 (approximately $2,165 as of December 31, 2021) paid in several installments (the “Xinteza SPA”). As of December 31, 2022, the Company has paid all outstanding installments pertaining to the Xinteza SPA and currently holds 23.35% of the outstanding share capital of Xinteza on an as-converted and fully diluted basis. On February 24, 2022, IMC Holdings entered into a simple agreement for future equity with Xinteza, under which IMC Holdings paid US$100 (approximately $125), in exchange for the right to certain shares of Xinteza, (see also the financial statements note 17c).
 
TOTAL LIABILITIES
 
Total liabilities as of December 31, 2023, were $35,113, compared to $36,879 at December 31, 2022, representing a decrease of $1,766 or 5%. The decrease was mainly due to the reduction in trade payables in the amount of $6,089, off set by increase in bank loans and credit facilities in the amount of $2,873, and a decrease in other payables in the amount of $629. Additional decrease is attributed to the effect of translation of items denominated in NIS in the Company’s balance sheet.
 
B.           Liquidity and Capital Resources
 
For the twelve months ended December 31, 2023, the Company recorded revenues of $48,804.
 
The Company can face liquidity fluctuations from time to time, resulting from delays in sales and slow inventory movements.
 
In January 2022, Focus entered into a revolving credit facility with an Israeli bank, Bank Mizrahi (the “Mizrahi Facility”). The Mizrahi Facility is guaranteed by Focus assets. Advances from the Mizrahi Facility will be used for working capital needs. The Mizrahi Facility has a total commitment of up to NIS 15 million (approximately $6,000) and has a one-year term for on-going needs and 6 months term for imports and purchases needs. The Mizrahi Facility is renewable upon mutual agreement by the parties. The borrowing base is available for draw at any time throughout the Mizrahi Facility and is subject to several covenants to be measured on a quarterly basis (the “Mizrahi Facility Covenants”).

The Mizrahi Facility bears interest at the Israeli Prime interest rate plus 1.5%. During the first quarter of 2023 the Company reduced total commitment to NIS 10,000 (approx. $3,600) and as of September 30, 2023 Focus has drawn down $nil in respect of the Mizrahi Facility.

On May 17, 2023, the Company and Bank Mizrahi entered to new credit facility with total commitment of up to NIS 10,000 (approximately $3,600) (the “New Mizrahi Facility”). The New Mizrahi Facility consists of NIS 5,000 credit line and NIS 5,000 loan to be settled with 24 monthly installments from May 17, 2023. This loan bears interest at the Israeli Prime interest rate plus 2.9%. As of December 31, 2023 Focus has drawn down $3,227 in respect of the new Mizrahi facility (comprised of approx. $1,827 credit line and $1,400 loan). The New Credit facility is also subject to several covenants to be measured on a quarterly basis which are not met as of December 31, 2023, therefore the loan is classified as short-term loan.

The Company's CEO and director, provided to the bank a personal guarantee in the amount of the outstanding borrowed amount, allowing the New Mizrahi Facility to remain effective.

Between January 16, 2023 to February 16, 2023, the Company completed the LIFE Offering, comprised of an aggregate of 2,828,248 Units issued and sold under the Life Offering for an aggregate gross proceeds of US$3,535, such amount exclusive of 131,700 Units issued to a director of the Company as part of the LIFE Offering whose subscription price was satisfied by the settlement of US$164 in debt owed by the Company to the director.
Concurrently, the Company completed the Concurrent Offering, comprised of an aggregate of 2,317,171 Units issued and sold under the Concurrent Offering for an aggregate gross proceeds of US$2,896.

As of December 31, 2023, the Group's cash and cash equivalents totaled $1,813 and the Group's working capital deficit from continuing operations (current assets less current liabilities) amounted to ($8,543). In the year ended December 31, 2023, the Group had an operating loss from continuing operation of ($12,792) and negative cash flows from continuing operating activities of ($5,075).

68

 

The Group’s current operating budget includes various assumptions concerning the level and timing of cash receipts from sales and cash outlays for operating expenses and capital expenditures. The Company is managing its cash flow daily and will look for external funding for its operations. Cost saving plans and restructuring actions taken in 2022 and in 2023. The Company’s board of directors approved a cost saving plan, implemented in whole or in part, to allow the Company to continue its operations and meet its cash obligations. The cost saving plan consists of cost reduction due to efficiencies and synergies, which include mainly the following steps: discontinuing operation of loss-making activities, reduction in payroll and headcount, reduction in compensation paid to key management personnel (including layoffs of key executives), operational efficiencies and reduced capital expenditures.

These conditions raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. The Annual Financial Statements do not include any adjustments relating to the recoverability and classification of assets or liabilities that might be necessary should the Company be unable to continue as a going concern.
 
As of December 31, 2023, the Group’s financial liabilities consisted of accounts payable which have contractual maturity dates within one year. The Group manages its liquidity risk by reviewing its capital requirements on an ongoing basis. Based on the Group’s working capital position on December 31, 2023, management considers liquidity risk to be high.
 
As of December 31, 2023, the Group has identified the following liquidity risks related to financial liabilities (undiscounted):
 

   
Less than one year
   
1 to 5 years
   
6 to 10 years
   
> 10 years
 
Contractual Obligations
 
$
12,618
   
$
1,293
     
-
     
-
 
 
The maturity profile of the Company’s other financial liabilities (trade payables, other account payable and accrued expenses, and warrants) as of December 31, 2023, are less than one year.
 
 
Payments Due by Period
 
Contractual Obligations
 
Total
   
Less than one year
   
1 to 3 years
   
4 to 5 years
   
After 5 years
 
Debt
 
$
12,513
   
$
12,119
   
$
394
   
$
-
   
$
-
 
Finance Lease Obligations
 
$
1,398
   
$
499
   
$
814
   
$
85
   
$
-
 
Total Contractual Obligations
 
$
13,911
   
$
12,618
   
$
1,208
   
$
85
   
$
-
 
 
The Annual Financial Statements have been prepared on the basis of accounting principles applicable to a going concern, which assumes that the Company will continue in operation for the foreseeable future and will be able to realize its assets and discharge its liabilities in the normal course of operations. The Annual Financial Statements do not include any adjustments to the amounts and classification of assets and liabilities that would be necessary should the Company be unable to continue as a going concern. Such adjustments could be material.

69

 
C.          Research and Development, Patents and Licenses, etc.
 
For a discussion of our licenses, see “Item 4.B. Business Overview.”
 
Canada

The Company is concentrating on leveraging its skilled sourcing team and strategic alliances with Canadian suppliers and imports medical cannabis from third-party licensed facilities in Canada. The Company continues to import cannabis products and supply medical cannabis to patients through licensed pharmacies. To supplement growing demand, the Company continue its relationships with third-party cultivation facilities in Israel for the propagation and cultivation of the Company’s existing proprietary genetics and for the development of new products.

In addition, the Company is operating through its subsidiaries who obtained a license from the IMCA to, among others, import cannabis products and supply medical cannabis to patients.

Israel

Pursuant to the applicable Israeli cannabis regulations, following the import of medical cannabis, medical cannabis products are then packaged by contracted GMP licensed producers of medical cannabis. The packaged medical cannabis products are then sold by the Group under the Company’s brands to local Israeli pharmacies directly or through contracted distributors.

Germany

The Company continues to expand its presence in the German market by forging partnerships with pharmacies and distributors across the country and developing Adjupharm and its Logistics Center as the Company’s European hub. Adjupharm sources its supply of medical cannabis for the German market and from various EU-GMP certified European and Canadian suppliers. The Logistics Center is EU-GMP certified, upgrading Adjupharm’s production technology and increasing its storage capacity to accommodate its anticipated growth. Adjupharm has a certification for primary repackaging, making it one of a handful of companies in Germany fully licenced to repack bulk.

Adjupharm currently holds wholesale, narcotics handling, manufacturing, procurement, storage, distribution, and import/export licenses granted to it by the applicable German regulatory authorities.
 
D.          Trend Information
 
In each of the markets in which the Company operates, the Company must navigate evolving customer and patient trends in order to continue to be competitive with other suppliers of medical cannabis products.
 
The Company believes that there are several key factors creating tailwinds to facilitate further industry growth. In Israel, the number of licensed medical patients continues to increase and currently stands at 137,467 as of February 2024. This figure is expected to continue growing in the coming years and may further benefit from regulatory change liberalizing the cannabis market in Israel. Moreover, the acquisitions of the Israeli Pharmacies positions IM Cannabis as a large distributor of medical cannabis in Israel. As the Israeli cannabis market has become increasingly competitive, the ability to import premium cannabis from Canada is a key determinant of the Company’s success in Israel.
 
The German medical cannabis market has been slower over the past few years to develop mainly due to the difficulty in medical patients accessing prescriptions and insurance reimbursements. Starting Year 2024 after the legalization was officially approved by the Bundestag (Germany Parliament) on March 1st  2024, the Company which  has already seen an increase in the number of patients paying out-of-pocket for medical cannabis products in Germany during the past few years, is expecting a change which will lead to increase in the market.
 
Other than as disclosed here and elsewhere in this Annual Report, we are not aware of any trends, uncertainties, demands, commitments or events for the period from January 1, 2023 to December 31, 2023 that are reasonably likely to have a material adverse effect on our net revenues, income from continuing operations, profitability, liquidity or capital resources, or that would cause our reported financial information not necessarily to be indicative of future operating results or financial condition. For a discussion of trends, see “Item 4.B.- Business Overview.”
 
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E.          Critical Accounting Estimates
 
The consolidated financial statements of the Group have been prepared in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards ("IFRS"), as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board ("IASB"). The Group's financial statements have been prepared on a cost basis, except for:
 
-          Financial instruments which are presented at fair value through profit or loss.
 
-          Biological assets which are presented at fair value less cost to sell up to the point of harvest.
 
In the process of applying the significant accounting policies, the Group has made the following judgments which have the most significant effect on the amounts recognized in the financial statements:
 
Functional currency, presentation currency and foreign currency
 
The functional currency of the Company is the Canadian dollar ("CAD"). The Group determines the functional currency of each Group entity.
 
Assets, including fair value adjustments upon acquisition, and liabilities of an investee which is a foreign operation, and of each Group entity for which the functional currency is not the presentation currency are translated at the closing rate at each reporting date. Profit or loss items are translated at average exchange rates for all periods presented. The resulting translation differences are recognized in other comprehensive income (loss). Upon the full or partial disposal of a foreign operation resulting in loss of control in the foreign operation, the cumulative gain (loss) from the foreign operation which had been recognized in other comprehensive income is transferred to profit or loss. Upon the partial disposal of a foreign operation which results in the retention of control in the subsidiary, the relative portion of the amount recognized in other comprehensive income is reattributed to non-controlling interests.
 
Transactions denominated in foreign currency are recorded upon initial recognition at the exchange rate at the date of the transaction. After initial recognition, monetary assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currency are translated at each reporting date into the functional currency at the exchange rate at that date. Exchange rate differences, other than those capitalized to qualifying assets or accounted for as hedging transactions in equity, are recognized in profit or loss. Non-monetary assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currency and measured at cost are translated at the exchange rate at the date of the transaction. Non-monetary assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currency and measured at fair value are translated into the functional currency using the exchange rate prevailing at the date when the fair value was determined.
 
JUDGMENTS
 
Determining the fair value of share-based payment transactions
 
The fair value of share-based payment transactions is determined upon initial recognition by an acceptable option pricing model. The inputs to the model include share price, exercise price and assumptions regarding expected volatility, expected life of share option and expected dividend yield.
 
Variable lease payments that depend on an index:
 
On the commencement date, the Group uses the index rate prevailing on the commencement date to calculate the future lease payments. For leases in which the Group is the lessee, the aggregate changes in future lease payments resulting from a change in the index are discounted (without a change in the discount rate applicable to the lease liability) and recorded as an adjustment of the lease liability and the right-of-use asset, only when there is a change in the cash flows resulting from the change in the index (that is, when the adjustment to the lease payments takes effect).

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ESTIMATES AND ASSUMPTIONS
 
The preparation of the financial statements requires management to make estimates and assumptions that influence the application of the accounting policies and on the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues, and expenses. Changes in accounting estimates are reported in the period of the change in estimate.
 
The key assumptions made in the financial statements concerning uncertainties at the reporting date and the critical estimates computed by the Group that may result in a material adjustment to the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities within the next financial year are discussed below.
 
ASSESSMENT OF GOING CONCERN
 
The use of the going concern basis of preparation of the financial statements. At each reporting period, management assesses the basis of preparation of the financial statements. The going concern basis of presentation assumes that the Company will continue its operations for the foreseeable future and be able to realize its assets and discharge its liabilities and commitments in the normal course of business.
 
The Group’s current operating budget includes various assumptions concerning the level and timing of cash receipts from sales and cash outlays for operating expenses and capital expenditures. Restructuring Plans and actions taken in 2022 and in 2023. The Company’s board of directors approved on year 2023 a cost saving plan, to allow the Company to continue its operations and meet its cash obligations. The cost saving plan consists of cost reduction due to efficiencies and synergies, which include mainly the following steps: discontinued operations of loss-making activities, reduction in payroll and headcount, reduction in compensation paid to key management personnel (including layoffs of key executives), operational efficiencies and reduced capital expenditures. On year 2024, the company will work for fund and/or debt raising and will continue with cost savings effort as well as increased efficiency.
 
These conditions raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. The consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments relating to the recoverability and classification of assets or liabilities that might be necessary should the Company be unable to continue as a going concern.
 
BIOLOGICAL ASSETS
 
The Group’s biological assets consist of cannabis plants. The Group capitalizes the direct and indirect costs incurred related to the biological transformation of the biological assets between the point of initial recognition and the point of harvest. The direct and indirect costs of biological assets are determined using an approach similar to the capitalization criteria outlined in IAS 2, Inventory. These costs include the direct cost of planting and growing materials as well as other indirect costs such as utilities and supplies used in the cultivation process. Indirect labor for individuals involved in the cultivation and quality control process is also included, as well as depreciation on growing equipment and overhead costs such as rent to the extent it is associated with the growing space. All direct and indirect costs of biological assets are capitalized as they are incurred, and they are all subsequently recorded within the line item cost of revenues on the Group’s statements of profit or loss and other comprehensive income in the period that the related product is sold. The Group then measures the biological assets at fair value less cost to sell up to the point of harvest, which becomes the basis for the cost of inventory after harvest. The fair value is determined using a model which estimates the expected harvest yield in grams for plants currently being cultivated, and then adjusts that amount for the expected selling price per gram and also for any additional costs to be incurred (e.g., post-harvest costs). The net unrealized gains or losses arising from changes in fair value less cost to sell during the period are included in the gross profit for the related period and are recorded in a separate line on the face of the Group’s statements of profit or loss and other comprehensive income. Determination of the fair values of the biological assets requires the Group to make assumptions about how market participants assign fair values to these assets. These assumptions primarily relate to the level of effort required to bring the cannabis up to the point of harvest, costs to convert the harvested cannabis to finished goods, sales price, risk of loss, expected future yields from the cannabis plants and estimating values during the growth cycle. The Group accretes fair value on a straight-line basis according to stage of growth (e.g., a cannabis plant that is 50% through its growing cycle would be ascribed approximately 50% of its harvest date expected fair value, subject to wastage adjustments).
 
The fair value of biological assets is categorized within Level 3 of the fair value hierarchy. For the inputs and assumptions used in determining the fair value of biological assets. The Group’s estimates are, by their nature, subject to change and differences from the anticipated yield will be reflected in the gain or loss on biological assets in future periods.
 
As of December 31, 2022 and 2023, the Company does not hold biological assets.

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BUSINESS COMBINATIONS AND GOODWILL
 
Business combinations are accounted for by applying the acquisition method. The cost of the acquisition is measured at the fair value of the consideration transferred on the acquisition date with the addition of non-controlling interests in the acquiree. In each business combination, the Company chooses whether to measure the non-controlling interests in the acquiree based on their fair value on the acquisition date or at their proportionate share in the fair value of the acquiree's net identifiable assets. Direct acquisition costs are carried to the statement of profit or loss as incurred.
 
In a business combination achieved in stages, equity interests in the acquiree that had been held by the acquirer prior to obtaining control are measured at the acquisition date fair value while recognizing a gain or loss resulting from the revaluation of the prior investment on the date of achieving control. Contingent consideration is recognized at fair value on the acquisition date and classified as a financial asset or liability in accordance with IFRS 9. Subsequent changes in the fair value of the contingent consideration are recognized in profit or loss. If the contingent consideration is classified as an equity instrument, it is measured at fair value on the acquisition date without subsequent remeasurement.
 
Goodwill is initially measured at cost which represents the excess of the acquisition consideration and the amount of non-controlling interests over the net identifiable assets acquired and liabilities assumed. If the resulting amount is negative, the acquirer recognizes the resulting gain on the acquisition date
 
IMPAIRMENT OF FINANCIAL ASSETS
 
The Group evaluates at the end of each reporting period the loss allowance for financial debt instruments measured at amortized cost. The Group has short-term financial assets, principally trade receivables, in respect of which the Group applies a simplified approach and measures the loss allowance in an amount equal to the lifetime expected credit losses. The impairment loss, if any, is recognized in profit or loss with a corresponding allowance that is offset from the carrying amount of the assets.
 
IMPAIRMENT OF NON-FINANCIAL ASSETS
 
The Group evaluates the need to record an impairment of non-financial assets whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount is not recoverable. If the carrying amount of non-financial assets exceeds their recoverable amount, the assets are reduced to their recoverable amount. The recoverable amount is the higher of fair value less costs of sale and value in use. In measuring value in use, the expected future cash flows are discounted using a pre-tax discount rate that reflects the risks specific to the asset. The recoverable amount of an asset that does not generate independent cash flows is determined for the cash-generating unit to which the asset belongs. Impairment losses are recognized in profit or loss. An impairment loss of an asset, other than goodwill, is reversed only if there have been changes in the estimates used to determine the asset's recoverable amount since the last impairment loss was recognized. Reversal of an impairment loss, as above, shall not be increased above the lower of the carrying amount that would have been determined (net of depreciation or amortization) had no impairment loss been recognized for the asset in prior years and its recoverable amount. The reversal of impairment loss of an asset presented at cost is recognized in profit or loss.
 
The following criteria are applied in assessing impairment of these specific assets:
 
The Group reviews goodwill for impairment once a year, on December 31, or more frequently if events or changes in circumstances indicate that there is an impairment.
 
Goodwill is tested for impairment by assessing the recoverable amount of the cash-generating unit (or group of cash-generating units) to which the goodwill has been allocated. The Company identified the operations in Israel, Canada, and Europe as three separate cash-generating units.
 
An impairment loss is recognized if the recoverable amount of the cash-generating unit (or group of cash-generating units) to which goodwill has been allocated is less than the carrying amount of the cash-generating unit (or group of cash-generating units). Any impairment loss is allocated first to goodwill. Impairment losses recognized for goodwill cannot be reversed in subsequent periods.

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LEGAL CLAIMS
 
A provision for claims is recognized when the Group has a present legal or constructive obligation as a result of a past event, it is more likely than not that an outflow of resources embodying economic benefits will be required by the Group to settle the obligation and a reliable estimate can be made of the amount of the obligation.
 
PUT OPTION GRANTED TO NON-CONTROLLING INTERESTS
 
When the Group grants non-controlling interests a put option, the non-controlling interests are classified as a financial liability and are not accorded their share in the subsidiary's earnings. At each reporting date, the financial liability is measured on the basis of the estimated present value of the consideration to be transferred upon the exercise of the put option / based on the fair value of the consideration. Changes in the amount of the liability are recorded in profit or loss.
 
DEFERRED TAX
 
Deferred taxes are computed in respect of temporary differences between the carrying amounts in the financial statements and the amounts attributed for tax purposes. Deferred taxes are measured at the tax rate that is expected to apply when the asset is realized or the liability is settled, based on tax laws that have been enacted or substantively enacted by the reporting date.
 
Deferred tax assets are reviewed at each reporting date and reduced to the extent that it is not probable that they will be utilized. Deductible carry forward losses and temporary differences for which deferred tax assets had not been recognized are reviewed at each reporting date and a respective deferred tax asset is recognized to the extent that their utilization is probable.
 
Deferred taxes in respect of investment property that is held with the objective of recovering substantially all of the economic benefits embedded in the investment property through sale and not through use are measured in accordance with the expected manner of recovery of the base asset, on the basis of sale rather than use.
 
When the Company owns an investment in a single property company and the manner in which the Company expects to dispose of the investment is by selling the shares of the property company rather than by selling the property itself, the Company recognizes deferred taxes for both inside temporary differences arising from the difference between the carrying amount of the property and its tax basis, and for outside temporary differences arising from the difference between the tax basis of the investment and the Company's carrying amount of the net assets of the investment in the consolidated financial statements. Taxes that would apply in the event of the disposal of investments in investees have not been considered in computing deferred taxes, if the disposal of the investments in investees is not probable in the foreseeable future. Also, deferred taxes that would apply in the event of distribution of earnings by investees as dividends have not been considered in computing deferred taxes, since the distribution of dividends does not involve an additional tax liability or since it is the Company's policy not to initiate distribution of dividends from a subsidiary that would trigger an additional tax liability. Taxes on income that relate to distributions of an equity instrument and to transaction costs of an equity transaction are accounted for pursuant to IAS 12.  Deferred taxes are offset if there is a legally enforceable right to offset a current tax asset against a current tax liability and the deferred taxes relate to the same taxpayer and the same taxation authority.
 
SHARE-BASED PAYMENTS
 
The Company uses the Black-Scholes option pricing model in determining the fair value of Options issued to employees. In estimating fair value, the Company is required to make certain assumptions and estimates such as the expected life of the options, volatility of the Company’s future share price, the risk-free rate, future dividend yields and estimated forfeiture rates at the initial grant date.
 
ESTIMATED USEFUL LIVES AND DEPRECIATION/AMORTIZATION OF PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT, AS WELL AS INTANGIBLE ASSETS
 
Property, plant and equipment are measured at cost, including directly attributable costs, less accumulated depreciation, accumulated impairment losses and excluding day-to-day servicing expenses. Cost includes spare parts and auxiliary equipment that are used in connection with plant and equipment.  A part of an item of property, plant and equipment with a cost that is significant in relation to the total cost of the item is depreciated separately using the component method.
 
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Depreciation of property, plant and equipment is dependent upon estimates of useful lives and residual values which are determined through the exercise of judgement and calculated on a straight-line basis over the useful lives of the assets at annual rates.
 
LEASES
 
Judgment is used in determining the value of the Company’s right-of-use assets and lease liabilities. The value determined for the Company’s right-of-use assets and lease liabilities can be materially different based on the discount rate selected to present value the future lease payments as well as the likelihood of the Company exercising extensions, termination, and/or purchase options. The discount rate used to present value the future lease payments over the life of the lease is based on the Company’s incremental borrowing rate at inception of the lease. This rate is determined by the Company using judgment.
 
In determining the value of the Company’s right-of-use assets and lease liabilities, the Company assesses future business plans to determine whether to include certain extension options noted in the lease agreement.
 
If there is no interest rate implicit in the lease agreement, the Company uses a discount rate that would be charged to a similar borrower, with similar risk characteristics, in a mortgage loan to purchase the leased facility. This discount rate is used to present value the future lease payments in determining the right-of-use asset and lease liability values at inception of the leases.
 
DETERMINING THE FAIR VALUE OF AN UNQUOTED FINANCIAL ASSETS AND LIABILITIES
 
The fair value of unquoted financial assets in Level 3 of the fair value hierarchy is determined using valuation techniques, generally using future cash flows discounted at current rates applicable for items with similar terms and risk characteristics. changes in estimated future cash flows and estimated discount rates, after consideration of risks such as liquidity risk, credit risk and volatility, are liable to affect the fair value of these assets.
 
REVENUE RECOGNITION
 
Revenue from contracts with customers is recognized when the control over the goods or services is transferred to the customer. The transaction price is the amount of the consideration that is expected to be received based on the contract terms, excluding amounts collected on behalf of third parties (such as taxes). In determining the amount of revenue from contracts with customers, the Group evaluates whether it is a principal or an agent in the arrangement. The Group is a principal when the Group controls the promised goods or services before transferring them to the customer. In these circumstances, the Group recognizes revenue for the gross amount of the consideration. When the Group is an agent, it recognizes revenue for the net amount of the consideration, after deducting the amount due to the principal.
 
REVENUE FROM THE SALE OF GOODS
 
Revenue from the sale of cannabis products is generally recognized at a point in time when control over the goods have been transferred to the customer. Payment is typically due prior to or upon delivery and revenue is recognized upon the satisfaction of the performance obligation. The Group satisfies its performance obligation and transfers control upon delivery and acceptance by the customer.
 
Variable consideration:
 
The Group determines the transaction price separately for each contract with a customer. When exercising this judgment, the Group evaluates the effect of each variable amount in the contract, taking into consideration discounts, penalties, variations, claims, and non-cash consideration. In determining the effect of the variable consideration, the Group normally uses the "most likely amount" method described in the Standard. Pursuant to this method, the amount of the consideration is determined as the single most likely amount in the range of possible consideration amounts in the contract. According to the Standard, variable consideration is included in the transaction price only to the extent that it is highly probable that a significant reversal in the amount of revenue recognized will not occur when the uncertainty associated with the variable consideration is subsequently resolved.
 
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Bill-and-hold arrangements:
 
Due to strict regulations of security, storage and handling large quantities of cannabis products, the Group's customers may request the Group to retain physical possession of a sold product until it is delivered to the customer at a future point in time. Revenue from bill-and-hold sales is recognized before the product is physically delivered to the customer when all of the following criteria are met:
 
a) The reason for the bill-and-hold arrangement is substantive (for example, the customer has requested the arrangement);
 
b) The product is identified separately as belonging to the customer;
 
c) The product currently is ready for physical delivery to the customer;
 
d) The Group does not have the ability to use the product by selling it or delivering it to another customer.
 
CHANGES IN ACCOUNTING POLICIES INCLUDING INITIAL ADOPTION
 
a. Amendments to IAS 21, "The Effects of Changes in Foreign Exchange Rates":
 
In August 2023, the IASB issued "Amendments to IAS 21: Lack of Exchangeability (Amendments to IAS 21, "The Effects of Changes in Foreign Exchange Rates")" ("the Amendments") to clarify how an entity should assess whether a currency is exchangeable and how it should measure and determine a spot exchange rate when exchangeability is lacking.
 
The Amendments set out the requirements for determining the spot exchange rate when a currency lacks exchangeability. The Amendments require disclosure of information that will enable users of financial statements to understand how a currency not being exchangeable affects or is expected to affect the entity's financial performance, financial position and cash flows.
 
The Amendments apply for annual reporting periods beginning on or after January 1, 2025. Earlier adoption is permitted, in which case, an entity is required to disclose that fact. When applying the Amendments, an entity should not restate comparative information. Instead, if the foreign currency is not exchangeable at the beginning of the annual reporting period in which the Amendments are first applied (the initial application date), the entity should translate affected assets, liabilities and equity as required by the Amendments and recognize the differences as of the initial application date as an adjustment to the opening balance of retained earnings and/or to the foreign currency translation reserve, as required by the Amendments .
 
The Company believes that the Amendments are not expected to have a material impact on its consolidated financial statements.

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ITEM 6.          DIRECTORS, SENIOR MANAGEMENT AND EMPLOYEES
 
A.          Directors and Senior Management
 
The following table sets forth certain information with respect to our executive officers and directors as of March 28, 2024:
 
Name
Position(s) with the Company
Other Directorships
Date of Initial Appointment
Oren Shuster
Chief Executive Officer and Director
IMC Holdings;
Focus;
Pharm Yarok;
Rosen High Way;
IMC Pharma;
IMC Farms;
Ewave Group Ltd (“Ewave”) and its subsidiaries
October 11, 2019
Marc Lustig
Executive Chairman and Director
PharmaCielo Ltd.
Cresco Labs Inc.
Aequus Pharmaceuticals Inc.
22 Capital Corp.
BriaCell Therapeutics Corp.
October 11, 2019
Moti Marcus(2)(3)(4)
Director
Nil
September 12, 2022
Einat Zakariya(2)(3)(4)
Director
HYGEAR Inc.
September 12, 2022
Brian Schinderle(2)(3)
Director
Nil
February 22, 2021
Uri Birenberg
Chief Financial Officer
Nil
October 10, 2023
Eyal Fisher
Chief Executive Officer of IMC Holdings and each of the Israeli Subsidiaries
Nil
March 8, 2023
Michal Lebovitz Nissimov
General Counsel
Nil
April 14, 2023
Richard Balla
Chief Executive Officer of Adjupharm
Nil
October 11, 2019
 
Notes
 

(1)
Information furnished by the respective individual.

(2)
Member of the Audit Committee.

(3)
Member of Compensation Committee.

(4)
Member of the Governance and Nomination Committee.

The following are brief biographies of our directors and executive officers:
 
Oren Shuster
 
Mr. Shuster has served as the Chief Executive Officer of the Company since October 2019, founder and director of IMC Holdings since 2018, founder and director of Focus since 2010 and founder of Ewave and its subsidiaries.
 
Marc Lustig
 
Mr. Lustig has served as Executive Chairman of the Company since December 2020. Mr Lustig is also a Director of Pharmacielo Ltd. since November 2020, a Director of Cresco Labs Inc. since June 2020. Mr. Lustig is the Founder, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of CannaRoyalty Corp. (dba Origin House) from 2016 to 2020 and a Director of Briacell Therapeutics Corp. since September 2021.
 
Moti Marcus
 
Mr. Marcus has served as the Chief Executive Officer of Packer Quality Metals Ltd., one of Israel’s largest metal processing companies, since 2020. Mr. Marcus served as the Chief Financial Officer and deputy Chief Executive Officer of S. Cohen Metal Works Ltd. and Chief Executive Officer of Aviv Shigur. Mr. Marcus is an experienced executive and manager, having worked on outlining business strategies, executive strategies, financial management, mergers and acquisitions, and restructuring. Mr. Marcus completed his bachelor’s degree in economics and accounting at Bar Ilan University and Tel Aviv University and his master’s degree in business management and finance at Bar Ilan University.

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Einat Zakariya
 
Ms. Zakariya has served as the Chief Executive Officer and Partner of Liv collection, a subsidiary of Ewave Holdings Ltd., since 2018. Ms. Zakariya previously served as the Chief Executive Officer and Partner in The Promised Land, a subsidiary of Ewave Nadlan International Investments Ltd., from 2014 to 2018. Ms. Zakariya is experienced in the hotel industry and real and estate business, including negotiations with capital investors and institutional partner entities, as well as development, marketing and sales. Ms. Zakariya also currently serves on the board of directors of HYGEAR Inc., a sport technology company.
 
Brian Schinderle
 
Mr. Schinderle is the Co-founder and Principal of SSC Advisors, a boutique Mergers & Acquisitions and Strategic Advisory business focused primarily on the cannabis market. He is also the Founder and Managing Partner of Solidum Capital Advisors LLC (“Solidum”). Solidum invests its own capital and works in a merchant banking and advisory capacity with a select group of companies in the cannabis sector. In addition, from 2018 to 2020, Mr. Schinderle served as Executive Vice President of Finance of GR Companies Inc. (dba Grassroots Cannabis) (“Grassroots”), focusing on finance, strategy, capital markets, investor relations, mergers and acquisitions. In July 2020, Grassroots merged with Curaleaf Holdings, Inc. (CSE: CURA) in a transaction valued at approximately US$850,000. Prior to forming Solidum in 2017, Mr. Schinderle spent over 20 years in investment management, primarily investing in fixed income and equity assets via hedge funds, private equity and discretely managed funds. Mr. Schinderle currently serves on the advisory boards of GLP Partners (dba Greenlight Cannabis), Altitude Investments Inc. and AIM PLC.
 
Uri Birenberg
 
Uri Birenberg joined the Company as the CFO on October 10, 2023. He is a senior financial executive, who brings over two decades of experience of financial planning and analysis. Prior to joining IMC, from 2021 to 2023, Mr. Birenberg served as CFO of Hygear Ltd., a start up in the healthcare fitness tech industry. In addition to managing the financial and legal activities of the company along with the strategic financial planning, he played an essential role in the fundraising in preparation for its initial public offering. Prior to Hygear Ltd. Mr. Birenberg served as the CFO of Hinoman group, a startup in the food-tech industry, from 2020 to 2022. Prior to Hinoman group, Mr. Birenberg served as the CFO of SEEDO Corp Group, a U.S. publicly traded startup in the Cannabis industry, from 2018 to 2020.

Michal Lebovitz Nissimov
 
Michal is an experienced lawyer with expertise in corporate, commercial, business and consumer law, mergers and acquisitions advisory services and cannabis regulation and compliance.
 
As a member of the senior management team, Michal oversees all corporate legal and regulatory aspects in a highly regulated sector. IMC’s reporting obligations as a publicly traded company, annual operational planning, execution of key, strategic projects, and translating strategy into actionable goals are all part of her remit. Prior to joining the Company, from 2019 to 2023, Michal was a Senior Associate at Salomon, Lipschütz & Co in the Mergers and Acquisitions, Corporate and Commercial Team.
 
Michal thrives in a fast-paced and high growth environment. Her extensive knowledge and experience in legal affairs, related to medical cannabis, are key assets that inform IMC’s growth strategy and execution. Before joining IMC, she worked in the legal services industry as a senior lawyer at several leading Israeli law firms.
 
Richard Balla
 
Prior to leading Adjupharm, Richard acted as a founder, early-stage shareholder, advisor, and director of multiple international companies in the pharmaceutical and medical cannabis sectors. Before his entrepreneurial career, Mr. Balla served as Head of Market and Product Development at ACA Müller Pharma AG, one of the first and leading parallel import companies in Germany. Mr. Balla holds a Bachelor of Business Administration degree from Gewerbe-Akademie Konstan.
 
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Family Relationships
 
There are no family relationships among any of our executive officers or directors.
 
Special Arrangements
 
Not applicable.
 
B.          Compensation
 
Compensation Discussion and Analysis
 
Introduction
 
The purpose of this Compensation Discussion and Analysis is to provide information about the Company’s philosophy, objectives and processes regarding executive compensation. This disclosure is intended to communicate compensation provided to: (i) the chief executive officer (“CEO”) of the Company; (ii) the chief financial officer (“CFO” of the Company); (iii) each of the three most highly compensated executive officers of the Company, including any of its subsidiaries, or the three most highly compensated individuals acting in a similar capacity, other than the CEO and CFO of the Company, as at the end of the most recently completed financial year whose total compensation was, individually, more than C$150,000; and (iv) each individual who would be a Named Executive Officer (as defined herein) under paragraph (iii) but for the fact that the individual was neither an executive officer of the Company or its subsidiaries, nor acting in a similar capacity, as at December 31, 2023, (collectively, the “Named Executive Officers”) and (v) the directors of the Company. During the year ended December 31, 2023, the Named Executive Officers of the Company were as follows:
 
 

(1)
Oren Shuster, CEO and a director of the Company;
 

(2)
Uri Birenberg, CFO of the Company;
 

(3)
Itay Vago, former CFO of the Company;
 

(4)
Shai Shemesh, former CFO of the Company;
 

(5)
Marc Lustig, Executive Chairman and a director of the Company;
 

(6)
Eyal Fisher, CEO of the IMC Holdings and each of the Israeli Subsidiaries; and
 

(7)
Richard Balla, CEO of Adjupharm.
 
Compensation Philosophy and Objectives
 
The executive compensation program adopted by the Company and applied to its executive officers is designed to attract and retain qualified and experienced executives who will contribute to the success of the Company. The executive compensation program attempts to ensure that the compensation of the senior executive officers provides a competitive base compensation package and a strong link between corporate performance and compensation. Senior executive officers are motivated through the program to enhance long-term shareholder value and rewarded for their yearly individual contribution in the context of overall annual corporate performance.
 
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Elements of Compensation
 
The compensation paid to executive officers in any year consists of three primary components:
 

1.
base salary;
 

2.
cash bonuses; and/or
 

3.
long-term incentives.
 
The Company believes that making a significant portion of executive officers’ compensation based on long-term incentives supports the Company’s executive compensation philosophy, as these forms of compensation allow those most accountable for the Company’s long-term success to acquire and hold Common Shares.
 
For the year ended December 31, 2023, all executive compensation was determined and administered by Board based on recommendations by the compensation committee of the Company (the “Compensation Committee”).
 
The key features of these three primary components of compensation are discussed below:
 
1.
Base Salary
 
Base salary recognizes the value of an individual to the Company based on his or her role, skill, performance, contributions, leadership and potential. It is critical in attracting and retaining executive talent in the markets in which the Company competes for talent. Base salaries for executive officers are reviewed annually. Any change in the base salary of an executive officer is generally determined by an assessment of such executive’s performance, a consideration of competitive compensation levels in companies similar to the Company and a review of the performance of the Company as a whole and the role such executive officer played in such corporate performance.
 
2.
Cash Bonuses
 
Cash bonuses for the executive officers are determined by reference to the Company’s actual performance relative to objectives and individual contributions toward such performance. All awards made to executive officers are subject to the review and approval of the Compensation Committee and Board and are examined in absolute terms as well as in relation to peer company performance.
 
3.
Long Term Incentives
 
Long term incentives, such as stock options (“Options”) and restricted share units (“RSUs”) are provided to focus management’s attention on corporate performance over a period of time longer than one year in recognition of long-term horizons for return on investments and strategic decisions. The number of Options and/or RSUs given to each executive officer is determined by his or her position, past contribution and potential future contributions to the Company and the number and terms of Options and RSU awards previously granted to the executive officer. The securities-based awards granted under the Option plan (the “Stock Option Plan”) and RSU plan (the “RSU Plan” and together with the Stock Option Plan, the “Securities Based Compensation Arrangements”) are reviewed by the Compensation Committee. The Compensation Committee determines a meaningful level of awards for executive officers of the Company. The number of Options and RSUs are also influenced by the number of officers and key employees in the current year and the likelihood of grants in future years to officers and key employees since the aggregate number of Common Shares available for issuance pursuant to all Securities Based Compensation Arrangements cannot exceed 10% of the Company’s issued Common Shares on a rolling basis.
 
Other than the Securities Based Compensation Arrangements, the Company does not have any other long-term incentive plans pursuant to which securities or cash compensation is intended to serve as an incentive for performance over a period greater than one financial year.
 
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Stock Option Plan
 
The Stock Option Plan was approved by the shareholders of the Company at the annual general and special meeting of shareholders held on July 28, 2021 and replaced the previous stock option plan of the Company (the “Predecessor Stock Option Plan”). The Predecessor Stock Option Plan continues to exist but only for the purpose of governing the terms of Options that were granted under the Predecessor Stock Option Plan prior to the adoption of the Stock Option Plan.
 
The purpose of the Stock Option Plan is to provide the Company with the advantages of the incentive inherent in equity ownership on the part of directors, executive officers, employees and consultants (collectively, the “Eligible Persons”) who are responsible for the continued success of the Company; to create in those Eligible Persons a proprietary interest in, and a greater concern for, the welfare and success of the Company; to encourage Eligible Persons to remain with the Company and any subsidiaries; and to attract new employees, directors, officers and consultants.
 
The Stock Option Plan is administered by the Compensation Committee. The Compensation Committee has the authority to grant Options to Eligible Persons and subject to the policies of the Canadian stock exchange upon which the Common Shares principally trade, will determine the terms and conditions applicable to the exercise of those Options including the number of Common Shares issuable under each Option, the exercise price, the expiry date, vesting conditions, if any, the nature and duration of the restrictions, if any, to be imposed on the sale or other disposition of Common Shares acquired on exercise of the Option, and the events, if any, that give rise to a termination or expiry of the Option participant’s rights under the Option, and the period in which such termination or expiry can occur. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the maximum term of any Option granted under the Stock Option Plan is ten years. The Stock Options Plan provides for a cashless exercise procedure.
 
The total number of Common Shares that may be reserved for issuance to all directors and executive officers as a group under the Stock Option Plan and any other Securities Based Compensation Arrangements, in aggregate, cannot exceed, at any time, or within any 12-month period, 10% of the issued and outstanding Common Shares, on a non-diluted basis, as at the date of grant of any Options under the Stock Option Plan.
 
The total number of Common Shares that may be reserved for issuance and granted to any one Executive (as defined in the Stock Option Plan) under the Stock Option Plan and all other Securities Based Compensation Arrangements, in aggregate, cannot exceed at any time, or within a 12-month period, 5% of the issued and outstanding Common Shares, on a non-diluted basis, as at the date of grant of any Options under the Stock Option Plan.
 
The total number of Common Shares that may be reserved for issuance and granted to persons engaging in investor relations activities under the Stock Option Plan and all other Securities Based Compensation Arrangements, in aggregate, cannot exceed at any time, or within a 12-month period, 1% of the issued and outstanding Common Shares, on a non-diluted basis, as at the date of grant of any Options under the Stock Option Plan.
 
The Board may terminate the Stock Option Plan at any time in its absolute discretion, without shareholder approval. If the Stock Option Plan is terminated, no further Options will be granted, but the Options then outstanding will continue in full force and effect in accordance with the provisions of the Stock Option Plan until the time they are exercised or terminated or expire under the terms of the Stock Option Plan and the applicable Option agreement.
 
RSU Plan
 
The RSU Plan was approved by shareholders at a special meeting of shareholders held on December 16, 2020. The RSU Plan was established to provide a financial incentive for employees, consultants and directors of the Company, to devote their best efforts towards the long-term success of the Company’s business, by aligning qualified participants’ financial interests with those of the Company and its shareholders, to assist the Company in attracting and retaining individuals with top-level talent, passion, ability, and an overall commitment to the business of the Company, and to ensure that the total compensation provided to such participants is at competitive levels. Accordingly, the RSU Plan is intended to supplement the Company’s other Securities Based Compensation Arrangements provided that the aggregate issuances under the RSU Plan and all other the Securities Based Compensation Arrangements do not exceed 10% of the issued and outstanding Common Shares on a non-diluted basis immediately prior to the proposed grant of the applicable RSUs.
 
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The RSU Plan provides that RSUs may be granted by the Compensation Committee to directors, executive officers, employees and consultants of the Company (each an “RSU Participant”). The Compensation Committee determines from time to time the RSU Participants to whom RSUs are granted and the provisions and restrictions with respect to such grant. The Compensation Committee takes into consideration the present and potential contributions of and the services rendered by the particular RSU Participant to the success of the Company and any other factors which the Compensation Committee deems appropriate and relevant.
 
Each RSU entitles the RSU Participant, subject to the RSU Participant’s satisfaction of any conditions, restrictions or limitations imposed under the RSU Plan or RSU grant letter, to receive: (i) one previously unissued Common Share for each RSU; or (ii) a cash payment equal to the number of RSUs multiplied by the fair market value of one Common Share on the vesting date; or (iii) a combination of (i) and (ii), as determined by the Compensation Committee, on the date when the RSU is fully vested. Concurrent with the determination to grant RSUs to a RSU Participant, the Compensation Committee also determines the vesting schedule applicable to such RSUs, which shall extend no later than December 15th of the third calendar year following the calendar year in which the grant occurred in respect of the RSUs.
 
RSU grants are subject to additional limitations under the terms of the RSU Plan. Unless permitted by the CSE or approved by disinterested shareholders:
 

(a)
the maximum number of RSUs available for grant to any one person under the RSU Plan and any other Securities Based Compensation Arrangements of the Company in a 12-month period is 5% of the total number of Common Shares then outstanding on a non-diluted basis; and
 

(b)
the maximum number of Common Shares issuable to insiders of the Company (as a group) under the RSU Plan, together with any other Common Shares issuable under any other Securities Based Compensation Arrangements, shall not exceed at any time or within any 12-month period, 10% of the issued and outstanding Common Shares on a non-diluted basis at the time of grant.
 
Further, the total number of Common Shares issuable to any RSU Participant performing investor relations activities over any 12-month period, pursuant to the RSU Plan and together with any other Common Shares issuable under any other Securities Based Compensation Arrangements, cannot exceed 1% of the issued and outstanding number of Common Shares then outstanding on a non-diluted basis at the time of grant.
 
The Board or Compensation Committee, as the case may be, may terminate, discontinue or amend the RSU Plan at any time, provided that, without the consent of an RSU Participant, such termination, discontinuance or amendment may not in any manner adversely affect such RSU Participant’s rights under any RSU granted to such RSU Participant under the RSU Plan.
 
The Board or Compensation Committee may, subject to the receipt of shareholder approval and the receipt of any regulatory approval including any stock exchange approval (where required), make the following amendments to the RSU Plan or RSUs under the RSU Plan:
 

(a)
increase the number of Common Shares which may be issued pursuant to the RSU Plan, other than by virtue of a change in Common Shares, whether by reason of a stock dividend, consolidation, subdivision or reclassification which adjustment may be made by the Board or Compensation Committee for the number of Common Shares available under the RSU Plan and the number of Common Shares subject to RSUs;
 
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(b)